Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
Saving the Salt Marsh, Protecting Coastal Communities

Nick Ernst, Widlife Biologist for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Marci Cole Ekberg, Coastal Ecologist for Save the Bay, discuss marsh elevation at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in Rhode Island.

October 24, 2014 - Many U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service projects currently funded by Hurricane Sandy resilience investments, including marsh restorations in Delaware, New Jersey and a stretch from Rhode Island to southern Maine, focus on restoring sediment transport to help bolster healthy coastal marshes and enhance natural defenses that protect coastal communities and sustain people and wildlife. Susan Adamowicz, Land Management and Research Demonstration Biologist at Maine’s Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, acknowledges how Sandy resilience funding offers an opportunity to pursue solutions that can help return larger amounts of sediment to the coast and boost marsh elevation. “In these coastal ecosystems, it’s all about elevation, elevation, elevation,” says Adamowicz. Damaged and undersized culverts are being replaced where needed, and obsolete dams are likewise being evaluated for removal, including several in Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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Nick Ernst, Widlife Biologist for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Marci Cole Ekberg, Coastal Ecologist for Save the Bay, discuss marsh elevation at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in Rhode Island. Credit: Tom Sturm/USFWS


Spotlight on Hurricane Sandy Story Corps Youth Interns

Summer 2014 Student Conservation Association intern, Charlotte Murtishaw, was part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hurricane Sandy youth story corps, which provides communications experience to college interns.

October 23, 2014 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hurricane Sandy youth story corps provides communications experience to interns such as Brittany Bowker of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Charlotte Murtishaw of Barnard College. In a recent blog post, Bowker reports on Murtishaw’s experience as a summer 2014 Student Conservation Association and story corps intern, where she spent three months providing communications and outreach support for a range of environmental projects and on-site fieldwork related to Hurricane Sandy funded resilience and recovery projects.

View the Sandy story corps featured blog post
View Sandy story corps blog post: tidal marsh bird study in Conn.
View Sandy story corps photo set: surface elevation table installation in NJ


Summer 2014 Student Conservation Association intern, Charlotte Murtishaw, was part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hurricane Sandy youth story corps, which provides communications experience to college interns. Credit: USFWS


Building a Stronger Coast: Infographic

Building a Stronger Coast Infographic published today by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service describes recovery goals over next several years.

October 22, 2014 - Check out our “Building a Stronger Coast” infographic highlighting how the Service is working with partners to protect both coastal and inland areas two years after Hurricane Sandy. The infographic describes how we're investing $167 million in more than 80 projects in 14 states to restore natural defenses, sustain wildlife and safeguard communities.

View the Infographic: Building a Stronger Coast



Building a Stronger Coast Infographic published today by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service describes recovery goals over next several years. Credit: USFWS


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Last updated: July 23, 2014