Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
National Estuaries Conference Features Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resilience Efforts

Participants in the conference from the Service and partners include Susan C. Adamowicz, Ph.D. Session Chair; Matt Whitbeck, Chesapeake Marshlands NWR Complex; Susan Guiteras, Prime Hook NWR; Nick Ernst, RI NWR Complex; Boze Hancock, RI TNC, John Chafee NWR; Paul Castelli, Forsythe NWR; Kevin Holcomb, Chincoteague NWR; Georgia Basso, Monitoring Protocol

November 14, 2014 - This month, biologists from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service along with partners from The Nature Conservancy provided an overview of coastal resilience projects to attendees at the Restore America’s Estuaries national conference outside of Washington, D.C. Focusing on salt marsh and shoreline restoration, these projects -- supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery -- seek to strengthen natural areas that provide wildlife habitat and protection from storm surge and wave erosion. “As seminal as Pelican Island, the nation’s first national wildlife refuge, these projects will stand as our generation’s contribution to protection of our coasts and legacy of wildlife conservation,” said Dr. Susan Adamowicz, conference session chair and Land Management Research and Demonstration Biologist with the Service.

More about the Restoring America’s Estuaries 2014 conference
More about Hurricane Sandy funded projects


Participants in the conference from the Service and partners include Susan C. Adamowicz, Ph.D. Session Chair; Matt Whitbeck, Chesapeake Marshlands NWR Complex; Susan Guiteras, Prime Hook NWR; Nick Ernst, RI NWR Complex; Boze Hancock, RI TNC, John Chafee NWR; Paul Castelli, Forsythe NWR; Kevin Holcomb, Chincoteague NWR; Georgia Basso, Monitoring Protocol. Credit: William Crouch/USFWS


Hail Cove Project Offers Marsh Protection near Chesapeake Bay

Aerial view of  Hail Cove at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge, where the 4,000 foot living shoreline planned for the site will protect 400 acres of marsh land.

November 3, 2014 - People living near Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge on Maryland’s Eastern Shore will benefit from a 4,000-foot living shoreline project to protect marshes at Hail Cove. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded a $1.3 million contract last month for the Hurricane Sandy resilience funded project to reduce erosion and wave action, protecting 400 acres of tidal marshes in the Chester River. Coastal marshes are natural buffers for communities against hurricanes and other severe storms. Colorado-based contractor, Ayuda Companies, will complete the work during the next two years under the contract. Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge is a stopover and wintering area for thousands of waterfowl feeding in the Chester River, and Hail Creek is regarded as one of the top five waterfowl habitats in Maryland.

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More about the Hail Cove project


Aerial view of Hail Cove at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge, where the 4,000 foot living shoreline planned for the site will protect 400 acres of marsh land. Credit: Rick Bennett/USFWS


Two Years After Sandy: Marsh Restoration in Delaware

VIDEO: Flying over Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, where one of the largest coastal marsh restorations on the Atlantic Coast will benefit communities such as Milton and Milford, Del.

October 31, 2014 - In Delaware, one of the largest coastal marsh restorations on the Atlantic Coast is expected to begin next Fall. On and adjacent to Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, about $40 million in Hurricane Sandy resilience and recovery funding will rebuild about one mile of existing dunes and barrier beach and fill gaps that were created by the storm. The project will also restore approximately 4,000 acres of back-barrier tidal marsh which will enhance and support a long stretch of barrier beach along the Delaware Bay. Restored marshes at the refuge will provide benefits to several adjacent and nearby communities such as Milton and Milford, Del. and create additional habitat for birds such as rufa red knots, American oystercatchers, and piping plovers. The restored marsh will also improve the communities’ ability to withstand future storms and sea level rise, improve wildlife habitat, and improve beach access.

View aerial footage: Flying over Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge
More about the Prime Hook coastal tidal marsh and barrier beach project
Blog post featuring the Prime Hook resilience and recovery project

VIDEO: Flying over Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, where one of the largest coastal marsh restorations on the Atlantic Coast will benefit communities such as Milton and Milford, Del. Credit: USFWS


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Last updated: July 23, 2014