Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Monarch butterfly on an aster, John Heinz NWR. Credit: Rick L. Hansen / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Celebrate Bats, Bees, Beetles and Other Species During National Pollinator Week: June 16-22

June 20, 2014

Do you like chocolate, almonds, honey, fruits, flowers and vegetables? Pollinators -- most bees and some birds, bats and other insects -- play a crucial role in flowering plant reproduction and in the production of most fruits and vegetables. These hard-working animals help make possible more than 75 percent of our flowering plants and nearly 75 percent of our crops. There are simple things you can do at home to encourage pollinator diversity and abundance, including planting a pollinator garden and avoiding or limiting pesticide use.

More Information »»

Open Spaces Blog »»

Monarch butterfly on an aster, John Heinz NWR. Credit: Rick L. Hansen / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland is one of 54 project sites that will benefit from Department of the Interior grants announced today. Credit: Ray Paterra / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Interior Secretary Announces $102 Million to Help Atlantic Coast Communities Withstand Future Storms

June 20, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced $102 million in funding to improve Atlantic coastal resiliency in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Projects will restore marsh, beach and riparian habitat that help strengthen coasts to withstand future storms and sea-level rise predicted with a changing climate, benefiting both wildlife and coastal communities. Techniques include eradicating invasive species, restoring hydrology by removing barriers such as dams that pose flood risks and prevent fish migration, and reusing dredge materials and rock to create and restore habitat. Many of the 54 projects selected will complement U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service efforts already underway along the Atlantic Coast.

News Release (DOI) »»

Hurricane Sandy Recovery »»

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland is one of 54 project sites that will benefit from Department of the Interior grants announced today. Credit: Ray Paterra / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Karner blue butterfly. Credit: Joel Trick / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Agencies Extend Public Comment Period on Proposed ESA Critical Habitat Regulations

June 20, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Fisheries Service – the two federal agencies responsible for administering the Endangered Species Act – are extending the public comment periods on two rules and a policy to improve the process of designating areas of “critical habitat” and consulting on the effects of federal actions on critical habitat.

Bulletin »»

Improving ESA »»

Karner blue butterfly. Credit: Joel Trick / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Tri-colored bat with white-nose syndrome. Credit: Bruce Schuette/MDC
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Awards $1.8 Million in Grants for Work on Deadly Bat Disease

June 18, 2014

The Service announced  $1.8 million in grants for the research and management of white-nose syndrome, a fungal infection that has killed millions of hibernating bats in eastern North America. Funding was granted to projects that will help scientists better understand and respond to the disease. 

News Release »»

Tri-colored bat with white-nose syndrome. Credit: Bruce Schuette/MDC
Higher Quality Version of Image

Bats roosting under bridge. Credit: Nick Gikas / Indiana State University
Higher Quality Version of Image

Fungus that Causes Deadly Bat Disease Discovered in Mississippi

June 17, 2014

The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats was recently discovered for the first time in Mississippi. So far, only the fungus has been confirmed, not the disease itself. Since its detection in New York in 2007, WNS has been confirmed in 25 states and five Canadian Provinces, decimating many bat populations. Winter bat colonies in some states have declined by more than 90 percent.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Bats roosting under bridge. Credit: Nick Gikas / Indiana State University
Higher Quality Version of Image

A tower of ivory tusks waits to be destroyed during the Service's Ivory Crush in November. Credit: Gavin Shire / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

FWS Applauds 'Antiques Roadshow' for Ending Appraisals of Carved Elephant Tusks

June 16, 2014

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe called the recent move by Antiques Roadshow to stop showing appraisals of carved ivory tusks "a significant step forward in ensuring that U.S. consumers don't contribute to the current global crisis in African elephant poaching and illegal trade of elephant ivory." Antiques Roadshow is a strong partner in explaining how antiques can add to illegal wildlife trafficking by feeding consumer demand for elephant ivory and other wildlife products.

Full Statement »»

Learn More »»

A tower of ivory tusks waits to be destroyed during the Service's Ivory Crush in November. Credit: Gavin Shire / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Climate change impacts such as warming water, decreased flows and depleted oxygen levels are predicted to stress fish populations and impact recreational fishing. Credit: George Gentry/ USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Director Ashe Testifies on Climate Change Impacts

June 13, 2014

Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe testifies before the Senate Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Green Jobs and the New Economy on the impacts of climate change to hunting and fishing opportunities in the United States. The Director has also written a blog on the need to act on climate change.

Watch the hearing (via C-SPAN3) »»

Director Ashe's Blog »»

Learn More »»

Climate change impacts such as warming water, decreased flows and depleted oxygen levels are predicted to stress fish populations and impact recreational fishing. Credit: George Gentry/ USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

These items were among the one ton of ivory seized by Service special agents during their investigation of Victor Gordon's smuggling schemes and U.S. business deals. Credit: Bill Butcher/ USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Trafficking in Elephant Ivory Means Prison for Store Owner

June 13, 2014

A judge in New York sentenced Victor Gordon to 30 months in prison, followed by two years of supervised release, for smuggling elephant ivory into the United States. The Philadelphia store owner must also pay a fine of $7,500 and forfeit $150,000 and the approximately one ton of elephant ivory that agents seized from Gordon's store in 2009. That remains one of the largest seizures of elephant ivory in U.S. history.

News Release (DOJ) »»

Learn More »»

These items were among the one ton of ivory seized by Service special agents during their investigation of Victor Gordon's smuggling schemes and U.S. business deals. Credit: Bill Butcher/ USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

White-tail bucks stand alert in a golden field at Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge in Montana. Credit: Kimi Smith / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Summer Adventures Abound at National Wildlife Refuges

June 9, 2014

See nature in a new light. Summer's a great time to experience natural wonders at a national wildlife refuge and have fun in the process. Choose from a host of family-friendly events, such as bird festivals, guided nature hikes and learn-to-fish days. Visit a refuge and learn how the Refuge System is protecting your natural heritage.

Learn More »»

Find a Refuge »»

White-tail bucks stand alert in a golden field at Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge in Montana. Credit: Kimi Smith / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Rising demand for rhino horn threatens the species existence. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Rhino-Horn Smuggling 'Boss' Sentenced to 70 Months in Prison

June 5, 2014

A judge sentenced Zhifei Li, the owner of an antiques business in China, to almost six years in prison for heading an illegal wildlife smuggling conspiracy in which 30 rhinoceros horns and objects made from rhino horn and elephant ivory were smuggled from the United States to China. Tuesday's sentence was one of the longest sentence ever to be imposed in the United States for a wildlife smuggling crime, and it is the latest victory for Operation Crash, a nationwide effort to investigate and prosecute those involved in the black market trade of rhinoceros horns.

News Release (DOJ) »»

Learn More »»

Rising demand for rhino horn threatens the species existence. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Names Robert Dreher as New Associate Director

June 4, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has named former Justice Department Acting Assistant Attorney General Robert G. Dreher as its new Associate Director, beginning May 18. Mr. Dreher has considerable experience in government and for-profit and non-profit sectors, having represented environmental organizations, federal agencies, tribes and businesses in a wide range of environmental matters. As the Service's Associate Director, Mr. Dreher will be the principal advisor to the Director on major policy issues, and will represent the agency's priorities within the Department of Interior and the broader administration.

News Release »»

Credit:

Hong Kong seized ivory stockpile (video capture). Credit: Government of Hong Kong
Higher Quality Version of Image

Hong Kong Burns First Batch of its Ivory Stockpile

June 3, 2014

The Service applauds the destruction by the Government of Hong Kong of some of its seized ivory. The incineration is the first in a series that the country will undertake over the next several months to destroy its nearly 30-ton stockpile, one of the largest in the world, and follows on from the crushing of 6 tons of seized ivory by Service last year.

Hong Kong Government News Release »»

Photos of the even »»

About the Ivory Crush »»

Hong Kong seized ivory stockpile (video capture). Credit: Government of Hong Kong
Higher Quality Version of Image

African elephant bull in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. Credit: Joe Milmoe / USFW
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Takes Next Steps in Commercial Elephant Ivory Trade Ban, Eases Restrictions on Musical Instruments and Other Uses

June 3, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced two actions relating to commercial trade in elephant ivory. These actions will help ensure that domestic markets do not contribute to the decline of African elephants in the wild, while also allowing certain activities to continue that we do not believe are contributing to poaching or illegal trade.

News Release »»

Ivory Ban Q&A »»

National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking »»

Photo Gallery of African Elephants »»

African elephant bull in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. Credit: Joe Milmoe / USFW
Higher Quality Version of Image

Law Enforcement badge Credit: USFWS

Service Special Agent Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

May 20, 2014

Resident Agent in Charge Leo Suazo of the Service’s Office of Law Enforcement was awarded the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s 2014 Guy Bradley Award at a ceremony at the U.S. Department of the Interior. Named after the first wildlife officer killed in the line of duty in 1905, the Guy Bradley Award recognizes individuals for outstanding lifetime contributions to wildlife law enforcement.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Law Enforcement badge Credit: USFWS

The Nez Perce Tribe will receive a Tribal Wildlife Grant for restoration of bighorn sheep populations and habitats along the Salmon River, Idaho. Credit: Ann Hough / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Tribes in 15 States Receive $4.6 Million for Conservation Work

May 15, 2014

Federally recognized tribes in 15 states are receiving a total of $4.6 million in Tribal Wildlife Grants to fund a wide range of fish and wildlife conservation projects. The grants create opportunities for tribes to build conservation capacity and to work with the Service on a variety of issues including species restoration, fish passage, protection of migratory birds and efforts to cope with the long-term effects of a changing climate.

News Release »»

The Nez Perce Tribe will receive a Tribal Wildlife Grant for restoration of bighorn sheep populations and habitats along the Salmon River, Idaho. Credit: Ann Hough / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image