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Click to watch the Service’s animated fish migration video Credit: USFWS
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People Around the Globe Celebrate World Fish Migration Day

May 26, 2016

As part of a global initiative to highlight the importance of conserving migratory fish species and aquatic ecosystems, the United States and approximately 60 other countries are celebrating World Fish Migration Day on May 21, 2016. More than 1,500 organizations are participating in the occasion, holding over 400 events, including dam destructions to open fish passageways, river cleanups, educational seminars and fishing activities. 

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Click to watch the Service’s animated fish migration video Credit: USFWS
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African elephants have been devastated by wildlife trafficking. Credit: Gary M. Stolz / USFWS
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Wildlife Smuggler to Pay Half-a-Million in Fine

May 20, 2016

A Minnesota man has been sentenced after he pleaded guilty to smuggling elephant ivory and rhinoceros horns from the United States to China. He will pay $500,000 to the Lacey Act Reward Fund, which helps fight wildlife crimes. He was also sentenced to 12 days in prison, three years of probation and 150 hours of community service. The man ran an online business that sold items made of elephant ivory and rhinoceros horn. “It takes all of us to protect these endangered species, here and around the world,” says Fish and Wildlife Service Deputy Law Enforcement Chief Ed Grace.

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African elephants have been devastated by wildlife trafficking. Credit: Gary M. Stolz / USFWS
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Native wildlife such as the monarch butterfly will benefit from State Wildlife Grants. Credit: Laura Perlick
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More Than $5.5 Million in Grants Will Help Protect Imperiled Species

May 20, 2016

Native wildlife such as the monarch butterfly and eastern hellbender will benefit from $5.5 million in grants awarded through the Service’s competitive State Wildlife Grants program. The funds help conserve and protect Species of Greatest Conservation Need), and this year will be distributed to 11 state fish and wildlife agencies and one regional fish and wildlife association.

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Native wildlife such as the monarch butterfly will benefit from State Wildlife Grants. Credit: Laura Perlick
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Collaborative conservation works, as demonstrated by efforts that have helped restore populations of American white pelicans across the continent. Pictured at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. Credit: Rick Bohn / USFWS
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North America Unites Behind Call to Conserve Birds, Secure Vital Habitats

May 19, 2016

Partners, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, today released The State of North America’s Birds 2016, the first comprehensive report assessing the conservation status of all bird species that occur in Canada, the continental United States and Mexico. This report shows that more than one third of all North American bird species need urgent conservation action and calls for a renewed, continent-wide commitment to saving our shared birds and their habitats. It is a call to action to governments, private industry and the public to come together to support a beloved shared resource: our migratory birds.

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Collaborative conservation works, as demonstrated by efforts that have helped restore populations of American white pelicans across the continent. Pictured at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. Credit: Rick Bohn / USFWS
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Florida grasshopper sparrow and chicks. Credit: RSCF / www.rarespecies.org
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First Captive-Bred Florida Grasshopper Sparrow Chicks Hatched

May 17, 2016

The Florida grasshopper sparrow “is teetering on the brink of extinction," with probably fewer than 150 left, says Larry Williams, the Fish and Wildlife Service’s State Ecological Services supervisor in Florida. That’s why it’s so important that earlier this month the first captive-bred Florida grasshopper sparrow chicks hatched at the Rare Species Conservatory Foundation in Loxahatchee, Florida.

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Florida grasshopper sparrow and chicks. Credit: RSCF / www.rarespecies.org
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Coastal wetland. Credit: Lamar Gore / USFWS
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Service Reopens Comment Period on Proposed Revisions to Mitigation Policy

May 11, 2016

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a reopening of the comment period for 30 days on its proposed revised Mitigation Policy, which has guided agency recommendations to address the impacts of land and water development on America’s wildlife and their habitats since 1981. The revisions will provide a broad and flexible framework to facilitate conservation that addresses the potential negative effects of development, while allowing economic activity to continue.

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Coastal wetland. Credit: Lamar Gore / USFWS
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Boats at Rybovich Marina. Credit: Kim Betton / USFWS
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Service Awards Nearly $14 Million in Clean Vessel Act Grants

May 11, 2016

Wildlife and recreational boaters in 21 states will benefit from $13.7 million in grants awarded through the Service’s Clean Vessel Act program. The program helps U.S. states and territories maintain clean, healthy waters by providing financial support for safe and reliable pump-out systems, boater education programs, and construction of boat ramps, docks and other infrastructure that creates jobs in local communities.

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Boats at Rybovich Marina. Credit: Kim Betton / USFWS
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Green Sea Turtle - 2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest Semi-Finalist. Credit: by Jasmine Singh.
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Partners Across the Globe to Celebrate International Endangered Species Day

May 10, 2016

The 11th annual international Endangered Species Day will be celebrated on May 20, 2016, with special events and programs that highlight the importance of conserving endangered, threatened and at-risk species around the world. In the U.S., National Wildlife Refuges, parks, botanical gardens, schools, libraries, museums, community groups and conservation organizations will hold various conservation oriented activities throughout the month. For more information about Endangered Species Day, including a list of events occurring across the country, visit http://www.endangeredspeciesday.org.

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Green Sea Turtle - 2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest Semi-Finalist. Credit: by Jasmine Singh.
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Golden-winged warblers in North Carolina’s southern Appalachian Mountains will benefit from the grants. Credit: Mike Sweet
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$4 Million Boost Will Help Migratory Birds, Habitats Across the Americas

May 10, 2016

Migratory birds in the Western Hemisphere will benefit from $4 million in grants for 32 collaborative conservation projects. The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act grants will leverage the Service’s investment with $16.9 million in additional partner funds—a more than four-to-one match. The projects will conserve migratory bird habitat, engage local communities in bird habitat protection, and strengthen international relations, while raising awareness of the importance of bird conservation

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Golden-winged warblers in North Carolina’s southern Appalachian Mountains will benefit from the grants. Credit: Mike Sweet
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Winners Kelly Lance (left) and Jacqueline Nott with Service Director Dan Ashe. Credit: Kayt Jonsson / USFWS
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Designs to Help Reduce Elephant Poaching

May 9, 2016

Kelly Lance of Monterey, California, and Jacqueline Nott of Auburn, California, will see their ideas on paper transformed into three dimensions during the coming months as winners of the Ivory Crush Design Challenge, which invited entrants to propose powerful visual concepts for public displays of crushed ivory from the Service’s Ivory Crushes. The Service will work with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums to build and display the designs.

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Winners Kelly Lance (left) and Jacqueline Nott with Service Director Dan Ashe. Credit: Kayt Jonsson / USFWS
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2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest Grand Prize Winner. Credit: by Miles Yun.
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Winners Announced for 2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest

May 6, 2016

Miles Yun of La Canada, Calif., is the grand prize winner of the 2016 Endangered Species Youth Art Contest. The contest engages school children in grades K-12 in expressing their appreciation for our nation’s most imperiled wildlife and is an integral part of the 11th annual national Endangered Species Day, which will take place May 20, 2016.

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2016 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest Grand Prize Winner. Credit: by Miles Yun.
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Gregory Siekaniec. Credit: Becca Hiller
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Gregory Siekaniec Appointed as Regional Director for Alaska

May 5, 2016

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe today announced the appointment of Gregory Siekaniec as the agency's Regional Director for Alaska. Siekaniec, a career Service employee, previously served as the agency's Deputy Director for Policy, before leaving the Service in 2012 to assume the leadership of Ducks Unlimited Canada.

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Gregory Siekaniec. Credit: Becca Hiller
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Eagles hold a revered place in our nation’s history and culture. Credit: Todd Harless/USFWS Credit: Todd Harless / USFWS
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New Science Provides Foundation for Proposed Changes to Service’s Eagle Conservation and Management Program

May 4, 2016

In a move designed to maintain strong protections for bald and golden eagles, the Service is opening a 60-day public comment period on proposed improvements to its comprehensive eagle conservation and management program. The proposed changes include modifications to the regulations governing permits for incidental take of bald and golden eagles that will protect eagle populations during the course of otherwise lawful human activities.

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Eagles hold a revered place in our nation’s history and culture. Credit: Todd Harless/USFWS Credit: Todd Harless / USFWS
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Puerto Rico harlequin butterfly. Credit: USFWS
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Federal Agencies Propose Revisions to CCAA Policy under the ESA

May 3, 2016

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries today proposed revisions to the Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances (CCAAs) policy under the Endangered Species Act. The revisions, which do not change requirements of participating landowners, will simplify the process of developing and approving CCAAs, which provide incentives for the public to implement specific conservation measures for declining species before they are listed under the ESA. The Service is also proposing changes to its CCAA regulations to make them consistent with the proposed changes to the policy.

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Puerto Rico harlequin butterfly. Credit: USFWS
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From Left to Right: Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio; Cheryl Jefferson, U.S. Forest Service; Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region; and Ivy Taylor, Mayor of San Antonio. Credit: Katie Latta/USFWS
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City of San Antonio Steps It Up For Monarchs

May 2, 2016

Mayors of towns and cities across America are pitching in to help save the monarch butterfly from possible extinction. One of our partners, The National Wildlife Federation, has created the Mayors’ Monarch Pledge that helps cities take specific actions to benefit this species. Last week, Mayor Ivy Taylor of San Antonio, Texas, received accolades from Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region, for being the first mayor to agree to take all 24 actions outlined in the pledge. In addition, Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio, signed the Monarch Pledge. 

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From Left to Right: Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio; Cheryl Jefferson, U.S. Forest Service; Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region; and Ivy Taylor, Mayor of San Antonio. Credit: Katie Latta/USFWS
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