Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Dove hunters. Credit: George Andrejko / AZGFD
Higher Quality Version of Image

Dove Hunter Survey Results Provide Valuable Insights to Help Sustain Dove Hunting for the Long Term

July 22, 2014

Results from a first-of-its-kind survey of the nation’s mourning dove hunters were released today by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA), National Flyway Council and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The survey, in which more than 12,000 dove hunters from around the country participated, will provide wildlife and natural resources managers with information to help them effectively manage and conserve this migratory bird species into the future.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Dove hunters. Credit: George Andrejko / AZGFD
Higher Quality Version of Image

Young visitors looks at a snake held by a refuge biologist at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Credit: Andrea Brophy / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Refuge Rangers Fight Myths about Creepy Crawlies and Other Wildlife

July 17, 2014

In the course of greeting tens of thousands of visitors a year, rangers on national wildlife refuges bump up against a few fears. They've noticed, today's visitors tend to live more indoor lives than past generations and fears of nature are flourishing – in all ages. And it's not just snakes. Other wild creatures inspire exaggerated fears, too: bats; spiders; birds; fish – yes, fish. To help anxious visitors, refuge staffers have some proven tactics.

News Release »»

Young visitors looks at a snake held by a refuge biologist at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Credit: Andrea Brophy / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Refuge staff fishing with kids at Erie National Wildlife Refuge in Pennsylvania. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Enjoy Great Recreation and Events at a National Wildlife Refuge!

July 17, 2014

Summer is a great time to discover what national wildlife refuges have to offer. Enjoy splendid kayaking or fishing. Try a guided hike or a bird walk. Or choose from a host of other family-friendly events. Come away wowed. Visit a refuge and learn how the National Wildlife Refuge System is protecting your natural heritage.

Learn More »»

Find a Refuge »»

Refuge staff fishing with kids at Erie National Wildlife Refuge in Pennsylvania. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

“Having a close encounter with a bobcat was by far my most memorable event ever” at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge, says volunteer Steve Gifford, who took a series of photos of this animal. A short video of that encounter is at http://bit.ly/1uXr8wf. Credit: Courtesy of Steve Gifford
Higher Quality Version of Image

Refuge Volunteer Captures the Essence of a National Wildlife Refuge

July 17, 2014

As a volunteer and Friend for most of the past decade at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge in Indiana, Steve Gifford has assisted with marsh bird surveys, least tern-nest monitoring, trail clearing, invasive plant control, prescribed burns and presentations. But his extraordinary photography is what stands out. Read this and other stories in the July/August issue of Refuge Update

Learn More »»

“Having a close encounter with a bobcat was by far my most memorable event ever” at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge, says volunteer Steve Gifford, who took a series of photos of this animal. A short video of that encounter is at http://bit.ly/1uXr8wf. Credit: Courtesy of Steve Gifford
Higher Quality Version of Image

At-risk species such as the southern Idaho ground squirrel could benefit from voluntary conservation actions undertaken under the proposed Prelisting Conservation Policy Credit: Dennis Mackey / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Policy Proposed to Benefit At-Risk Wildlife, Provide Credits to Landowners Taking Voluntary Conservation Actions

July 17, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed a new policy that would give landowners credit for voluntary conservation actions for at-risk species. Under the policy, landowners could obtain credits for current efforts that benefit declining species. These conservation credits could later be redeemed to offset or mitigate actions that are detrimental to a species were it to subsequently be listed under the Act. The credits could also be traded or sold to a third party.

News Release »»

Q&As »»

At-risk species such as the southern Idaho ground squirrel could benefit from voluntary conservation actions undertaken under the proposed Prelisting Conservation Policy Credit: Dennis Mackey / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Cover of the Considering Multiple Futures: Scenario Planning to Address Uncertainty in Natural Resource Conservation. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

New Guide Helps Conservationists Address Uncertain Futures

July 15, 2014

A new guide from the Fish and Wildlife Service and Wildlife Conservation Society will help natural resource professionals address long-term, burgeoning threats such as climate change. Entitled, Considering Multiple Futures: Scenario Planning to Address Uncertainty in Natural Resource Conservation, the guide explains the core elements of scenario planning and includes 12 case studies that represent a variety of approaches for natural resource conservation.  

Bulletin »»

View Report »»

Cover of the Considering Multiple Futures: Scenario Planning to Address Uncertainty in Natural Resource Conservation. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Director Dan Ashe (right) purchases the first 2014-15 Duck Stamp from Gerald Roane, U.S Postmaster, Washington, D.C. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

New Federal and Junior Duck Stamps Now on Sale

July 7, 2014

Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe purchased the first 2014-2015 Federal Duck Stamp today as the nation's most unique and successful conservation stamp went on sale. This year's stamp features a pair of canvasbacks, while the winning Junior Duck Stamp is graced by a king eider. Since 1934, Federal Duck Stamp sales have raised more than $850 million to acquire and protect more than 6 million acres of wetlands habitat on national wildlife refuges.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Buy Stamps »»

Service Director Dan Ashe (right) purchases the first 2014-15 Duck Stamp from Gerald Roane, U.S Postmaster, Washington, D.C. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wetlands come in all sizes and shapes and serve different purposes. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Report Shows Declining Trend in Prairie Pothole Wetlands

July 7, 2014

Wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region, a key breeding area for waterfowl, declined by an estimated 74,340 acres between 1997 and 2009 – an average annual loss of 6,200 acres, a report indicates. Development and conversion to agricultural uses are among the chief threats to the region. The Fish and Wildlife Service is working to protect the Prairie Pothole Region through a series of actions including the Prairies Conservation Campaign.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Prairies Conservation Campaign »»

Wetlands come in all sizes and shapes and serve different purposes. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

A mixed flock of waterfowl takes flight at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Steve Hillebrand / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

North American Duck Populations Remain Strong, Wetland Pond Conditions Good, According to 2014 Duck Breeding Populations Survey

July 7, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced the release of the Trends in Duck Breeding Populations 2014 report, which details this year's results of the annual Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey. The survey estimated an overall duck population of 49.2 million birds, an increase of 8 percent over last year's estimate and 43 percent above the long-term average. While concerns over the long-term decline in natural wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region persist, wetland habitat conditions in the duck survey area, which included both natural and artificial ponds expected to maintain water into the summer, were mostly improved or similar to last year due to average to above-average precipitation. 

News Release »»

More Information »»

A mixed flock of waterfowl takes flight at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Steve Hillebrand / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wood storks are colonial nesters and prefer trees where birds have already built nests. Credit: Becky Skiba / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wood Stork Down-listing Offers Another Conservation Success Story

July 2, 2014

After 30 years of conservation and recovery work, the Fish and Wildlife Service is down-listing the wood stork from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today. When protected in 1984, the bird's population was sinking fast, but efforts by the Service, Southern states, tribes, conservation groups and other stakeholders have restored vital habitat and helped the species double its population since its original listing.

News Release »»

Wood storks are colonial nesters and prefer trees where birds have already built nests. Credit: Becky Skiba / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

SC3 students remove non-native plants from Town Run at Morgan's Grove Park. Credit: NCTC / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Shares Conservation Know-How with Young People

July 2, 2014

As part of its commitment to engage young people and prepare the next generation of conservation leaders, the Fish and Wildlife Service has joined forces with the Green Schools Alliance to host the National Student Climate and Conservation Congress (SC3) this week. Through classes, discussions with conservation leaders and scientists, and outdoor projects, SC3 is giving more than 100 high school students conservation leadership skills, an understanding of conservation career opportunities and awareness of outdoor recreational opportunities.

SC3 »»

Green Schools Alliance »»

SC3 students remove non-native plants from Town Run at Morgan's Grove Park. Credit: NCTC / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Bald eagle in flight. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Seeks Public Input on Eagle Management Objectives, Non-Purposeful Take Permits

June 27, 2014

The bald eagle's recovery from near extinction in the lower 48 states is an American success story, and the Service remains committed to the conservation of bald and golden eagles. Today the Service announced it will engage the public as it works to revise a rule governing how permits are issued for the non-purposeful take of bald and golden eagles. The Service will host five public information meetings in various locations around the country and open a 90-day public comment period.

News Release »»

More Information »»

Federal Register »»

Bald eagle in flight. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The plea by Ning Qiu is just the latest victory for the Service's Operation Crash, an ongoing law enforcement effort to halt the illegal trade in rhino horn and other wildlife parts and products. Credit: Karl Stromayer / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Texas Man Pleads Guilty to Rhino and Ivory Smuggling Conspiracy

June 27, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Justice announced that Ning Qiu, a resident of Frisco, Texas, pleaded guilty in federal court to participating in an illegal wildlife smuggling conspiracy, in violation of the Lacey Act. Qiu facilitated the illegal transport of nearly $1 million-worth of rhinoceros horns, and objects made from rhino horn and elephant ivory from the United States to China. As part of the plea agreement, the government agreed to recommend a 25-month prison sentence and a $150,000 fine due Qiu's cooperation and assistance in securing a conviction for Zhifei Li, the admitted "boss" of the conspiracy.

News Release (DOJ) »»

The plea by Ning Qiu is just the latest victory for the Service's Operation Crash, an ongoing law enforcement effort to halt the illegal trade in rhino horn and other wildlife parts and products. Credit: Karl Stromayer / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

A HECHO poll shows strong Latino support for conservation. Credit: HECHO
Higher Quality Version of Image

Latinos Help Make Conservation Happen

June 26, 2014

A recent poll for HECHO – Hispanics Enjoying Camping Hunting and Outdoors – shows how strongly Latinos value public lands, and the Service is dedicated to bringing the voices of such nontraditional but highly valuable stakeholders as HECHO to the table with us to discuss conservation.

Director's Blog »»

HECHO »»

Poll Results »»

A HECHO poll shows strong Latino support for conservation. Credit: HECHO
Higher Quality Version of Image

Albert Lapahie, a wildlife technician with the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife, holds a razorback sucker. Credit: San Juan River Basin Recovery Implementation Program
Higher Quality Version of Image

Razorback Suckers Return to Grand Canyon

June 25, 2014

Researchers recently discovered larval Razorback suckers, an endangered fish, in the lower Colorado River within Grand Canyon National Park. The findings indicate that these fish may be naturally reproducing in an area where the species has not been seen in more than 20 years. The Service and multiple partners have worked steadily on recovery of the Razorback sucker, including breeding and stocking hundreds of thousands of individual fish to augment wild populations.

News Release (DOI) »»

Razorback Sucker Species Profile »»

Grand Canyon National Park's Fisheries Program »»

Albert Lapahie, a wildlife technician with the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife, holds a razorback sucker. Credit: San Juan River Basin Recovery Implementation Program
Higher Quality Version of Image