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Wilderness offers soul-stirring adventures. A hiker celebrates a breathtaking wilderness view atop Chupadera Peak at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Credit: USFWS
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New Vision Will Ensure Future Generations Can Enjoy Wilderness

October 23, 2014

The Service and its federal partner agencies that make up the National Wilderness Preservation System have a new vision that will guide interagency collaboration to ensure the continued preservation of nearly 110 million acres of the most primitive of public lands. The 758 wilderness areas in 44 states and Puerto Rico protect large expanses of habitat that are home to hundreds of native species. The vision will help federal land management agencies protect and expand the benefits of our wilderness areas for people and wildlife at a landscape scale.

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Wilderness Act 50th Anniversary »»

Wilderness Act 50th Anniversary »»

Wilderness Flickr Photos »»

Wilderness offers soul-stirring adventures. A hiker celebrates a breathtaking wilderness view atop Chupadera Peak at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico. Credit: USFWS
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Regional Director Tom Melius and White Earth Nation Tribal Chairwoman Erma Vizenor, along with tribal and refuge architects. Credit: USFWS
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Service, Tribe Collaborate on Law Enforcement

October 23, 2014

Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge and the White Earth Nation have signed an agreement to work together on conservation law enforcement activities occurring on Tamarac Refuge. The agreement is a unique collaboration between a Native American tribe and Service law enforcement.

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Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge » »»

Regional Director Tom Melius and White Earth Nation Tribal Chairwoman Erma Vizenor, along with tribal and refuge architects. Credit: USFWS
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More than 25 million stamps were sold in its first two years raising more than $2.5 million for the Multinational Species Conservation Funds. Credit: USFWS
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Buy a Stamp; Save a Tiger, an Elephant and Other Imperiled Species

October 21, 2014

After almost a year, the public can again purchase the Save Vanishing Species Stamp at post offices and online. The stamp functions as a regular postal mail stamp that sells at a small premium. The additional money goes to the Service's Multinational Species Conservation Funds, directly funding conservation of elephants, rhinoceros, tigers, great apes and marine turtles.

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Order Stamps Online »»

More than 25 million stamps were sold in its first two years raising more than $2.5 million for the Multinational Species Conservation Funds. Credit: USFWS
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Golden eagle feathers packaged for sale on the black market by feather traffickers were discovered during the investigation. Credit: USFWS
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Operation Silent Wilderness Stems Black Market Trafficking of Eagles, Other Birds

October 21, 2014

Operation Silent Wilderness -- a nationwide investigation by the Service and the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife – successfully disrupted and dismantled a large network of black market wildlife profiteers involved in the trafficking of eagles and other federally protected migratory birds. Recently, the last defendant in the probe was sentenced.

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Summary of Operation Silent Wilderness »»

Case Photos »»

Golden eagle feathers packaged for sale on the black market by feather traffickers were discovered during the investigation. Credit: USFWS
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Thumbnail of the monarch emerge from a chrysalis in the wild video. Credit: USFWS
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Service, Partners Line Up to Conserve Monarch Butterfly

October 20, 2014

"The butterfly is in trouble, and it's going to need all the help we can give it," Service Director Dan Ashe tells National Geographic. The Service and partners from across the United States, Mexico and Canada are determined to conserve the well-known butterfly.

Read the Story »»

How You can Help: Plant Milkweed »»

Thumbnail of the monarch emerge from a chrysalis in the wild video. Credit: USFWS
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Thumbnail of the Ivory Challenge PSA video. Credit: USFWS
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Crush the Demand: Help Raise Awareness about Poaching’s Devastating Effect on Elephants

October 17, 2014

There’s still time! The submission deadline for the Crushed Ivory Design Challenge has been extended until 11:59 a.m. Dec. 31, 2014. The Service is extending the deadline in response to an overwhelming public request for more time to create thoughtful and informative designs. We urge you and your agency to be a part of this innovative public awareness effort to help save elephants and endangered wildlife.

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Ivory Crush Challenge PSA Video »»

Thumbnail of the Ivory Challenge PSA video. Credit: USFWS
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Pintails are early visitors to the boreal forest. Credit: J. Kelly / USFWS
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Protected Paths: Cross-Continental Journey to Conserve Migratory Birds

October 16, 2014

Follow northern pintails and lesser yellowlegs from their breeding grounds in the far north to wintering sites as far as the tip of South America, and learn how the Service is working to protect these and other migratory birds.

Open Spaces blog »»

Pintails are early visitors to the boreal forest. Credit: J. Kelly / USFWS
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New sand is deposited onto badly eroded beaches on New Jersey's Delaware Bay. Credit: Eric Schrading / USFWS
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National Wildlife Refuge Week Kicks Off With First Day Fee-Free!

October 15, 2014

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service invites America to celebrate National Wildlife Refuge Week (October 12-18, 2014) with a visit to a national wildlife refuge! While there, you can fish, hunt, hike or just immerse yourself in the tranquility of nature. As if you needed another good reason to share in America’s natural heritage, Sunday, October 12, is a fee-free day. Admission fees at wildlife refuges are waived on that day. Learn how wildlife refuges conserve your wildlife heritage and enrich your life, find one by you!

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Find a Refuge »»

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New sand is deposited onto badly eroded beaches on New Jersey's Delaware Bay. Credit: Eric Schrading / USFWS
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Straight-horned markhor. Credit: Peter Hopper / Creative Commons
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Successful Conservation Efforts Result in Reclassification of Rare Pakistani Mountain Goat Under the ESA

October 14, 2014

Thanks to a thirty-year community conservation program in the remote mountains of Pakistan, a key population of the straight-horned markhor, a type of wild mountain goat, has made a remarkable recovery to the point where the subspecies’ status is being reduced from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the Service announced today in a final rule. Today, the population numbers in excess of 3,500 as a result of the Torghar Conservation Project that uses limited trophy hunting as a means to raise critically needed funds for markhor conservation, while improving habitat for both markhor and domestic livestock and improving the economic conditions for the local tribal community.

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FAQs »»

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Straight-horned markhor. Credit: Peter Hopper / Creative Commons
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New sand is deposited onto badly eroded beaches on New Jersey's Delaware Bay. Credit: Eric Schrading / USFWS
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Two Year Later: Projects After Sandy Make Coastal Areas More Resilient to Future Storms

October 14, 2014

Since Hurricane Sandy roared ashore in 2012, the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of the Interior have worked with partners to restore and strengthen coastal areas to help local communities as well as wildlife better withstand future storms. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today toured restoration projects at Reed's Beach and Cape May National Wildlife Refuge. Overall, the Department of the Interior is investing $787 million on recovery and resiliency projects up and down the Atlantic Coast in the aftermath of Sandy. 

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Open Spaces Blog »»

Photos of New Jersey Beach Restoration »»

New sand is deposited onto badly eroded beaches on New Jersey's Delaware Bay. Credit: Eric Schrading / USFWS
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Thousands of walruses gather to rest on the shore in September 2013. Credit: Ryan Kingsbery / USGS
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Massive Number of Walruses Haul Out on Shore as Sea Ice Melts

October 10, 2014

Retreating summer sea ice in the Chuchki Sea has caused thousands of Pacific walruses to amass on one Alaska beach. This so-called “haul-out” phenomenon is becoming more common as global temperatures rise and walruses are forced to seek out land to rest, leaving them vulnerable to human-caused disturbances that can result in stampedes deadly to walruses. The Service works on outreach, so the public knows the danger of disturbing the walruses and asks that pilots keep their distance as walruses can be distressed by engine noise.

Learn More about this Event from the U.S. Geological Survey »»

Learn More about Pacific Walrus and Conservation Work »»

NBC News Coverage »»

Thousands of walruses gather to rest on the shore in September 2013. Credit: Ryan Kingsbery / USGS
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A patrol dog, handler and ranger demonstrate their abilities to track a mock poacher in Ol Jogi, Kenya. Credit: USFWS
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In Dogged Pursuit of Poachers: Canines Combat Wildlife Crime in Africa

October 7, 2014

Since 1999, the Service has supported conservation dog projects in five African countries to combat wildlife poaching and trafficking.

Open Spaces blog »»

A patrol dog, handler and ranger demonstrate their abilities to track a mock poacher in Ol Jogi, Kenya. Credit: USFWS
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Coral Reef at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Jim Maragos / USFWS
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Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument Grows

October 6, 2014

Protecting vital marine habitat in the Pacific Ocean, President Obama has expanded the existing Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, which has seven national wildlife refuges at its core. Service Director Dan Ashe recalls the “small group of thoughtful, committed citizens” who envisioned the protection of this pristine haven for wildlife.

News Release »»

Director’s Blog »»

Coral Reef at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Jim Maragos / USFWS
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A milkweed pod opens in fall at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge in West Virginia to reveal its silk and seeds. Collecting and planting the seeds can help monarch butterflies. Credit: Marvin DeJong
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Monarch Butterflies are in Trouble, so Plant Milkweed

October 3, 2014

Monarch butterflies are struggling. Counts of the familiar orange-and-black insects, admired for their flights of up to thousands of miles a year, are trending down so sharply that their migration is now under threat. That means fewer monarchs to inspire wonder, feed invertebrates and warn of habitat changes that may imperil other pollinators. So how can we help? One simple way is to collect and sow milkweed seeds.

 

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A milkweed pod opens in fall at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge in West Virginia to reveal its silk and seeds. Collecting and planting the seeds can help monarch butterflies. Credit: Marvin DeJong
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The projects in the Taking Action progress report “represent real progress,” Service Deputy Director Rowan Gould says. Credit: USFWS
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Agencies ‘Taking Action’ on Climate Change; Read How

September 26, 2014

A new report tells how state, federal and tribal agencies are rising to the challenge of climate change. The Taking Action progress report highlights 50 projects throughout the country that address the natural resource impacts of climate change.

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The projects in the Taking Action progress report “represent real progress,” Service Deputy Director Rowan Gould says. Credit: USFWS
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