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Podcasts / Vidcast

Historic 1920's photo of Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery.  Photo Credit:  USFWS.Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery Celebrates a Century of Conservation Podcast #9 of 9 - (Interview) -- Mules and pond scoops led the way with the first excavation work to build the Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery 100 years ago this month. Today the hatchery is an integral part of the community in Orangeburg, South Carolina and has served a critical role in fisheries conservation in the Southeast. Listen to the interview with hatchery manager Willie Booker, as he describes the work that Orangeburg does and invites the public to attend a special centennial celebration event on September 28, 2011.

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Sockey salmon. Credit USFWSFisheries Program at Work in the Last Frontier - Part Two - (Interview) -- Thriving native fish populations play a central role in Alaska's ecosystems, economy and way of life. Tune in to the final series of interviews with the Service's Fisheries Program in Alaska and learn how they contribute to the state's fish and fish habitat resources to ensure healthy fish populations for generations to come. A commercial fisherman from the Bristol Bay region lends insight into the importance of Bristol Bay salmon; a researcher likens habitat conservation to stock portfolios; and a variety of Alaska-based U.S. Fish and Wildlife fish experts explain how critical it is to allow fish free access to all habitats between mountain headwaters and the sea.

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Sockey salmon. Credit USFWSFisheries Program at Work in the Last Frontier : Podcast #8A of 9 - (Interview) -- Thriving native fish populations play a central role in Alaska's ecosystems, economy and way of life. Tune in to the first of two interviews with the Service's Fisheries Program in Alaska and learn how they contribute to the state's fish and fish habitat resources to ensure healthy fish populations for generations to come. A commercial fisherman from the Bristol Bay region lends insight into the importance of Bristol Bay salmon; a researcher likens habitat conservation to stock portfolios; and a variety of Alaska-based U.S. Fish and Wildlife fish experts explain how critical it is to allow fish free access to all habitats between mountain headwaters and the sea.

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Quilcene staff handling fish. Credit: Larry Telles / USFWSQuilcene National Fish Hatchery Turns 100! : Podcast #7 of 9 - (Interview) -- This Saturday, August 20th, Quilcene National Fish Hatchery in Washington state will be celebrating 100 years of conservation. Quilcene has produced and raised coho, chum, pink, Chinook, and sockeye salmon; and brook, cutthroat and rainbow trout during the last century of operation. There is a public celebration this Saturday where attendees can tour the hatchery, see inside the fish marking trailer, and participate in numerous hands-on, family friendly activities.


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The Livingston Stone National Fish Hatchery is located at the foot of the Shasta Dam, North of Redding, California. Credit: USFWSChinook Salmon and Delta Smelt Get a Fin Up from Livingston Stone: Podcast #6 of 9 - (Interview) -- Livingston Stone National Fish Hatchery in Shasta Lake, California is one of 70 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish Hatcheries, and is a vital link in the chain for helping winter Chinook salmon increase their population. A federally endangered species, the work conducted by biologists at Livingston Stone is helping this fish make a comeback after decades of population decline. Listen to this interview with John Rueth, Assistant Hatchery Manager, about the work at the hatchery to conserve Chinook salmon and delta smelt.

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Students with the Mescalero Apache Tribe in New Mexico work at the Mescalero Fish Hatchery. Credit: USFWSFisheries Program Reaches Out to Native American Youth : Podcast #5 of 9 - (Interview) -- The Service's Fisheries Program is working with Native American youth at fish hatcheries, fish and wildlife conservation offices and fish technology centers through the Tribal Youth Conservation Corps and the Student Temporary Employment Program. Creating a partnership with local Tribes, field offices are able to accomplish management goals, teach valuable skills, and inspire the next generation of conservationists to pursue an education or career in natural resource management. Listen to this podcast, where we talk to Patrick Durham, Director of Native American Programs for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and 2 participants.

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D. C. Booth Hatchery emblemD.C. Booth: Conserving the History of the Service's Fisheries Program Podcast #4 of 9 – (Interview) D.C. Booth Historic National Fish Hatchery and Archives in South Dakota is one of the oldest operating hatcheries in the country. Formerly the Spearfish National Fish Hatchery, it was constructed to propagate, stock, and establish trout populations in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Still rearing trout for the Black Hills, the hatchery also serves to protect and preserve fishery records and artifacts for educational, research, and historic purposes, and provide interpretive and educational programs for the public. Listen to this podcast interview with Carlos Martinez, Director of D.C. Booth Historic National Fish Hatchery, and Randi Smith, Museum Curator.




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Sturgeon Swimming. Credit:  Robert Elliott / USFWSGreat Lakes Giant is Making a Comeback - Fisheries Podcast #3 of 9 - (Video) -- A great fish - the lake sturgeon can grow to be nine feet long and weigh more than 300 pounds. Over-harvesting, habitat loss, and dams preventing them from reaching their spawning grounds have taken a tremendous toll on these preshistoric-looking creatures. Learn about the plight of the lake sturgeon and how the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's partnerships with Tribes, including White Earth and Menominee, and state natural resource agencies are helping rehabilitate the species through stocking efforts, research projects, fish passage and habitat restoration.

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Mora National Fish Hatchery and Technology Center in New Mexico. Credit: USFWSFisheries Podcasts Continue - Podcast #2 of 9 - (Interview) -- This week, our podcast comes from the Southwest region, and talks about modernizing seven National Fish Hatcheries and Technology Centers to maximize efficiency for fish production and minimize their carbon footprint.

 

 

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Thumbnail shot of FHC Fish Passage video. Credit: USFWS140th Anniversary of the Fisheries Program - (Video) -- To celebrate the 140th Anniversary of the Service's Fisheries Program, we'll post 1 podcast per week to the Service's webpage and Podcast Central page from each region. The first story is from the Northeast Region, and talks about the importance of fish passage projects to connect vital habitat for the endangered Atlantic salmon in Maine.

 


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Last updated: September 23, 2011
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