Gulf of Maine Coastal Program
Northeast Region
 

News and announcements

2012 Archives


Cape Elizabeth Land Trust buys Robinson Woods II

Cape Elizabeth Land Trust logo.
Cape Elizabeth Land Trust logo.

November 20, 2012

"The Cape Elizabeth Land Trust (CELT), a non-profit organization committed to the conservation and stewardship of distinctive lands cherished by the Cape Elizabeth community, today announced that it has acquired a conservation parcel known as Robinson Woods II for $1.1 million from the Robinson Family, LLC."

Over the years, Gulf of Maine Coastal Program has helped with this parcel by providing habitat information for several grants.

Read the full story on the CELT website

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Group sues Maine over passage of St. Croix alewives

Screen shot of article in The Portland Press Herald.
Article inThe Portland Press Herald.

October 15, 2012

The controversial issue of restoring alewives to the St. Croix River continues.

 

Read the article

 

Other recent news about the St. Croix

State supports restoring alewives to the St. Croix River
Watch a Passamaquoddy Tribe video about the St. Croix alewives

 

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Restoring fish access to 535 acres of lake habitat

Map of project area and Flanders Stream watershed.
Project area and Flanders Stream watershed.
Click map to enlarge.

September 12, 2012

Project Coordinator:
Sandra Lary
207-781-8364 x19
sandra_lary@fws.gov

Town of Sullivan, ME.

Gulf of Maine Coastal Program will complete a 5-year project on Flanders Stream that will restore access to 535 acres of lake habitat, and 3 miles of riverine habitat for native amphibians and reptiles, as well as sea-run alewives, American eel, brook trout and sea lamprey. GOMCP biologist, Sandra Lary, has spent several years assessing, planning, designing, permitting, funding, and partnering for this project.

The project restores connectivity in Flanders Stream by removing the one barrier that exists in the watershed between Flanders Pond and coastal Flanders Bay. The barrier is a stream channel ledge that was modified to accommodate a road crossing, perched culvert and deteriorated 1960's fish ladder. Since the stream channel consists of blasted ledge, access to upstream spawning habitat was accomplished by installing a bottomless arch culvert (required for the road crossing) with a nature-like fish passage structure on the downstream end of the culvert to allow for upstream and downstream passage through the culvert.

The project also improves overall river connectivity, ecological function, and productivity in the watershed, and downstream to the coastal habitats of Flanders Bay, Frenchman Bay and the Gulf of Maine through the increased exchange of biota, nutrients and sediment.

Flanders Stream watershed supports native sea-run fish, including alewife, blueback herring, American eel, sea lamprey and sea-run brook trout. The watershed is located within the Gulf of Maine Atlantic salmon downeast coastal SHRU (salmon habitat recovery unit).

The watershed is located within the downeast area where endangered Atlantic salmon DPS (distinct population segments) occur. Increased populations of alewife may provide prey and buffering benefits to salmon recovery efforts. Recovery of native forage and buffer species, such as those found in Flanders Stream, has been identified as an integral part of the Atlantic salmon recovery effort.

The culvert road crossing and rock ramp will be maintained by the Town of Sullivan and Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR). The road crossing is the only access road to landowners and residents on Thorne Road which the Town of Sullivan has always and will continue to maintain. DMR-Bureau of Sea-Run Fisheries and Habitat, headquartered in Hallowell, ME, has staff in nearby Jonesboro to oversee the care and maintenance of fishways in downeast Maine. Local supporters of alewife restoration will also assist in the maintenance of the fish passage structure.

Construction Photos
Credit: Sandra Lary/USFWS
Click on the images to enlarge.

August 8, 2012
Photo of construction. Photo of construction.
August 15, 2012
Photo of a rusty culvert. Photo of construction.
August 30, 2012
Photo of construction. Photo of construction.
September 7, 2012
Photo of construction. Photo of construction.

This project supports and complements many ongoing efforts by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), DMR, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other partners in the downeast region to restore the federally listed endangered Atlantic salmon. Additionally, sea-run alewife and American eel are two species in decline throughout their range that are currently under consideration for Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing. Shortnose sturgeon, striped bass, mackerel, bluefish, and several groundfish species may benefit as a result of increased productivity of forage fish and invertebrate species in Flanders Bay, Frenchman Bay and the Gulf of Maine. Other species that will benefit from the project include inland and coastal species including amphibians and reptiles, birds of prey, marine birds and mammals, and groundfish. Restoring access to Flanders Stream watershed spawning and nursery habitat will benefit these species and improve the health of the Gulf of Maine coastal ecosystem.

Bangor Daily News article
Download "Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity"

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Stream Restoration Initiative (on MPBN)

Picture of stream survey technicians measuring a culvert.
Stream survey technicians measure a culvert.
Credit: Mao Teng Lin/USFWS

August 31, 2012

Every time a road crosses a stream, a bridge or culvert makes that crossing possible. Alex Abbott, a fish passage specialist with Gulf of Maine Coastal Program, describes why it's important to have the right size and type of culvert, and why it's critical to install it properly.

 

Hear the story on MPBN
Download "Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity"

 

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GOMC-NOAA announce new habitat restoration grants

Gulf of Maine Council header.
Gulf of Maine Council header.

August 24, 2012

The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment and the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service announced in August that seven new projects in the Gulf of Maine will receive support from the GOMC-NOAA Community-Based Habitat Restoration Partnership. GOMCP was involved in several of these projects.

Read the full story

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State supports restoring alewives to the St. Croix River

Illustration of an alewife.
Alewife illustration. Credit: Duane Raver/USFWS

August 8, 2012

Sandra Lary participates on the Interagency International St. Croix Alewife Restoration Team with multiple partners to find a resolution to the controversial issue of restoring alewives to the St. Croix River. Recently, Gov. Paul LePage committed to a controlled reintroduction of alewives to the river.

Read the full story
Watch a Passamaquoddy Tribe video about the St. Croix alewives

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Royal River restoration

Screen shot of article in The Portland Press Herald.
Article in The Portland Press Herald.

August 1, 2012

Jed Wright assists with a small dam removal project on the Royal River in Yarmouth, ME. The web version of this story includes a video that features Jed operating a grip hoist.

 

 

Read the full story

 

 

 

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Reviving a river: From the coast

Picture of a stream survey technician.
Stream survey technician. Credit: USFWS

June 18, 2012

Jed Wright describes Gulf of Maine Coastal Program's role in the Penobscot River Restoration Project for the Northeast Ecological Services "Follow the Mission" blog. Jed's post is part of a series of blog posts on fish passage.

 

Read the blog post
Visit the website for the Penobscot River Restoration Trust

 

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GOMCP advises Oman in managing coastal nature reserves

Picture of Ras al Jinz Nature Reserve in Oman.
Ras al Jinz Nature Reserve, Oman.
Credit: Stewart Fefer/USFWS

February 6, 2012

Gulf of Maine Coastal Program's Project Leader, Stewart Fefer, and Acadia National Park’s Chief of Resource Management, David Manski, are working with the Department of Interior International Technical Assistance Program (ITAP) to help build capacity for managing nature reserves in Oman. Through funding from the Department of State’s Middle East Partnership Initiative, ITAP has visited Oman six times since 2009 to assess current management of key nature reserves.

Read the full story

 

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GOMCP leads stream-smart road crossing workshops

Picture of people surrounding a set of culverts.
Culvert training. Credit: NRCS

January 13, 2012

Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff are supporting a statewide effort in Maine to educate professionals responsible for road-stream crossings on how to improve stream habitat by creating better crossings.

 

Read the full story
Download "Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity"

 

 

 

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Last updated: September 5, 2013

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