Gulf of Maine Coastal Program
Northeast Region
 

Fact sheets, reports, and links

The list below includes fact sheets, written reports and publications that our staff has produced, helped partners produce, and a select list of other publications that you may find helpful in supporting specific habitat protection and restoration activities.

Please note that we are in the process of transitioning and updating this list and the fact sheets listed here.

Gulf of Maine Coastal Program fact sheets

Gulf of Maine Coastal Program sheets provide overviews of high priority office activities.

Other fact sheets, reports, and links

This category directs you to issues, initiatives or species of importance for our work and work of our conservation partners. Written materials are organized into categories identified below; some of the written materials overlap categories, and will therefore be listed in multiple categories. Some of the written materials are short, some are longer reports, and some are available on websites; different materials target different audiences--resource managers, community activists, GIS specialists, or academic/technical audiences.

Habitat protection

Habitat restoration

Habitat identification and assessment

Atlantic salmon

Other diadromous fish

Coastal wetlands


Habitat protection

  • Gulf of Maine Watershed Habitat Analysis
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund Overviews, 2006 and 2007
    Our Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff helps coordinate and manage the Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund, a large grant program funded from 2000 - 2006 through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. In 2007, the Fund has been funded directly through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Fund supports voluntary community-based initiatives that help permanently protect Atlantic salmon watersheds, restore degraded habitat, build organizational capacity, conduct outreach, support applied research, and encourage best management practices of local industries that may impact salmon habitat. Our staff helps identify funding priorities and frequently provides technical expertise in identifying, designing and implementing high priority projects. These publications, produced in 2006 and 2007, describe and summarize our work with locally-based conservation groups, state agencies, industries and landowners to recover wild Atlantic salmon in Maine.
  • Maine Coastal Nesting Islands
  • Beginning With Habitat
    Beginning With Habitat is a statewide initiative actively supported by our office, that provides mapped information on important habitat with town officials and local land trusts in order to guide local efforts to conserve Maine’s natural landscape. Beginning with Habitat provides information on habitat from a variety of sources, identifying: riparian corridors rare plants and high value natural communities, identified by Maine Natural Areas Program high value wildlife habitat for specific species or groups of species, based on site surveys conducted by Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife important habitat for the 91 species included in our U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gulf of Maine Watershed Habitat Analysis, based on habitat modeling unfragmented blocks of habitat, public and conservation lands, watersheds, and wetlands.
  • Maine Coast Protection Initiative
    The Maine Coast Protection Initiative (MCPI) was established with funds from the Land Trust Alliance and NOAA to increase the pace and quality of land protection by enhancing the capacity of Maine’s conservation community to preserve the unique character of the Maine coast for the benefit of the people of Maine and beyond. Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff is currently active on the Executive Committee, Steering Committee, GIS Committee, and the Communications Workgroup.
  • Presumpscot River Management Plan
    A comprehensive report was created over a three-year period by Land and Water Consultants, Inc., working in coordination with a diverse group of river of stakeholders. First envisioned and promoted by Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff, then funded and managed through the Casco Bay Estuary Partnership, the report provides a clear vision and recommendations in three areas: Fisheries, Cumulative Impacts, and Open Space.
  • Maine Wetland Protection Coalition
  • Diadromous Fish Habitat Protection & Restoration in Maine (PDF 1.79 MB)
    This illustrated 14-page briefing, developed by our office, provides an overview of the habitat protection and restoration projects our office has actively participated in accomplishing from 1998 - 2007.
  • Coastal Choices videos
    You can download these five inspiring conservation success stories and listen to them as five separate six to eight minute-long videos. All five videos are supplemented with two-page companion pieces that direct you to additional web resources. This project, intended to encourage people to work together to protect our coastal heritage, was made possible largely with a funds provided by the Maine Coast Protection Initiative, supplemented with additional dollars contributed by our Gulf of Maine Coastal Program and other partners. Coastal Choices was prepared by Maine Coast Heritage Trust and Cross Current Productions, with assistance from eight partnering organizations, including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gulf of Maine Coastal Program. The five stories are:
    1. Wild Island: Sustaining a legacy of conservation on Monhegan
    2. Unchartered Waters: Saving a working waterfront in York
    3. Learning Ground: Linking school and community in Lubec
    4. Spawning Hope: Collaborating to conserve mid-coast river
    5. Healthy Trails: Connecting people and parks in Portland

Habitat restoration

  • Maine Atlantic Salmon
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund Overviews, 2006 and 2007
    Our Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff helps coordinate and manage the Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund, a large grant program funded from 2000 - 2006 through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. In 2007, the Fund has been funded directly through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Fund supports voluntary community-based initiatives that help permanently protect Atlantic salmon watersheds, restore degraded habitat, build organizational capacity, conduct outreach, support applied research, and encourage best management practices of local industries that may impact salmon habitat. Our staff helps identify funding priorities and frequently provides technical expertise in identifying, designing and implementing high priority projects. These publications, produced in 2006 and 2007, describe and summarize our work with locally-based conservation groups, state agencies, industries and landowners to recover wild Atlantic salmon in Maine.
  • Maine Coastal Nesting Islands
  • Presumpscot River Management Plan
    A comprehensive report was created over a three-year period by Land and Water Consultants, Inc., working in coordination with a diverse group of river of stakeholders. First envisioned and promoted by Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff, then funded and managed through the Casco Bay Estuary Partnership, the report provides a clear vision and recommendations in three areas: Fisheries, Cumulative Impacts, and Open Space.
  • Phragmites: Questions & Answers (PDF 276 KB)
    Non-native Phrgmites is an aggressive, perennial grass that outcompetes native wetland plants and animals. This 5-page fact sheet produced by our U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, provides an overview of resource management issues pertaining to the expansion, management and control of non-native Phragmites in Maine.
  • Diadromous Fish Habitat Protection & Restoration in Maine (PDF 1.79 MB)
    This illustrated 14-page briefing, developed by our U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, provides an overview of the habitat protection and restoration projects our office has actively participated in accomplishing from 1998 - 2007.
  • Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity (8.5x11 format, PDF 1.27 MB)
    This fact sheet, originally designed as a folder, summarizes the proper sizing and installation of stream crossings so that streams can function naturally and fish and wildlife can freely migrate.To facilitate printing, an 11x17 version (PDF 1.07 MB) is also available. Two fact sheets that would normally be inserted into the folder are also available for download: Projects Completed in Maine (PDF 737 KB) and For More Information/Grant Opportunities (PDF 525 KB).

Habitat identification and assessment

  • Gulf of Maine Watershed Habitat Analysis
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Atlas
  • Maine Coastal Nesting Islands
  • Beginning With Habitat
    Beginning With Habitat is a statewide initiative actively supported by our office, that provides mapped information on important habitat with town officials and local land trusts in order to guide local efforts to conserve Maine’s natural landscape. Beginning with Habitat provides information on habitat from a variety of sources, identifying: riparian corridors rare plants and high value natural communities, identified by Maine Natural Areas Program high value wildlife habitat for specific species or groups of species, based on site surveys conducted by Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife important habitat for the 91 species included in our U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gulf of Maine Watershed Habitat Analysis, based on habitat modeling unfragmented blocks of habitat, public and conservation lands, watersheds, and wetlands.

Atlantic salmon

  • Maine's Wild Atlantic Salmon (PDF 112 KB)
  • Salmon slideshow
  • Identifying and Assessing Atlantic Salmon habitat
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund Overviews, 2006 and 2007
    Our Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff helps coordinate and manage the Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund, a large grant program funded from 2000 - 2006 through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. In 2007, the Fund has been funded directly through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Fund supports voluntary community-based initiatives that help permanently protect Atlantic salmon watersheds, restore degraded habitat, build organizational capacity, conduct outreach, support applied research, and encourage best management practices of local industries that may impact salmon habitat. Our staff helps identify funding priorities and frequently provides technical expertise in identifying, designing and implementing high priority projects. These publications, produced in 2006 and 2007, describe and summarize our work with locally-based conservation groups, state agencies, industries and landowners to recover wild Atlantic salmon in Maine.
  • Hydraulic Geometry Relations for Rivers in Central and Coastal Maine
    This technical report describes the methodology and results of instream assessments that can help natural-resources managers conduct successful river restoration projects in coastal and central Maine. By understanding natural bounds of variation in the geomorphology of Maine’s rivers, restoration practitioners can better design future restoration projects. Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff played a lead role in initiating this applied research project and in collecting data.
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Atlas
  • Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Fund
  • Diadromous Fish Habitat Protection & Restoration in Maine (PDF 1.79 MB)
    This illustrated 14-page briefing, developed by our U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, provides an overview of the habitat protection and restoration projects our office has actively participated in accomplishing from 1998 - 2007.
  • Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity (8.5x11 format, PDF 1.27 MB)
    This fact sheet, originally designed as a folder, summarizes the proper sizing and installation of stream crossings so that streams can function naturally and fish and wildlife can freely migrate.To facilitate printing, an 11x17 version (PDF 1.07 MB) is also available. Two fact sheets that would normally be inserted into the folder are also available for download: Projects Completed in Maine (PDF 737 KB) and For More Information/Grant Opportunities (PDF 525 KB).

Other diadromous fish

  • Presumpscot River Management Plan
    A comprehensive report was created over a three-year period by Land and Water Consultants, Inc., working in coordination with a diverse group of river of stakeholders. First envisioned and promoted by Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff, then funded and managed through the Casco Bay Estuary Partnership, the report provides a clear vision and recommendations in three areas: Fisheries, Cumulative Impacts, and Open Space.
  • All About Maine Alewives (PDF 130 KB)
    This five-page fact sheet, developed by our U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, Maine Rivers, and the Maine Department of Marine Resources, describes natural history information relevant for those interested in alewife restoration in Maine’s lakes and ponds.
  • Sea Lamprey White Paper (PDF 2.9 MB)
    This 25-page report by a respected Maine fisheries biologist, supported with funds from the Maine Atlantic Salmon Conservation Grant and reviewed and edited with technical support from our staff and other partners, collates natural history information on native sea lamprey in Maine. The report clearly documents the positive contributions of sea lamprey in Maine waters, distinguishing our native sea lamprey from introduced sea lamprey in the Great Lakes, thus dispelling unfounded myths about Maine’s sea lamprey.
  • USFWS Connecticut River Coordinator's website
    The website summarizes important information on the distribution, life history, distribution, status and restoration efforts for native sea lamprey.
  • MDOT Fish Passage Policy and Design Guidelines
    This 68-page document, developed by a multi-agency task force, establishes guidelines to achieve safe, cost-effective fish passage at water-crossings, such as bridges or culverts. This document was specifically developed for Maine Department of Transportation but can be used by others, and can help fish passage advocates ensure that appropriate procedures are followed in creating or repairing stream crossings. Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff provided significant support in developing and revising these guidelines.
  • St. Croix Alewives Studies (PDF 1.96 MB) and Maine Rivers St. Croix Advocacy
    Maine Rivers, a non-government conservation organization, coordinated the fundraising and publication in 2007 of two research studies as part of a multi-year, multi-agency initiative to build our scientific understanding of native, anadromous alewives in the St. Croix River watershed. Gulf of Maine Coastal Program was represented on the Scientific Advisory Committee and provided federal funding through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Maine Habitat Protection Partnership. Many other federal, state, provincial agencies, non-government organizations and foundations contributed technical expertise and funding. These reports will contribute reliable science to restoration and management decision-making related to alewife restoration in this international watershed on the Maine-New Brunswick border. The two studies included in this report are: St. Croix River Alewife-Smallmouth Bass Interaction Study, By T.V. Willis (42 pages) Geneteic Analyses of Freshwater and Anadromous Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) Populations from the St. Croix River, Maine/New Brunswick, by P. Bentzen and I.G. Paterson (23 pages)
  • Maine's Diadromous Fish Community (PDF 980 KB)
    This 11-page report by Rory Saunders, Michael A. Hachey, and Clem W. Fay describes the important roles that co-evolved diadromous fish (including alewives, blueback herring, American shad, rainbow smelt and sea lamprey) may play in key life history events of Atlantic salmon northeastern U.S. rivers. This important report makes a strong case for the importance of multi-species management and an ecosystem approach in restoring endangered species, including Atlantic salmon.
  • American eel: Restoring a vanishing resource in the Gulf of Maine
    This 12-page report provides an excellent and comprehensive introduction to American eels in the Gulf of Maine -- their biology, life cycle, migratory pathways, and threats to their well-being. The report concludes with a discussion of habitat protection and restoration strategies and a discussion of the future outlook for American eels. Edited, illustrated, and designed by Ethan Nadeau as a publication of the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment, 2007.
  • Diadromous Fish Habitat Protection & Restoration in Maine (PDF 1.79 MB)
    This illustrated 14-page briefing, developed by our U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, provides an overview of the habitat protection and restoration projects our office has actively participated in accomplishing from 1998 - 2007.
  • Maine Stream Crossings: New Designs to Restore Continuity (8.5x11 format, PDF 1.27 MB)
    This fact sheet, originally designed as a folder, summarizes the proper sizing and installation of stream crossings so that streams can function naturally and fish and wildlife can freely migrate.To facilitate printing, an 11x17 version (PDF 1.07 MB) is also available. Two fact sheets that would normally be inserted into the folder are also available for download: Projects Completed in Maine (PDF 737 KB) and For More Information/Grant Opportunities (PDF 525 KB).

Coastal wetlands

  • Scarborough Marsh Restoration Plan
    This 66-page report identified and ranked salt marsh restoration opportunities in Maine’s largest (3,000 acre) salt marsh. This document has served as a guide in prioritizing and implementing multiple salt marsh restoration projects in Scarborough Marsh Wildlife Management Area. Our Gulf of Maine Coastal Program staff provided significant support in developing this report and in implementing salt marsh restoration projects in Scarborough Marsh.
  • Phragmites: Questions & Answers (PDF 276 KB)
    Non-native Phrgmites is an aggressive, perennial grass that outcompetes native wetland plants and animals. This 5-page fact sheet produced by our U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Coastal Program office, provides an overview of resource management issues pertaining to the expansion, management and control of non-native Phragmites in Maine.
  • Assessing Habitat Selection by Foraging Egrets in Salt marshes (PDF 148 KB)
    This 6-page research paper by Carol Lynn Trocki and Peter W.C. Paton and published by The Society of Wetland Scientists in their technical bulletin, "Wetlands," recognizes that pool habitat for foraging egrets appears to be a limiting factor on salt marshes. The report concludes that carefully designed salt marsh restoration projects can benefit local egret populations by increasing the availablility of pool and open water habitat, reducing Phragmites and modifying deep ditches and channels to make them more accessible to foraging waterbirds.
   
Last updated: September 5, 2013

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