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Chesapeake Bay Field Office Finds “Foster Homes” for Osprey Chicks
Northeast Region, August 3, 2012
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Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc volunteer, Suzi Feldhuhn, transfers osprey chick to Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists Robbie Callahan and Pete McGowan
Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc volunteer, Suzi Feldhuhn, transfers osprey chick to Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists Robbie Callahan and Pete McGowan - Photo Credit: Chris Guy, USFWS
Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologist, Pete McGowan, checks potential osprey foster nest
Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologist, Pete McGowan, checks potential osprey foster nest - Photo Credit: Chris Guy, USFWS
Foster osprey chick (with band) in foster nest with similarly aged chick
Foster osprey chick (with band) in foster nest with similarly aged chick - Photo Credit: Pete McGowan, USFWS

Life isn’t always easy for osprey chicks on the Chesapeake Bay. Often storms and other phenomenon displace the young birds from their nests. Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists working on the Paul S. Sarbanes Ecosystem Restoration Project at Poplar Island (Poplar Island) wildlife management team coordinate with Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. to put displaced osprey chicks into suitable foster nests.

 

In June 2012, three young ospreys, approximately 4-5 weeks old, were delivered by Suzi Feldhuhn, Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. volunteer, to the Poplar Island wildlife management team for relocation into suitably-aged osprey foster nests on Poplar Island and the South River, near Annapolis, MD.

To reduce holding times and therefore stress on the foster chicks the wildlife management team conducted reconnaissance of several osprey nests in the above locations the day before the relocation. On July 23, 2012 another young osprey, 6 weeks old, was received from Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. and relocated into a foster nest on Poplar Island.

Subsequent monitoring of the foster nests showed that all four foster chicks had fledged. The team has successfully relocated 11 osprey young between 2009 and 2012.

For more information contact:
Pete McGowan
410/573-4523
peter_c_mcgowan@fws.gov


Contact Info: Kathryn Reshetiloff, 410-573-4582, kathryn_reshetiloff@fws.gov



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