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Chesapeake Bay Field Office Partnerships to Benefit Trust Fish Species in Virginia
Northeast Region, April 12, 2011
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Mossy Creek dam, Ben Hutzell, USFWS
Mossy Creek dam, Ben Hutzell, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Another view of Mossy Creek dam, Ben Hutzell, USFWS
Another view of Mossy Creek dam, Ben Hutzell, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Degraded stream channel at Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery, Ben Hutzell, USFWS
Degraded stream channel at Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery, Ben Hutzell, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Another view of degraded channel at Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery, Ben Hutzell, USFWS
Another view of degraded channel at Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery, Ben Hutzell, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a

Mossy Creek Dam Removal & Stream Restoration

Mossy Creek flows from its spring source in Augusta County, Virginia into the North River, which flows into the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and ultimately enters the Chesapeake Bay. 

 

Mossy Creek has been one of the premier trout streams of Virginia due mostly to the fact that as much as 80% of its base flow is derived from cold water springs providing the water temperature necessary for trout survival.  It is a classic meadow limestone stream and Virginia's best known spring fed creek.

 

A derelict dam located downstream of the Route 809 bridge on Mossy Creek has been partially breached but still constricts and alters water levels and fish passage. Partners including Trout Unlimited, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Fisheries Coordinator Office will remove the dam and restore 2,500 linear feet of stream both upstream and downstream of the Route 809 Bridge to a stable, self-maintaining state.

 

This will significantly increase the amount of available aquatic habitat and help promote a sustainable brook trout population as well as other resident fish and aquatic species. Through stabilization of stream banks, sedimentation into Mossy Creek will also be reduced as well as in local watersheds and the Chesapeake Bay.

 

This project will draw on the experience and expertise of federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations and local volunteers to design, construct, monitor and maintain the restored area. Chesapeake Bay Field Office will provide the technical support to engineer the stream restoration. The project has almost been fully funded with grants from Chesapeake Bay Trust, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation as well as in-kind contributions from Trout Unlimited and Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. 

 

Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery Stream Restoration

Chesapeake Bay Field Office stream restoration biologists recently met with Service's Virginia Fisheries coordinator and Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery manager to discuss conceptual plans and funding opportunities to restore up to 1,000 feet of degraded channel on federal hatchery property. Chesapeake Bay Field Office will provide the technical support to engineer the stream restoration which when complete will increase vital habitat for fishes of concern, particularly American shad. The project will also reduce sedimentation currently flowing into the James River and the Chesapeake Bay.

 

For more information on these initiatives, contact:

Rich Starr

Rich_starr@fws.gov

410/573-4583


Contact Info: Kathryn Reshetiloff, 410-573-4582, kathryn_reshetiloff@fws.gov



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