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Chesapeake Bay Blog Features Biologists in the Field
Northeast Region, March 10, 2011
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Weather Can Turn Suddenly on the Chesapeake Bay, USFWS
Weather Can Turn Suddenly on the Chesapeake Bay, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Suited up for winter field work, USFWS
Suited up for winter field work, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Working on a frozen marsh, USFWS
Working on a frozen marsh, USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a

People love to be out on the Chesapeake Bay most of the year, but few experience the field work during the freezing months of winter. ChesapeakeBay.net blog features Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists Chris Guy and Pete McGowan discussing benefits of working outside and on the water during the coldest time of the year. Some of the advantages include: open areas clear of thick vegetation and annoying insects; low boat traffic; and interesting wildlife. Of course there are hazards like the ever present danger of hypothermia and ice blocked waterways, and inconveniences like equipment not working well in cold temperatures and wearing layer upon layer of clothing and cumbersome survival suits.

 

But being out in the field on a crisp winter day provides opportunities to stop and take note of the environment and wildlife like a marsh hawk looking for field mice and voles, a bald eagle perching on an osprey nest, the occasional sighting of a snowy owl and, of course, the thousands of waterfowl that winter on the Chesapeake Bay. 

 

To read more about Chesapeake Bay Field Office biologists in the field, check out: http://blog.chesapeakebay.net


Contact Info: Kathryn Reshetiloff, 410-573-4582, kathryn_reshetiloff@fws.gov



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