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Help Wanted: Citizen Scientists
Midwest Region, June 25, 2013
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Hexagenia mayfly nymphs excavate U-shaped burrows in silt laden sediment of the Upper Mississippi River where they live for one or more years.
Hexagenia mayfly nymphs excavate U-shaped burrows in silt laden sediment of the Upper Mississippi River where they live for one or more years. - Photo Credit: USFWS photo by Cal Fremling
Biologist James Krysan examines Hexagenia bilineata mayflies attracted to automobile headlights on an Upper Mississippi River bridge at Winona, Minnesota, 8 July 1966.
Biologist James Krysan examines Hexagenia bilineata mayflies attracted to automobile headlights on an Upper Mississippi River bridge at Winona, Minnesota, 8 July 1966. - Photo Credit: USFWS photo by Cal Fremling
Emergent Hexagenia mayflies blanket road signs along the Upper Mississippi River, near Stoddard, Wisconsin.
Emergent Hexagenia mayflies blanket road signs along the Upper Mississippi River, near Stoddard, Wisconsin. - Photo Credit: USFWS photo
A swarm of emergent Hexagenia mayflies clings to vegetation along the banks of the Upper Mississippi River, near Stoddard, Wisconsin.
A swarm of emergent Hexagenia mayflies clings to vegetation along the banks of the Upper Mississippi River, near Stoddard, Wisconsin. - Photo Credit: USFWS photo

Have you ever wanted to take part in a science investigation?

 

Medical specialists often seek members of the public to voluntarily participate in trials to determine the effectiveness of new treatments and document health outcomes.

The La Crosse FWCO and several of its partners are likewise seeking help from those who work, commute, reside, or recreate along the Upper Mississippi River to voluntarily participate in efforts to monitor the seasonal pulse of Old Man River by observing and reporting mayfly emergence events that occur here throughout the summer.

These observations will form the core a citizen-scientist reporting network that will document the annual geographic range and relative abundance of burrowing mayflies, sentinels of the river’s environmental health.

Learn more about burrowing mayflies and becoming a citizen-scientist mayfly emergence observer at http: www.fws.gov/midwest/lacrossefisheries/mayfly.html



http://www.fws.gov/midwest/lacrossefisheries/mayfly.html
Contact Info: Mark Steingraeber, 608-783-8436, Mark_Steingraeber@fws.gov



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