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KLAMATH FALLS FWO: Klamath Falls Office Partnership Efforts Recognized by U.S. Forest Service
California-Nevada Offices , May 29, 2013
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Blake receiving the partnership award given to the Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office by the U.S. Forest Service.
Blake receiving the partnership award given to the Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office by the U.S. Forest Service. - Photo Credit: U.S. Forest Service
Completed project to replace a culvert with a bridge on the North Fork Sprague River.
Completed project to replace a culvert with a bridge on the North Fork Sprague River. - Photo Credit: U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Klamath Falls office received a U.S. Forest Service partnership award at the Forest Service’s annual regional meeting of fish and watershed program managers, held last month in Hood River, Oregon.

The recognition acknowledges the collaborative fisheries work of the Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office, and their Ecological Services and Partners for Fish and Wildlife programs, and is part of the Forest Service’s National Rise to the Future Watershed Resources Awards.

Phillip Gaines, fishery program manager for the Fremont-Winema National Forest, nominated the Klamath Falls FWO based on the “phenomenal success” he has experienced in working with various employees in both the Ecological Services and Partners for Fish and Wildlife programs.

“It’s a priority of mine to maintain these strong partnerships,” Gaines said.

The award nomination described the Klamath Falls FWO as being “highly networked with many of our external partners and stakeholders,” which allows for successful implementation of various watershed restoration projects. The approach has led to accomplishments “far outside of what the Forest could implement on its own,” the nomination said.

The nomination highlighted a number of restoration projects, specifically those targeting improvement of habitats and fish passage in the North Fork Sprague River and the Williamson River. Species of concern in these areas include the bull trout, a species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, and the redband trout.

“Working with the Forest Service, as well as our other partners to accomplish these projects, brings us one step closer to recovering listed species,” said Nolan Banish, fish biologist at the Klamath Falls FWO.

Dan Blake, assistant field manager at the Klamath Falls FWO, attended the awards ceremony to receive the award. At the meeting, he highlighted some of the work that has been achieved jointly by the two agencies. On the North Fork Sprague River, the cooperators replaced an undersized culvert with a bridge to give fish access to 100 miles of habitat that had been blocked.

Other projects included restoration of natural stream conditions to benefit spawning, fish passage, rearing, cover and water quality. Blake noted that partnerships help stretch funds, improve the technical design of projects, and build support for projects in the community.

Blake also highlighted a partnership with the Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust (KBRT), a non-profit organization based in Klamath Falls that conducts ecological restoration, monitoring, instream flow protection, and landowner assistance. KBRT works collaboratively with both the Klamath Falls FWO and the Fremont-Winema National Forest. KBRT also received a partnership award at the event.


Contact Info: Dan Blake, 541-885-2512, daniel_blake@fws.gov



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