Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Partnership Makes Myrtle Point Wetland Education Day a Success
Pacific Region, November 15, 2012
Print Friendly Version
Students were glad for the chance to warm up with (and learn about) hide blankets at the Wildlife Station with Robert Golden from the BLM.
Students were glad for the chance to warm up with (and learn about) hide blankets at the Wildlife Station with Robert Golden from the BLM. - Photo Credit: CWA
At the “BUG” station, Steve Pennington from the CWA taught the students how to conduct a DEQ Level I Macro-Invertebrate Assessment.
At the “BUG” station, Steve Pennington from the CWA taught the students how to conduct a DEQ Level I Macro-Invertebrate Assessment. - Photo Credit: CWA
At the bird watching station, students were taught about the significance of wetland restoration and bird habitats by Madeleine Vander Heyden from the USFWS & Keith Saylor, volunteer and local bird expert.
At the bird watching station, students were taught about the significance of wetland restoration and bird habitats by Madeleine Vander Heyden from the USFWS & Keith Saylor, volunteer and local bird expert. - Photo Credit: CWA

Coquille Watershed Association (CWA) - Myrtle Point Wetland Education Day

To mark the start of the CWA’s Myrtle Point Wetland Enhancement project, CWA held a Natural Resource Education Day for forty-three Myrtle Point and Powers High School students. Throughout the event, students learned about habitat restoration activities, native plant species, fish, wildlife and bird species within the wetland, macro-invertebrate identification and water quality. Although the rain threatened to ruin the fun, it was an extremely successful day.

Here are a few highlights from each station:

1) Wildlife – Led by Robert Golden, BLM. This station was extremely popular as Bob displayed his vast knowledge oflocal wildlife. The students were particularly pleased to warm up with thehide blankets.

2) Native Species Planting – Led by Bruce Follansbee, CWA Resource Advisor & Kristi Mergenthaler, Southern Oregon Land Conservancy.Together the students and volunteers planted 33 cottonwood, 7 ash, 5 dogwood, and 1 crabapple. Students learned about the importance of native species and the varieties of vegetative habitat in the wetland. Each plant required: scalping of reed canary grass,digging deep holes for the large container pots, planting native species, putting foil around the base of each plant to prevent girdlingand flagging each plant for future identification.

3) Bird Watching and Identification – Led by Madeleine Vander Heyden, USFWS Keith Saylor, volunteer and local bird expert.At the bird watching station, students were taught about the significance of wetland restoration and bird habitats. Madeleine and Keith discussed a variety of species and identified local birds using a scope and binoculars. Several frogs were identified, including one invasive species!

4) Fish Habitat – Led by Jeff Jackson, ODFWJeff showed students the different fish sampling techniques and discussed our local fish species, including the different types of salmon and invasive species within the Coquille Basin, and the habitat restoration activities that are needed for native species to flourish and thrive.

5) Macro-Invertebrates – Led by Steve Pennington, CWA Council Member and Educator. At the macro-invertebrate station, better known as the “BUG” station, Steve taught the students how to sample and identify species, and then the students conducted a DEQ Level I Macro-Invertebrate Assessment.

Everyone worked very hard to educate and teach future land stewards about natural resources. At the end of the day the student received bags loaded with natural resource information & goodies.


The Coquille Watershed Association
http://www.coquillewatershed.org/
Contact Info: Amanda Fortin, (503) 872-2852, amanda_fortin@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer