Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Partnership Stories Archive: 2011

The Endangered Species Program works formally and informally with a large variety of groups and individuals to further species conservation. Partnerships for protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species have been established between the Endangered Species Program and other U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service programs, other federal agencies, state governments, private landowners, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and American Indian tribes.



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Posted
12/29/11

Saving the Virgin Islands Tree Boa (1:01)

Partner: U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife

VI Boa trout

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 13, 1970
Scientific Name: Epicrates monensis granti

Description: The Virgin Islands tree boa is found only in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. A non-venomous snake, it can grow to about four feet in length.
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Posted
12/20/11

Gila Trout Stocked into Willow Creek (3:56)

Partners: State of New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, U.S. Forest Service

Gila trout

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Oncorhynchus gilae

Description: By the time the Gila trout was scientifically described in 1950, its distribution had been dramatically reduced to as few as 20 stream miles and a population of less than 8,000 individuals. Ongoing captive propagation and reintroduction efforts, aimed not only at increasing population numbers but also at preserving and replicating genetic lineages. In 2005, the USFWS stated their belief that the viability of the Gila trout was sufficiently protected and proposed downlisting the Gila tout to threatened. The proposed rule to downlist also proposes a special rule that will allow for some recreational fishing of the species.
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Posted
12/16/11

Panther Project: How We Collar a Florida Panther (3:58)

Partners: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Panther Project Team

Panther

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Puma concolor coryi

Description: Florida panthers once roamed throughout the entire Southeast from east Texas to the Atlantic and north to parts of Tennessee. Overhunting, loss of habitat, and reduction of their primary prey reduced their population to a remnant living on the southern tip of Florida.
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Posted
12/14/11

The Hunt for the Tiger Slayers (5:58)

Partners: Wildlife Conservation Society, Government of Thailand, Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation, Liz Claiborne and Art Ortenberg Foundation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Save the Tiger Fund, Natural History New Zealand, and WCS Indonesia Program

Tiger

Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Panthera tigris

Description: Wild tigers, once abundant throughout Asia, now live in small fragmented groups, mostly in protected forests, refuges, national parks and their corridors. Experts estimate that more than 500 tigers are killed each year.
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Posted
12/09/11

The Rediscovery of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (9:18)

Partners: Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission

Ivory-billed Woodpecker

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Campephilus principalis

Description: The Ivory-billed Woodpecker, considered to be extinct by many birders, was rediscovered on Cache River National Wildlife Refuge. The discovery is the result of a collaborative effort by The Nature Conservancy of Arkansas, Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, working together with Cornell Lab of Ornithology as the primary researcher to determine if the Ivory-billed Woodpecker exists in the bottomland hardwood habitat of the White and Cache River basins. Since the discovery, searchers have explored a variety of locations in other states to find the Ivory-bill. They include Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.
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Posted
11/28/11

2011 Ferret Release: Connecting Youth to Conservation (2:00)

Partners: In Canada: Government of Canada, Parks Canada, Environment Canada, Prairie Learning Centre, City of Swift Creek, the Chinook School Division, Toronto Zoo, Calgary Zoo, the Black-footed Ferret Recovery Implementation Team, the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation (PFRA) – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatchewan Environment, private stakeholders, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the World Wildlife Fund's U.S. Northern Great Plains Program

Ferret

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Mustela nigripes

Description: After the ferrets are released into Grasslands National Park and prairie dog towns, the ferrets are expected to disperse within their habitat. The population will require intense monitoring until the effects of ferrets on their ecosystem, and their survival rates can be understood. Monitoring will also be conducted to ensure that other species at risk populations are not adversely affected. Recovery of species at risk is a long-term commitment and will require multiple releases and monitoring efforts to ensure the greatest chance of success.
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Posted
11/17/11

Clakamas River Bull Trout Monitoring and Evaluation (4:37)

Partners: Oregon Depaartment of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and others

Clackamas River

Status: Threatened/ Listed on June 10, 1998
Scientific Name: Salvelinus confluentus

Description: In the past, bull trout were abundant and widely distributed in the Willamette Basin, including the Clackamas River. They were a historical component of the river's native fish assemblage that evolved over thousands of years. Currently, bull trout are extirpated from the Clackamas River Subbasin; there have been no documented sightings of bull trout in the Clackamas River since 1963. The bull trout was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1998. Efforts to recover the species are underway, including restoring the species to areas from which it has been lost.
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Posted
11/16/11

Kirtland's Warbler Tour (3:00)

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Region 3, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Kirtland's Warbler

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Dendroica kirtlandii

Description: The Kirtland's warbler, an endangered species, is a songbird that nests in young jack pine stands. Until 1995 Kirtland's warblers had only been known to nest in the northern part of Michigan's Lower Peninsula. Today, they also nest in the Upper Peninsula, and since 2007, have nested in Wisconsin and Canada. They migrate from their nesting grounds to the southeastern coast of the United States on their way to wintering grounds in the Bahamas. The male Kirtland's warblers' summer plumage is composed of a distinctive bright yellow colored breast streaked in black and bluish gray back feathers, a dark mask over its face with white eye rings, and bobbing tail. The female's plumage coloration is less bright; her facial area is devoid of a mask. Overall length of the bird is less than six inches.
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Posted
11/03/11

Partnering to Conserve Virginia's Coast (4:06)

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Region 5, Bavon Beach Homeowners Association, Mathews County, The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and several interested corporate partners

Tree Cactus

Status: Threatened/ Listed on August 7, 1990
Scientific Name: Cicindela dorsalis dorsalis

Description: A peaceful beach on the serene coast of Virginia holds a rich history as home to generations of families and abundant wildlife. But as Mother Nature changes the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, the homeowners on this beach have struggled to protect their narrowing strips of sand. Here at Bavon Beach, the northeastern beach tiger beetle, a federally threatened insect, has become the root to the solution to save this shore.
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Posted
10/27/11

Santa Clara Pueblo Rio Grande Cutthroat Restoration (10:25)

Host: Sarah Leon with Chris Kitcheyan, Josheph Chavarria, and Gilbert Gutierrez

Rio Grande Cuthroat trout

For over a decade Santa Clara Pueblo has worked to restore the Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki virginalis) to the headwaters of Santa Clara Creek in northern New Mexico. While the pueblo has faced a number of obstacles over the years that have threatened to scuttle this work, it has continued to move forward with efforts to conserve this rare fish so that it can endure into the future.
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Posted
10/27/11

Saving the Tree Cactus (2:52)

Partners: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Florida Department of Environmental Protection and private landowners

Tree Cactus

Status: Endangered/ Listed on July 17, 1984
Scientific Name: Pilosocereus robinii

Description: Plosocereus robinii is a large, tree-like cactus known in the U.S. only from the Florida Keys. The Key tree-cactus produces large white flowers and a purplish-red fruit. It is a member of the rare and declining tropical hammock communities on Upper and Lower Matecumbe, and Long and Big Pine keys. Populations formerly found on Key West and Windley and Boca Chica keys are believed to be extirpated. As early as 1917, this cactus was on the edge of being extinct as a result of habitat destruction. The Key tree-cactus Grants as listed as endangered because of severe population declines caused by destruction of its habitat for commercial and residential development.
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Posted
10/21/11

Arizona Ocelot (8:38)

Partner: Arizona Game and Fish Department, Beatty's Guest Ranch

Ocelot

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 28, 1972
Scientific Name: Lepardus pardalis

Description: In February 2011 an ocelot was photographed in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona. It was only the 3rd confirmed ocelot sighting in Arizona in the last 50 years. Over the last century, the U.S. population of the ocelot has been dramatically reduced. Restoring and protecting existing habitat is crucial because as an ocelot begins to mature it must leave its parents and go out in search of its own territory.
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Posted
10/18/11

Going Batty (2:34)

Partner: Indiana State University

Indiana Bat

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Myotis sodalis

Description: The Indiana bat spends summer months living throughout the eastern United States. During winter, they cluster together and hibernate in only a few caves. Over the last 25 years, the population of Indiana bats has declined by about 50 percent.
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Posted
10/13/11

Cumberland Sandwort - Cincinnati Zoo (1:37)

Partners: Cincinnati Zoo and U.S. Forest Service

Sandwort

Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 23, 1988
Scientific Name: Arenaria cumberlandensis

Description: Cumberland sandwort is only known from a limited portion of the Cumberland Plateau in north-central Tennessee and adjacent Kentucky. It is restricted to shady, moist rockhouse floors, overhanging ledges, and solution pockets in sandstone rock faces. This species occurs where the correct combination of shade, high moisture, cool temperatures, and high humidity provides appropriate habitat conditions.
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Posted
10/12/11

Bastrop Fire Creates Uncertainty for Houston Toad (05:32)

Host: Sarah Leon with Paige Najvar

Houston toad

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 13, 1970
Scientific Name: Bufo houstonensis

Description: The Bastrop Fire dealt a horrible blow to the federally endangered Houston toad this summer, when it swept through eastern Texas and destroyed a significant portion of the toads last remaining habitat. Learn what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Houston Zoo, and Texas Parks and Wildlife are doing to prevent the extinction of this rare amphibian.
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Posted
10/12/11

Borah High and Sage Grouse (5:07)

Partners: State of Idaho, Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission, Bureau of Land Management and private landowners

Grouse

Status: Candidate/ Conservation to preclude ESA listing
Scientific Name: Centrocercus urophasianus

Description: Greater sage-grouse are the largest grouse in North America. Males often weigh in excess of 4-5 pounds and hens weigh in at 2-3 pounds. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that proposing the species for protection is precluded by the need to take action on other species facing more immediate and severe extinction threats.
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Posted
10/06/11

Devils Hole Pupfish (3:15)

Partners: National Park Service, State of Nevada

Pupfish

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Cyprinodon diabolis

Description: This iridescent blue inch-long fish's only natural habitat is in the 93 degree waters of Devils Hole, located within the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada.
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Posted
09/29/11

Restoring Habitiat, Recovering the Nene (1:43)

Partners: The Hakalau Forest NWR and Refuge Friends Group, State of Hawaii

Hawaiian goose

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Branta sandvincencis

Description: The Nene, also known as the Hawaiian goose, is found only in the Hawaiian islands. They are one of the eight endangered native bird species benefiting from habitat restoration efforts being undertaken by the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge.

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Posted
09/29/11

Using Satellites to Save the North Atlantic Right Whale (2:24)

Partner: University of Maine

Right Whale

Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Eubalaena glacialis

Description: The North Atlantic right whale was once widely distributed in the Atlantic, but the population was dramatically reduced as a result of whaling. Despite complete protection of this species since 1935, well before the protections afforded by the Endangered Species Act of 1973, the species has not yet recovered.
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Posted
09/26/11

Thick-Billed Parrot (3:05)

Partner: Zoo America

parrot

Status: Endangered/ June 2, 1970
Scientific Name: Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha

Description: Once common in parts of Arizona, the remaining thick-billed parrot populations are found only in Mexico. The species is now the focus of a zoo-based Species Survival Plan.
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Posted
09/21/11

Black-Footed Ferret vs. Prairie Dog

Partners: Federal, State, Tribal and local governments, Prairie Wildlife Research and Clemson University.

Black-Footed Ferret

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Mustella nigripes

Description: Award winning footage with Travis Livieri from Prairie Wildlife Research and Patrick McMillan from Clemson University. Expeditions brings you the first ever broadcast footage of a Black-footed ferret interacting with a prairie dog in daylight.
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Posted
09/20/11

Public Gets Rare Look at Endangered Plants

Partners: Federal, State, and local governments, U.S. Botanic Garden, Center for Plant Conservation and National Tropical Botanical Garden

Endangered Plant

Status: Endangered/ Listed on February 25, 1994
Scientific Name: Brighamia insignis

Description: Brighamia insignis is an endangered plant that is endemic to sea cliffs on the NaPali Coast and Ha'upu Ridge on the island of Kauai. Overgrazing, human development, and competition from invasive weeds have reduced this species to only twenty individuals in four naturally occurring populations. The extinction of its pollinator, a sphingid moth, has made it all but impossible for Brighamia insignis to reproduce. Plant conservationists go to great lengths–rappelling over steep cliff edges–to exchange pollen among plants and to collect seeds that can be grown and stored in botanical gardens and seed banks.
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Posted
09/16/11

Searching for Purple Bean Mussels and Alabama Lampmussels (2:26)

Partners: Nature Conservancy and Tennessee Natural Resource Agency

Mussels

Status (purple bean): Endangered/ Listed on January 10, 1997
Scientific Name: Villosa perpurpurea

Description: The purple bean mussel has declined throughout its range as a result of the habitat altering effects of reservoir construction, coal mining, poor land-use practices, and non-point pollution. These are still the primary threats to its survival. The populations that remain are very vulnerable to stochastic, or random, events such as chemical spills.
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Status (Alabama lampmussel): Endangered/ Listed on June 16, 1967
Scientific Name: Lampsilis virescens

Description: Until the recent discovery of one individual in the Emory River, the Alabama lampmussel – an extremely rare freshwater mussel species – was thought to have been extirpated from Tennessee.
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Posted
09/14/11

Conserving the Missouri River Dinosaur and an Eyeless Ghost Fish (06:45)

Host: Sarah Leon with David Hendrix, Neosho National Fish Hatchery

Neosho NFH

Neosho National Fish Hatchery is the oldest operating federal fish hatchery in the U.S. Over 130 species of cold, cool, and warm water fish have been produced at the hatchery since it was established in 1888. Today, pallid sturgeon recovery is a major focus for hatchery staff, who also work to protect the endangered Ozark cavefish in one of the springs that supplies the hatcher with water.
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Posted
09/13/11

Helping the Endangered Interior Least Tern (2:00)

Partner: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Least Tern

Status: Endangered/ Listed on May 28, 1985
Scientific Name: Sterna antillarum

Description: Dams, reservoirs, and other changes to river systems have eliminated most historic least tern habitat. The wide channels dotted with sandbars that are preferred by the terns have been replaced by narrow forested river corridors.
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Posted
09/09/11

Efforts to Save the Endangered Baker's Larkspur (3:31)

Partner: University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley

UC Berkeley

Status: Endangered/ Listed on January 26, 2000
Scientific Name: Delphinium bakeri

Description: Part of the mission of the Botanical Garden at UC Berkeley is to collaborate with state and federal agencies to preserve endangered plant species. Curator Holly Forbes describes how they do this, and visits an area in West Marin County where they have been helping preserve the federally endangered Baker's larkspur.
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Posted
09/06/11

Salt Creek Tiger Beetles (6:35)

Partners: Federal, State, and local governments, non-governmental organizations and private landowners

Salt Creek Tiger Beetle

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 06, 2005
Scientific Name: Cicindela nevadica lincolniana

Description: The Salt Creek tiger beetle is a critically endangered subspecies of tiger beetle endemic to the saline wetlands of northern Lancaster County, Nebraska, adjacent to and immediately to the north of the city of Lincoln. It is a predatory insect, using its mandibles to catch other insects. The beetle is one of the rarest insects in North America.
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Posted
08/31/11

Desert Tortoise (3:44)

Partners: Federal, State, and local governments, non-governmental organizations and private landowners

Desert Tortoise.  Photo credit:  Kimberleigh J. Field, USFWS

Status: Threatened/ Listed on August 20, 1980
Scientific Name: Gopherus agassizii

Description: The desert tortoise is found throughout the Mojave Desert of California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, and Mexico. Desert tortoises have survived in the desert for millions of years, however today they face many hurdles.
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Posted
08/25/11

Plants Back from the Brink (4:21)

Partner: International Conservation - Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, England

Kew Garden

Description: The Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew is responsible for the world's largest collection of living plants. The organisation employs more than 650 scientists and other staff. The living collections include more than 30,000 different kinds of plants, while the herbarium, which is one of the largest in the world, has over seven million preserved plant specimens. The library contains more than 750,000 volumes, and the illustrations collection contains more than 175,000 prints and drawings of plants.
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Posted
08/18/11

Restoring the Northern Riffleshell (2:09)

Partner: Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission

Northern riffleshell mussel

Status: Endangered/ Listed on January 22, 1993
Scientific Name: Epioblasma torulosa rangiana

Description: Endangered throughout its range, the surviving Pennsylvania populations are some of the best remaining in the world. Water pollution, dam construction and dredging are the major causes for its decline, but other threats include stream sedimentation, channelization and reduced host fish populations. The Epioblasma mussles are some of the most environmentally sensitive species in North America.
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Posted
08/10/11

Pallid Sturgeon (08:14)

Host: Sarah Leon with Rob Holm, Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery

Garrison Dam NFH

Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery was originally established in 1957 to provide fish for recreational fishing. With many native fish species now struggling with changes in Missouri aquatic ecosystems, the hatchery's role has since changed to include maintaining migratory fishes, such as the paddlefish, and restoring endangered species, such as the pallid sturgeon.
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Posted
08/04/11

Mussels Abroad: An Exchange from America to China (3:39)

Partners: Freshwater Research Center in China, Virginia Tech, Virginia Department of Inland Game and Fisheries, Nature Conservancy, and others

Mussel

Description: Hear Jess Jones, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, talk about his upcoming trip to the Freshwater Fisheries Research Center in Wuxi, China–a world leader in producing cultured pearls with freshwater mussels.
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Posted
08/01/11

Longleaf Pine Forest (4:37)

Partner: Nature Conservancy

Longleaf Pine

Description: Longleaf pine forests once dominated the United States southern landscape from southeast Virginia to eastern Texas. But after decades of logging and fire suppression, restoring these towering conifers, and the rare species they sustain, could prove to be a tall order. The Nature Conservancy is working across the Southeast to conserve remaining longleaf-pine forests and restore degraded ones.
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Posted
07/20/11

Students Help New England Rabbits (3:41)

Partner: Chariho High School in Rhode Island, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/ Region 5

New England cottontail

Status: Candidate/ Conservation to preclude ESA listing
Scientific Name: Sylvilagus transitionalis

Description: Some find it hard to believe that a rabbitemblematic for prolific breeding could be at risk. But New England's only native rabbit, the New England cottontail, faces threats that have reduced its range by 86 percent since the mid-20th century.
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Posted
07/12/11

Preserving Endangered Species in the Everglades (1:22)

Partners: United States Army Corps of Engineers and State of Florida

Snail Kite

Description: The Florida Everglades is one of the nation's most unique ecosystems—and its inhabitants are very dependent on each other as well as the environment.
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Posted
06/29/11

Mussels of the Ozarks (7:04)

Partners: Southwest Missouri State University, Missouri Department of Conservtion, Mr. James Koepke (Private Landowner) and others.

Mussel

Description: General overview of freshwater mussel conservation in Missouri. Details the unique reproductive strategies of mussels and innovative land management practices that not only help recover endangered mussel species, but freshwater aquatic ecosystems overall.
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Posted
06/23/11

Surveying for the American Burying Beetle (1:17)

Partner: Saint Louis Zoo

American burying beetle

Status: Endangered/ Listed July 13, 1989
Scientific Name: Nicrophorus americanus

Description: About an inch and a half long, the American burying beetle can be identified by its striking, distinctive coloring. The body is shiny black, and on its wing covers are four scalloped, orange-red markings. Most distinctively, there is an orange-red marking on the beetle's pronotum, a large shield-like area just behind the head. The American burying beetle has orange facial markings and orange tips on the antennae. The beetles are strong fliers, moving as far as a kilometer in one night.
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Posted
06/20/11

Inside the National Zoo's Hormone Lab (Giant Panda Pregnancy Watch) (4:18)

Partner: Smithsonian Institution/National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute

Giant Panda

Status: Endangered/ Listed on January 23, 1984
Scientific Name: Ailuropoda melanoleuca

Description: Giant pandas are among the rarest mammals in the world. It is estimated that only 1,000 remain in the wild.
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Posted
06/15/11

Working for Plovers (12:45)

Partners: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service and others.

Western Plover

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 5, 1993
Scientific Name: Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus

Description: The western snowy plover is a small shorebird distinguished from other plovers (family Charadriidae) by its small size, pale brown upper parts, dark patches on either side of the upper breast, and dark gray to blackish legs. Snowy plovers weigh between 1.2 and 2 ounces. They are about 5.9 to 6.6 inches long. Historic records indicate that western snowy plovers nested in at least 29 locations on the Oregon coast. Currently, only eight locations in Oregon support nesting western snowy plovers, a 72 percent reduction in active breeding locations.
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Posted
06/08/11

Endangered Tigers Confirmed in Eastern Thailand (02:11)

Partner: Thai Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation

Tiger

Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 02, 1970
Scientific Name: Panthera tigris

Description: Tigers are territorial and generally solitary animals requiring large areas of habitat that support their prey needs. Their range includes some of the more densely populated places on earth, and this has caused significant conflicts with humans. Three of the nine subspecies of modern tiger have gone extinct, and the remaining six are classified as endangered, some critically so. The primary direct causes of imperilment are habitat destruction and poaching.
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Posted
06/07/11

Restoring the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem (06:33)

Host: Sarah Leon with Eric Palola and EJ Williams

Old-growth Longleaf pine. Credit: Bill Garland, USFWS

The longleaf pine forest once stretched across more than 90 million acres from southern Virginia to Florida, and as far west as Texas. Today only pockets of the vast forest are left, totaling less than four percent of its historic range. A number of federally listed species call this threatened ecosystem home, including the red-cockaded woodpecker, the bog turtle, and the eastern indigo snake.

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Posted
06/06/11

Big-River Fish Recovery (06:22)

Host: Sarah Leon with Angela Kantola

Colorado River

The Upper Colorado River Basin is home to 14 native fish species, including the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha), bonytail (Gila elegans), Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). These federally endangered fish are found only in the Colorado River system. The Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program is a multi-agency partnership to recover these four big-river fish while water use and development continues to meet human needs in compliance with interstate compacts and applicable federal and state laws.
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Posted
05/31/11

Canada Lynx Study (07:02)

Partner: Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Canada Lynx

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 24, 2000
Scientific Name: Lynx canadensis

Description: The lynx is a medium-sized cat with long legs, large, well-furred paws, long tufts on the ears, and a short, black-tipped tail. Nocturnal, solitary, and stealhthy, these cats are rarely seen by humans. Canada lynx eat mice, squirrels, and birds, but prefer the snowshoe hare as their primary prey species. The eyesight of the Canada lynx is so strong that an individual is able to spot a mouse as far as 250 feet (75 meters) away.
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Posted
05/25/11

Gopher Tortoise (02:05)

Partner: United States Army, Fort Gordon, Georgia

Gopher Tortoise

Status: Threatened/ Listed on July 7, 1987
Scientific Name: Gopherus polyphemus

Description: The gopher tortoise is a keystone species within its environment with over 100 species of animals found living in their burrows. Species that share tortoise burrows include protected species such as the Eastern indigo snake and Florida scrub-jay. Other, more common species include raccoons, burrowing owls, armadillos, and skunks. Gopher tortoise burrows benefit these animals in the same way that they benefit the gopher tortoise. They offer an environment of relatively constant temperature and humidity, protection from predators, and safety during fires.
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Posted
05/20/11

Whooping Crane (04:35)

Host: Sarah Leon with Dan Alonso, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

Whooping Crane, Aransas NWR

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 03, 1967
Scientific Name: Grus americana

Description: Even though a record-breaking 281 whooping cranes wintered this past season at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge on the Gulf Coast of Texas, climate change is a major concern for the charismatic endangered species.
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Posted
05/19/11

Red-Cockaded Woodpecker (08:50)

Partner: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Red Cockaded Woodpecker

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 13, 1970
Scientific Name: Picoides borealis

Description: The red-cockaded woodpecker plays a vital role in the intricate web of life of the southern pine forests. Red-cockaded woodpeckers are 'primary' cavity nesters, meaning they are responsible for the construction of cavities. In the southern pine ecosystem there are many 'secondary' cavity users that benefit from the RCWs work. RCWs are considered a "keystone" species because use of their cavities by these animals contributes to the species richness of the pine forest.
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Posted
05/17/11

Ozark Hellbender (00:32)

Partner: Missouri Department of Conservation

Hellbender

Status: Proposed Endangered
Scientific Name: Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi

Description: The Ozark hellbender is a strictly aquatic amphibian found in Ozark streams of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas. This subspecies of hellbender has been proposed as endangered because a rapid decline in numbers and range have left only small, isolated populations.

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Posted
05/13/11

Oregon Spotted Frog Release (01:31)

Partners: Oregon Zoo, Northwest Trek, Woodland Park Zoo, Clear Creek Correctional Facility and Fort Lewis (Army)

Oregon Spotted Frog

Status: Candidate/ Conservation to preclude ESA listing
Scientific Name: Rana pretiosa

Description: The Oregon spotted frog has been lost from at least 78 percent of its former range. Precise historic data is lacking, but this species has been documented in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California. It is believed to have been extirpated (locally extinct but exists elsewhere) from California. It is currently known to occur from extreme southwestern British Columbia, south through the eastern side of the Puget/Willamette Valley Trough and the Columbia River Gorge in south-central Washington, to the Cascades Range, to at least the Klamath Valley in Oregon.
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Posted
05/10/11

The Conservation of Swamp Pink in New Jersey (06:00)

Partner: Camden County College

Swamp Pink

Status: Threatened/ Listed on September 9, 1988
Scientific Name: Hellonius bullata

Description: A perennial member of the lily family, swamp pink has smooth, oblong, dark green leaves that form an evergreen rosette. In spring, some rosettes produce a flowering stalk that can grow over 3 feet tall. The stalk is topped by a 1 to 3-inch-long cluster of 30 to 50 small, fragrant, pink flowers dotted with pale blue anthers. The evergreen leaves of swamp pink can be seen year round, and flowering occurs between March and May.
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Posted
05/02/11

Ocelot Survival (07:43)

Partner: Texas Parks and Wildlife

Ocelot

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 28, 1972
Scientific Name: Lepardus pardalis

Description: The ocelot once ranged throughout Texas, and could even be found in Arizona, Louisiana, and Arkansas. However, over the last century, the U.S. population has been dramatically reduced. Restoring and protecting existing habitat is crucial because as an ocelot begins to mature it must leave its parents and go out in search of its own territory.
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Posted
04/20/11

Hawaiian Bird Conservation (02:63)

Partner: San Diego Zoo

Hawaii bird

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Loxioides bailleui

Description: Update by the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research on their efforts to recover the endangered palila.
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Posted
04/18/11

N.C. Zoo and the Red Wolf Reintroduction Program (01:59)

Partner: North Carolina Zoo

Red Wolf

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Canus rufus
Description: This video presents an overview of the North Carolina Zoo's work in support of the red wolf recovery program in Northeastern North Carolina.
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Posted
04/11/11

Massasauga Rattlesnake Research (05:39)

Partner: Missouri Department of Conservation

Massasauga Rattlesnake

Status: Candidate/ Conservation to preclude ESA listing
Scientific Name: Sistrurus catenatus catenatus
Description: The Eastern Massasauga is a small venomous rattlesnake found in the northeastern United States. Populations of this snake have declined to the point where it is now necessary to work to conserve it to prevent further declines and potential extinction in the future. Adults of this species are about two feet in length.
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Posted
04/05/11

Getting Across: Aquatic Organisms and Road-Stream Crossings (05:29)

Partners: U.S. Forest Service and Federal Highway Administration

Culvert

Description: Many culverts act as dams, or have water depths and flow velocities that otherwise block the passage of fish and other aquatic organisms. Not only does the health and diversity of the watershed depend on free passage upstream and downstream, but the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act both mandate free passage for aquatic species. This video explains why and how fixing culverts at road-stream crossings will restore habitats.
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Posted
04/04/11

Critical Habitat for Bull Trout: Road to Recovery (03:47)

Partner: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Bull Trout

Status: Threatened/ Listed on June 10, 1998
Scientific Name: Salvelinus confluentus
Description: Bull trout are members of the family Salmonidae and are char native Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Montana and western Canada. Compared to other salmonids, bull trout have more specific habitat requirements that appear to influence their distribution and abundance. They need cold water to survive, so they are seldom found in waters where temperatures exceed 59 to 64 degrees (F). Learn about bull trout conservation and habitat needs and see amazing underwater footage.
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Posted
03/29/11

Eastern Indigo Snake (03:00)

Partner: Zoo America

Eastern Indigo Snake

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 3, 1978
Scientific Name: Drymarchon corais couperi
Description: The eastern indigo snake is the largest nonvenomous snake found in the United States. The species was listed as threatened as a result of dramatic population declines caused by over-collecting for the domestic and international pet trade as well as mortalities caused by rattlesnake collectors who gassed gopher tortoise burrows to collect snakes.
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Posted
03/24/11

Mysterious Marbled Murrlett (05:31)

Partner: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Region 1

Marbled Murrlett

Status: Threatened/ Listed on October 1, 1992
Scientific Name: Brachyrhamphus marmoratus
Description: The marbled murrelet is a small Pacific seabird listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in California, Oregon and Washington. Rarely seen by humans, they spend the majority of their lives at sea. For years, ornithologists did not know where this mysterious bird nested. It wasn't until 1974 that the first marbled murrelet nest was discovered in North America.
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Posted
03/14/11

Endangered Mussels (06:01)

Partner: Kentucky Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Resources

Endangered Mussels

Description: A video about the efforts of the Kentucky Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Resources to recover the State's freshwater mussel species.

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Posted
03/14/11

Kirtland's Warbler (02:49)

Partner: Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin

Kirtlands Warbler

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Dendroica kirtlandii
Description: The Kirtland's warbler, an endangered species, is a songbird that nests in young jack pine stands. Until 1995 warblers had only been known to nest in the northern part of the Lower Peninsula. Today, they also nest in the Upper Peninsula, and since 2007, have nested in Wisconsin and Canada.
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Posted
03/14/11

Endangered Mussels Released into the Clinch River (02:37)

Partners: Virginia Department of Inland Game and Fisheries, Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Center at Virginia Tech

VDIGF

Description: A video about the largest release of endangered freshwater mussels in the eastern United States.
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Posted
03/14/11

Montana Grizzly Bear DNA Part II (01:35)

Partner: Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks

Grizzly Bear

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 11, 1975
Scientific Name: Ursus arctos horribilus
Description: Grizzly bears are generally larger and more heavily built than other bears. Grizzly bears can be distinguished from black bears, which also occur in the lower 48 States by longer curved claws, humped shoulders, and a face that appears to be concave. A wide range of coloration from light brown to nearly black is common. Spring shedding, new growth, nutrition, and coat conditions all affect coloration. Guard hairs are often pale in color at the tips; hence the name "grizzly." In the lower 48 States, the average weight of grizzly bears is generally 400 to 600 pounds for males and 250 to 350 pounds for females. Grizzly bears are long lived mammals and generally live to be around 25 years old.
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Posted
03/14/11

Montana Grizzly Bear DNA Part I (01:39)

Partner: Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks

Grizzly Bear

Status: Threatened/ Listed on March 11, 1975
Scientific Name: Ursus arctos horribilus
Description: Grizzly bears are generally larger and more heavily built than other bears. Grizzly bears can be distinguished from black bears, which also occur in the lower 48 States by longer curved claws, humped shoulders, and a face that appears to be concave. A wide range of coloration from light brown to nearly black is common. Spring shedding, new growth, nutrition, and coat conditions all affect coloration. Guard hairs are often pale in color at the tips; hence the name "grizzly." In the lower 48 States, the average weight of grizzly bears is generally 400 to 600 pounds for males and 250 to 350 pounds for females. Grizzly bears are long lived mammals and generally live to be around 25 years old.
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Posted
03/14/11

Stream Restoration to Save Coldwater Darters (02:39)

Partners: Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute, Georgia Department of Natural Resources and Conasaugua River Alliance

Tennessee Aquarium logo

Description: This video describes the importance of habitat conservation and restoration for aquatic species.

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Posted
03/14/11

Karner Blue Butterfly (04:31)

Partner: Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin

Karner Blue Butterfly

Status: Endangered/ Listed on December 19, 1992
Scientific Name: Lycaeides melissa samuelis
Description: The Karner blue butterfly was first described more than a century ago in Karner, New York. It is a small butterfly, with a wingspan of about one inch.
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Posted
03/14/11

Wyoming Toad (01:12)

Partners: University of Wyoming, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/ Region 6

Wyoming Toad

Status: Endangered/ Listed on January 17, 1984
Scientific Name: Bufo baxteri
Description: The Wyoming toad was a common sight on areas of the Laramie Plains, Albany County, Wyoming, into the early 1970s but the populations crashed in the middle 1970s.
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Posted
03/14/11

New England Cottontail (03:53)

Host: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Region 5

New England Cottontail

Status: Candidate/ Identified as a candidate species on September 12, 1996
Scientific Name: Sylvilagus transitionalis
Description: As recently as 1960, New England cottontails were found east of the Hudson River in New York, across all of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, north to southern Vermont and New Hampshire, and into southern Maine. Today, this rabbit's range has shrunk by more than 75 percent. Its numbers are so greatly diminished that it can no longer be found in Vermont.
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Posted
03/14/11

Pallid Sturgeon (01:34)

Host: Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks

Pallid Sturgeon

Status: Endangered/ Listed on September 6, 1990
Scientific Name: Scaphirhynchus albus
Description: The pallid sturgeon is one of the rarest and largest freshwater fish in North America.
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Posted
03/14/11

Mauna Loa Silversword (03:09)

Host: National Park Service

Mauna Loa Silversword

Status: Endangered/ Listed on April 7, 1973
Scientific Name: Argyroxiphium kauense
Description: One of a diverse group of plants have that have evolved from a single common ancestor which probably arrived on the Hawaiian Islands about 8 million years ago. The Mauna Loa Silversword is a giant rosette plant found only in the active volcano of Mauna Loa on the island of Hawaii.
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Posted
03/14/11

Okaloosa Darter (01:35)

Partners: Eglin Air Force Base, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Okaloosa Darter

Status: Endangered/ Listed on June 4, 1973
Scientific Name: Etheostoma okaloosae
Description: The Okaloosa darter makes its home in only six stream systems draining into two Choctawhatchee Bay bayous in Walton and Okaloosa counties in northwest Florida. Most of this watershed drainage area is under the management of Eglin Air Force Base, as is most of the darter's present range. Over 97 percent of the habitat occupied by the darter is located on the base.
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Posted
03/14/11

Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Safe Harbor Agreement (03:29)

Partners: Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Weyerhaeuser Corporation

Red-Cockaded Woodpecker

Status: Endangered/ Listed on October 13, 1970
Scientific Name: Picoides borealis
Description: On January 8, 2010, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) enrolled 58,763 acres of land owned and/or leased by Weyerhaeuser into the Louisiana Red-cockaded Woodpecker Safe Harbor Program.
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Posted
03/14/11

California Condors Soar Over Utah (03:00)

Partner: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

California Condor

Status: Endangered/ Listed on March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Gymnogyps californianus
Description: This video provides information about the biology of this species and great footage of these magnificent birds.
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Partnerships Archive - 2010

Last updated: July 15, 2013