Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Rattling Support for the Eastern Massasauga

Three years of research, more than $60,000 in funding, and a lifetime of habitat manipulation is the secret to resurrecting a degraded swamp into basking habitat for a slithering resident of the Empire State. Read More

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Restoring a Rare Fern in New York

New York is home to the largest population of American hart’s-tongue fern (Asplenium scolopendrium var. americanum) in the entire country. This rare plant was placed under the protection of the Endangered Species Act in … Read More

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Big Partnerships Help Even the Smallest Creatures

A unique union formed between a utility company, a land preserve and two government agencies has created an impressive opportunity for conservation in New York. National Grid, an electric ... Read More

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Protecting New York's Thumbnail-sized Snail

In central New York, in the mist where Chittenango Falls cascades over million-year-old bedrock, creep several hundred tiny, rare animals that evolved over 2 million years. Read More

Featured Species in New York

Bog turtle

Bog turtle

At only about 4 inches long, the bog turtle is North America's smallest turtle. The northern population of bog turtles in known to range from New York and western Massachusetts south to Maryland.

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Bog turtle

Photo credit: USFWS

Canada lynx, photo credit: Michael Zahra

Canada lynx

The Canada lynx is a medium-sized cat, similar to the bobcat. It has longer legs and very large well-furred paws, impressive adaptations for maneuvering through deep winter snow. While their name suggests otherwise, the historical and present North American range of the Canada lynx includes Alaska, Canada, and many of the other northern 48 states.  More »

 

Canada lynx

Photo credit: Michael Zahra

Great Lakes piping plover  , Photo credit: Jim Rorabaugh, USFWS

Great Lakes piping plover

The Great Lakes population of the piping plover was at a perilously low level. But intensive conservation efforts have seen the number of breeding pairs steadily climb from a low of 12 in 1983.

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Great Lakes piping plover

Photo credit: Gene Nieminen, USFWS

New England cottontail , Photo credit: : Pam Wells

New England cottontail

The New England cottontail population has plummeted over the last several decades, disappearing from 86 percent of its historical range.

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New England cottontail

Photo credit: : Pam Wells

Karner blue butterfly , Photo credit: Aimee Roberson, USFWS

Karner blue butterfly

The Karner blue is a small blue insects with a wingspan of about one inch. Habitat throughout the range of the Karner blue has been lost through human activity to suppress wildfire, cultivate forests and develop communities.

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Karner blue butterfly

Photo credit: Paul Labus, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana

Partnership Stories in New York

Chittenango ovate amber snail.  Photo credit: Kirstin Breisch Russell

Chittenango ovate amber snail

The Chittenango ovate amber snail, an endangered species, is found only at the Chittenango Falls in Cazenovia, New York. Scientists have been working together for the past decade to protect and monitor the little invertebrate's population. More »

Found in New York

  • Chittenango ovate amber snail, Photo credit: Kirstin Breisch Russell

    The Chittenango ovate amber snail (Succinea chittenangoensis) is only found in one place — Chittenango Falls State Park in Madison County, New York. The primary threats to the snail in its existing habitat are considered to be the small population size and limited distribution of the species and the negative interaction with an introduced snail, Succinea sp. B. for food and habitat.

    Photo credit: Kirstin Breisch Russell

  • Seabeach amaranth, Photo credit: Gene Nieminen, USFWS

    Seabeach amaranth (Amaranthus pumilus) is an annual plant found on the dunes of Atlantic Ocean beaches. It appears to need extensive areas of barrier island beaches and inlets, functioning in a relatively natural and dynamic manner. The most serious threats to the continued existence of Seabeach amaranth include the construction of beach stabilization structures, beach erosion and tidal inundation, beach grooming, herbivory by insects and feral animals and, in certain circumstances, by off-road vehicles.

    Photo credit: Gene Nieminen, USFWS

See other species listed in New York
Last updated: January 29, 2014