Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Stories from - NEW HAMPSHIRE

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Robbin's Cinquefoil: Setting the Precedent for Plant Recovery

It is able to withstand some of the harshest weather conditions in New England, yet despite this, the Robbins' cinquefoil flower needed the protection of the Endangered Species Act to survive. Read More

Stories from - NEW HAMPSHIRE

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Restoring New England Cottontail Habitat in New Hampshire

Many efforts are underway across southern New Hampshire to try and create habitats for a vulnerable population of New England cottontail rabbits... Read More

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Unraveling the Mystery of One of Our Rarest Orchids

Even if you're lucky enough to stroll past one of the nation's rarest native orchids, you might not take notice of it. The modest small whorled pogonia (Isotria medeoloides) grows from a few inches ... Read More

Stories from - NEW YORK

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Karner Blue Butterfly Breeding Program

Once a flourishing population in the Midwest across the Northeast and along the Atlantic seaboard, the Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) is now only found in ... Read More

Featured Species in New Hampshire

Jesup’s milk-vetch, photo credit: © Lisa Mattei, New England Wild Flower Society

Jesup’s milk-vetch

Jesup's milk-vetch, an extremely rare member of the bean family, occurs only at three sites along a 15-mile stretch of the Connecticut River in New Hampshire and Vermont.     More »

 

Jesup’s milk-vetch

Photo credit: © Lisa Mattei, New England Wild Flower Society

Canada lynx , photo credit: Michael Zahra

Canada lynx

While their name suggests otherwise, the historic range of Canada lynx extended across the border into northern parts of the contiguous United States from Washington to Maine and down into the Rocky Mountains. A variety of factors contributed to lynx reduced range, notably land use changes with human expansion and a warming climate as possible contributing factors.  More »

 

Canada lynx

Photo credit: Michael Zahra

Atlantic Coast piping plover  , Photo credit: USFWS

Atlantic Coast piping plover

The piping plover is a dainty, sand-colored shorebird, distinguished from other small North American plovers by its pale plumage and bright orange legs. Human activities can disturb piping plovers on both their breeding and wintering grounds.

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Atlantic Coast piping plover

Photo credit: USFWS

New England cottontail , Photo credit: : Pam Wells

New England cottontail

The New England cottontail population has plummeted over the last several decades, disappearing from 86 percent of its historical range.

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New England cottontail

Photo credit: : Pam Wells

Karner blue butterfly, photo credit: Paul Labus, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana

Karner blue butterfly

The Karner blue is a small blue insects with a wingspan of about one inch. Habitat throughout the range of the Karner blue has been lost through human activity to suppress wildfire, cultivate forests and develop communities.     More »

 

Karner blue butterfly

Photo credit: Paul Labus, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana

Partnership Stories in New Hampshire

What Doesn't Stay in Vegas? Sprawl.

New England Cottontail

As recently as 1960, New England cottontails were found east of the Hudson River in New York, across all of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, north to southern Vermont and New Hampshire, and into southern Maine. Today, this rabbit's range has shrunk by more than 75 percent. Its numbers are so greatly diminished that it can no longer be found in Vermont. More »

Found in New Hampshire

  • Northeastern bulrush , Photo credit: John Kunsman,  Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program

    Northeastern bulrush (Scirpus ancistrochaetus) is a type of sedge found in ponds, wet depressions, or small sinkholes within wetlands complexes in hilly areas. These wetlands are characterized by seasonably variable water levels. It is threatened by habitat loss and degradation caused by human activities including development and land use practices.

    Photo credit: John Kunsman, Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program

  • Piping plovers, Photo credit: Auburn Photography Club

    Piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) were common along the Atlantic coast during much of the 19th Century, but commercial hunting for feathers to decorate hats nearly wiped them out. Intensive protection has helped the population more than double in the last 20 years, but the most recent surveys place the Atlantic population at fewer than 2,000 pairs.

    Photo credit: Auburn Photography Clu

See other species listed in New Hampshire
Last updated: February 4, 2014