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Indiana’s Wyandotte Cave Shares a Long, Colorful History With the Indiana Bat

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, but some species have been recognized as endangered for almost 50 years. The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) was among the first 78 species to gain ... Read More

Stories from - INDIANA

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Indiana Bat Conservation Plan Takes Off at Indianapolis Airport

Building successful partnerships requires hard work and can take decades. In the case of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Indianapolis International Airport, it has taken 20 years, but the effort ...Read More

Featured Species in Indiana

Great Lakes piping plover , photo credit: Gene Nieminen, USFWS

Great Lakes piping plover

The Great Lakes population of the piping plover was at a perilously low level. But intensive conservation efforts have seen the number of breeding pairs steadily climb from a low of 12 in 1983.

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Great Lakes piping plover

Photo credit: Gene Nieminen, USFWS

Karner blue butterfly, Photo credit: Paul Labus, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana

Karner blue butterfly

The Karner blue is a small blue insects with a wingspan of about one inch. Habitat throughout the range of the Karner blue has been lost through human activity to suppress wildfire, cultivate forests and develop communities.

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Karner blue butterfly

Photo credit: Paul Labus, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana

Northern riffleshell, photo credit: USFWS

Northern riffleshell

Northern riffleshell, typical of many freshwater mussels, are sensitive to siltation, residential and commercial pollution, agricultural run-off, channelization, impoundments, and competition with zebra mussel. Rivers than can support a reproducing population of northern riffleshells probably has good water quality and a healthy watershed.     More »

 

Northern riffleshell

Photo credit: USFWS

Partnership Stories in Indiana

Going Batty, photo credit: USFWS

Going Batty

The Indiana bat spends summer months living throughout the eastern United States. During winter, they cluster together and hibernate in only a few caves. Over the last 25 years, the population of Indiana bats has declined by about 50 percent.   More »

Found in Indiana

  • Eastern prairie fringed orchids, Photo credit: Melanie Cota, USFWS

    Eastern prairie fringed orchids (Platanthera leucophaea) were once widespread across the upper Midwest, however extensive habitat modification and destruction has caused this plant – one of at least 200 North American orchid species – to severely decline. In Indiana, the species is known only to the wet prairies and bogs of White County.

    Photo credit: Melanie Cota, USFWS

  • Indiana bats, Photo credit: USFWS

    Indiana bats (Myotis sodalist) are found across much of the eastern half of the United States—nearly half of them hibernate in caves in southern Indiana. These animals benefit people by consuming insects that are considered pests or otherwise harmful to humans. Indiana bats eat up to half their body weight in insects each night.

    Photo credit: USFWS

See other species listed in Indiana
Last updated: November 12, 2013