director Blog : wyoming

The Recovery of the Wolf and What's Next

With more than 1,650 wolves, 244 packs, and 110 breeding pairs, the gray wolf population in the northern Rocky Mountains has biologically recovered. As a result, we've proposed to remove the gray wolf population in Wyoming from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife

The proposal to delist wolves in Wyoming hinges upon the State's commitment to a revised wolf management plan, which now contains sufficient protections and safeguards to ensure that wolves never again end up on the list.  

The road to recovery hasn't been easy. Many people have worked hard to make sure recovery goals have been met, and we've been happy to see those goals exceeded for eleven straight years.  

We understand that there may be an emotional reaction among some wolf advocates to the prospect of wolf hunting under state management. But an examination of this plan, in light of what we know to be true about the wolf population in the Northern Rocky Mountains, supports our conclusion that wolves are no longer threatened or endangered in Wyoming and that management should be returned to the state. 

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Where we Stand: State of Wyoming and Wolf Management

During the last couple of weeks, we've received a number of comments on this blog and through other venues regarding our negotiations with the State of Wyoming on a plan for managing wolves in that state. I wanted to write you today to let you know that we are listening. I also wanted to let you know where the Service currently stands on this important and emotional issue.

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Last updated: August 31, 2011