Working Together to Preserve and Protect

Monday and Tuesday I've was back in Hawaii, meeting with refuge and law enforcement staff, and visiting some truly inspirational places.

At Ka'ena Point, on the northwest corner of Oahu, I saw how we have worked with our state partners to build an exclusionary fence and remove dogs, cats, mongoose, rats, and mice from this sensitive area. The response has been rapid. Laysan albatross are nesting, and the Secretary of Hawaii's Department of Land and Natural Resources (William Aila) boasted that, "One day this area will look like Midway Atoll, with thousands of nesting albatross."
William Aila Talks about the land at Ka'ena Point Credit: USFWS

A Visit to Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge With My Dad

I'm currently visiting our National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia, but I wanted to catch you up on a busy last week.

After attending Thursday's board meeting with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in DC--who, by the way, are developing a really cool business model that emphasizes species-driven outcomes, very much like our Strategic Habitat Conservation framework--I was off to Massachusetts, home to our Northeast Regional Office and my Dad's home state.

I flew into Logan Airport in Boston Thursday night. After a Friday morning meeting with the Boston Globe, I delivered the keynote address to the annual meeting of the Nashua River Watershed Association. The Association is a great partner and very engaged in helping protect a watershed which encompasses our own Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge

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Trouble in the Bat Cave: An L.A. Times Op-Ed

Today, we feature Dan's Los Angeles Times op-ed on a deadly bat disease called white-nose syndrome. The disease is killing bats, seriously affecting the economy and the environment.

You can find more information on white-nose syndrome at http://www.fws.gov/whitenosesyndrome. You can get regular updates about white-nose syndrome on Facebook and on Twitter

October 12, 2011

By Dan Ashe

It's October, which means that bats are once again having their annual star turn, popping up on classroom bulletin boards and store windows across America. But this year, actual living bats in North America aren't so abundant. They are being decimated by a deadly health epidemic.

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Last updated: August 31, 2011