Facebook icon Twitter icon Flicker icon You Tube icon

Director's Corner

Meet Service Director Dan Ashe.

Gray Wolves are Recovered; Next Up, the Mexican Wolf

wolfWe are proposing to remove gray wolves from the list of threatened and endangered species throughout the United States and Mexico. Photo by Gary Kramer/USFWS

As many of you probably know, my dad had a great, 37-year career with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and he describes the outfit as a collection of people who get things done -- doers.  Nowhere is that trait more proudly displayed than in our four decade effort to restore the gray wolf to the American landscape, bringing the species back from extirpation and exile from the contiguous United States.

I'm the 16th Director of the Service. It was the 10th, John Turner, a Wyoming rancher and outfitter, appointed by a Republican President, who signed the record of decision that set in motion this miraculous reintroduction and recovery. It's never been easy. We've had critics, fair and unfair. We've had great partners. Sometimes they have been one in the same. But this organization and its people have been constant. Steadfast. Committed. Professional. Determined. Now add successful!

More information on the wolf recovery

This great predator again roams the range, ridges and remote spaces of the Northern Rocky Mountains and the Western Great Lakes in one of the spectacular successes of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  These recovered populations are not just being tolerated, but are expanding under professional management by our state partners.

Today, for one reason, and one reason only, we are proposing to remove the gray wolf from the list of threatened and endangered species throughout the United States and Mexico -- they are no longer in danger of extinction now or in the foreseeable future.

[More]


The Recovery of the Wolf and What's Next

With more than 1,650 wolves, 244 packs, and 110 breeding pairs, the gray wolf population in the northern Rocky Mountains has biologically recovered. As a result, we've proposed to remove the gray wolf population in Wyoming from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife

The proposal to delist wolves in Wyoming hinges upon the State's commitment to a revised wolf management plan, which now contains sufficient protections and safeguards to ensure that wolves never again end up on the list.  

The road to recovery hasn't been easy. Many people have worked hard to make sure recovery goals have been met, and we've been happy to see those goals exceeded for eleven straight years.  

We understand that there may be an emotional reaction among some wolf advocates to the prospect of wolf hunting under state management. But an examination of this plan, in light of what we know to be true about the wolf population in the Northern Rocky Mountains, supports our conclusion that wolves are no longer threatened or endangered in Wyoming and that management should be returned to the state. 

[More]