Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge
Pacific Region
 
Deer Flat NWR
13751 Upper Embankment Rd Nampa, ID 83686
Phone: 208-467-9278
Fax: 208-467-1019

Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge
Comprehensive Conservation Planning

Frequently Asked Questions

We are delighted that folks are interested in the Refuge’s CCP. During the planning process, the recreational activities that you enjoy now will continue. However, changes may be implemented following the completion and implementation of the approved CCP. The CCP is scheduled to be completed in Winter 2013-14. Please see the refuge brochure for more information on current management and recreation at Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge.

We will conduct the CCP planning process in an open, inclusive, and transparent manner. Comments received on the draft CCP are currently being considered. To provide more information about the CCP process, we offer you…

“The Most Frequently Asked Questions about the Refuge and the CCP”

1. How can I find out more about the draft CCP and what changes are proposed?

2. How can I provide my comments?

3. How can I stay informed about the CCP process

4. What have you heard in previous public comment periods?

5. What is the purpose of Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge?

6. What happens during the CCP planning and public involvement process?

7. What are the National Wildlife Refuge System’s policies regarding recreational uses?

 

1) How can I find out more about the draft CCP and what changes are proposed?

Review Planning Update 5 (or the translation en espanol) which summarizes the alternatives proposed in the draft CCP/EIS or read the entire draft. Both the Planning Update and the draft CCP/EIS can be downloaded here. The Draft comment period ended May 15, 2013.

View this video (file larger than 500 kb) providing an overview of the CCP process and the draft preferred alternative.

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2) How can I provide my comments?

The third and final comment period during this planning process, to submit comments on the Draft CCP/EIS, ended on May 15, 2013. We will use ideas from these comments to develop the final CCP/EIS. Responses to comments received on the draft CCP/EIS will be included in the final CCP/EIS, which is expected to be released in fall or winter of 2013.

The first round of Public Scoping, which provided the first opportunity for public comment in this process, ended September 10, 2010. We received over 800 comments during that period. The second round of scoping outreach, providing opportunities to comment on Preliminary Draft Alternatives, ended July 29, 2011. We received over 200 comments during that period. We used ideas from those comment periods, as well as best available science, to develop the draft CCPEIS. Appendix H of the draft CCP/EIS summarizes public input during the first and second rounds of public scoping in 2010 and 2011.

3) How can I stay informed about the CCP process.

Call (208-467-9278) or email to be added to the CCP mailing list and receive future Planning Updates to keep you informed about the planning process.

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4) What have you heard in previous public comment periods?

Appendix H of the draft CCP/EIS summarizes public input during the first round of public scoping in 2010 and the second round of public scoping (providing opportunities to comment on Preliminary Draft Alternatives) in 2011. We used ideas from those comments, as well as best available science, to develop the draft CCP/EIS. Responses to comments received during the 2013 comment period on the draft CCP/EIS will be included in the final CCP/EIS, which is expected to be released in fall or winter of 2013.

5) What is the purpose of Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge?

Deer Flat Refuge was established by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1909 and is one of the oldest refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Refuge currently manages more than 200 native bird species including geese, swans, pelicans, songbirds, ducks, shorebirds, eagles, falcons, hawks and owls; and over 30 mammals, including mule deer, coyote, red fox, gophers, marmot, badger, rabbits, and beaver. The Refuge encompasses two units—the Lake Lowell Unit and the Snake River Islands Unit—these units include riparian forest, shrub steppe, open water, freshwater marsh, and cropland habitats.

The designated purposes of Deer Flat NWR are:

  • Serve as a refuge and breeding grounds for migratory birds and other wildlife.
  • For use as an inviolate sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds.
  • Suitable for incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreational development, the protection of natural resources, and the conservation of endangered species or threatened species.

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6) What happens during the CCP planning and public involvement process?

The CCP planning and public involvement process is shown in the diagram below. We are currently at step 7. If you would like more in-depth information about the Comprehensive Conservation Planning process, see 602 FW3 . If you would like to review the Planning Update that provides information about this stage of the process, click here or contact us (208-467-9278) to request a copy. You can also contact us (208-467-9278) to be added to the mailing list to receive future planning updates that will keep you informed about the planning process.

Diagram showing steps in the Comprehensive Conservation Planning Process.

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7) What are the National Wildlife Refuge System’s policies regarding recreational uses?

Two of the primary policies guiding recreational uses on a refuge are appropriateness and compatibility.

Our Appropriate Refuge Uses Policy states: Recreational activities which are dependent on wildlife, known as the Big Six priority public uses—fishing, hunting, wildlife photography, wildlife observation, environmental education, and wildlife interpretation—are automatically considered to be appropriate activities on a national wildlife refuge, whereas other uses are not.

Generally, to be considered appropriate, uses other than the Big Six priority uses must, among other considerations, contribute to the public’s understanding and appreciation of the refuge’s natural or cultural resources or be beneficial to the refuge’s natural or cultural resources. They also must not impair existing wildlife-dependent recreational uses or reduce the potential to provide quality, compatible, wildlife-dependent recreation into the future.

According to our Compatibility Policy, once a recreational activity is determined to be appropriate, it must be evaluated for compatibility. To be compatible, a recreational use must not materially interfere with or detract from the purpose of the Refuge or the National Wildlife Refuge System mission.

The general policy on Wildlife-Dependent Recreation also provides general guidance on Refuge recreation programs.

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Last updated: May 16, 2013