Back

Document Title:

Homeowner's Guide to Protecting Frogs - : Lawn and Garden Care

AUTHOR(S):


PAGES:
1 - 2

PUBLICATION DATE: July 2000

ABSTRACT:
Homeowners use up to 10 times more chemical pesticides per acre on their lawns than farmers use on crops, and they spend more per acre, on average, to maintain their lawns than farmers spend per agricultural acre. During a rain, the pesticides and fertilizers you put on your lawn can be carried by runoff and end up contaminating a stream or wetland dozens of miles away. Contaminants can also be carried for long distances through the air and deposited on land and in water by rain or fog. Such examples of pollution are called “non-point source” pollution. You may not think that you can make a difference, but caring for your lawn in an environmentally sensible way can have a bigger impact than you might think. Your lawn is only a small piece of land, but all the lawns across the country cover a lot of ground. That means your lawn care activities, along with everyone else’s, can make a difference to the environment. If you use pesticides and other chemicals to maintain your lawn and garden, you can help reduce the amount of pollution reaching our nation’s waters and harming frogs, as well as other fish and wildlife, by changing the way you care for your yard.

PUBLISHED BY:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

DOCUMENT LINK:
http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/Documents/Homeowners_Guide_Frogs.pdf, 338 KB

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Environmental Contaminants Program, Amphibian Declines and Deformities

Last updated: February 13, 2013