Pacific Southwest Region
California, Nevada and Klamath Basin

Completed Five-Year Reviews of Federally Listed Species

Go to the list of recent species reviewed in the Pacific Southwest Region

October 20, 2009

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 50 species in California, Nevada, and southern Oregon. The Service has recommended uplisting the Bay checkerspot butterfly from threatened to endangered.  The Service has recommended downlisting the arroyo toad, Modoc sucker, and Santa Cruz cypress from endangered to threatened.

The Service has recommended no change in status for the 46 other species reviewed: Ash Meadows milk-vetch, Callippe silverspot butterfly, Clara Hunt’s milk-vetch, Cushenbury buckwheat, Cushenbury milk-vetch, Cushenbury oxytheca, desert slender salamander, hairy Orcutt grass, Hoffmann’s slender-flowered gilia, Kenwood Marsh checkermallow, Lake County stonecrop, light-footed clapper rail, Loch Lomond coyote thistle, marcescent dudleya, Mexican flannelbush, Mount Hermon June beetle, Munz’s onion, Nevin’s barberry, Otay tarplant, palmate-bracted bird’s-beak, Parish’s daisy, Pismo clarkia, Pitkin Marsh lily, Quino checkerspot butterfly, Railroad Valley springfish, salt marsh bird’s-beak, San Benito evening-primrose, San Bernadino Mountains bladderpod, San Bernardino Merriam’s kangaroo rat, San Clemente sage sparrow, San Clemente loggerhead shrike, San Diego thornmint, Santa Cruz Island dudleya, Santa Cruz Island fringepod, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander, Shasta crayfish, spreading navarretia, spring-loving centaury, Springville clarkia, thread-leaved brodiaea, triple-ribbed milk-vetch, unarmored threespine stickleback, Verity’s dudleya, white sedge, Yadon’s piperia, Zayante band-winged grasshopper.

Lead management responsibilities for species contained in this review area assigned to Fish and Wildlife Offices (FWO) within the Pacific Southwest Region. Information about species reviewed can be found on the following designated Fish and Wildlife Office websites:

Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office Cushenbury buckwheat, Cushenbury milk-vetch, Cushenbury oxytheca, desert slender salamander, light-footed clapper rail, Mexican flannelbush, Munz’s onion, Nevin’s barberry, Otay tarplant, Parish’s daisy, Quino checkerspot butterfly, salt marsh bird’s-beak, San Bernadino Mountains bladderpod, San Bernardino Merriam’s kangaroo rat, San Clemente sage sparrow, San Clemente loggerhead shrike, San Diego thornmint, spreading navarretia, thread-leaved brodiaea, triple-ribbed milk-vetch.

Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office Bay checkerspot butterfly, Callippe silverspot butterfly, Clara Hunt’s milk-vetch, hairy Orcutt grass, Kenwood Marsh checkermallow, Lake County stonecrop, Loch Lomond coyote thistle, palmate-bracted bird’s-beak, Pitkin Marsh lily, Shasta crayfish, Springville clarkia, white sedge

Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office Arroyo toad, Hoffmann’s slender-flowered gilia, marcescent dudleya, Mount Hermon June beetle, Pismo clarkia, San Benito evening-primrose, Santa Cruz cypress, Santa Cruz Island dudleya, Santa Cruz Island fringepod, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander, unarmored threespine stickleback, Verity’s dudleya, Yadon’s piperia, Zayante band-winged grasshopper.

Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office Ash Meadows milk-vetch, Railroad Valley springfish, spring-loving centaury.

Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office Modoc sucker.

View/download copies of the 5 year reviews

May 15, 2009

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of a 5-year review for Western Lily (Lilium occidentale), an endangered plant found in northern California and southern Oregon. We are not recommending a change in status for this species.

This 5-year review was undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act), and was noticed for review on March 5, 2008. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status would require a separate rulemaking process. More information about Western Lily is found online at http://www.fws.gov/arcata .

April 8, 2009

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 22 species in California, Nevada, and southern Oregon. Of the reviews being announced today, the Service has recommended delisting the Indian Knob mountainbalm, a small tree of the California Central Coast. The Service has recommended no change in status for the 21 other species reviewed.

These 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act). This list of completed reviews incorporates species that were noticed for review on March 22, 2006; February 14, 2007; and March 5, 2008. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status will require a separate rulemaking process.

More information about the species included in this announcement is found online:
Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office: Point Arena mountain beaver.
Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office: Applegate’s milk-vetch.
Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office: Lahontan cutthroat trout and Steamboat buckwheat.
Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office: Delta green ground beetle, Hoover’s spurge, large-flowered fiddleneck, many-flowered navarretia, Myrtle’s silverspot butterfly, soft bird’s-beak, Solano grass, Suisun thistle.
Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office: Amargosa vole, Braunton’s milk-vetch, coastal dunes milk-vetch, conejo dudleya, Fish Slough milk-vetch, Hickman’s potentilla, Indian Knob mountain-balm, Mohave tui chub, Monterey spineflower, Owens pupfish.

Recommended for downlisting is the Indian Knob mountain-balm (Eriodictyon altissimum).

No status change is recommended for Amargosa vole, Applegate’s milk-vetch, Braunton’s milk-vetch, coastal dunes milk-vetch, conejo dudleya, delta green ground beetle, Fish Slough milk-vetch, Hickman’s potentilla, Hoover’s spurge, Lahontan cutthroat trout, large-flowered fiddleneck, many-flowered navarretia, Mohave tui chub, Monterey spineflower, Myrtle’s silverspot butterfly, Point Areana mountain beaver, soft bird’s-beak, Solano grass, Steamboat buckwheat, Suisun thistle, and Owens pupfish.

October 8, 2008

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 12 species in California. Of the reviews being announced today, the Service has recommended delisting the Inyo California Towhee. When the Service removes species from the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants, they are “delisted.” To delist species, the Service is required to determine that threats have been eliminated or controlled, based on several factors including population sizes and trends and the stability of habitat quality and quantity.

The Service has recommended no change in status for the 11 other species reviewed.

These 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act. This list of completed reviews incorporates species that were noticed for review on March 22, 2006; February 14, 2007; and March 5, 2008. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status will require a separate rulemaking process.

More information about the species included in this announcement is found online:

Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office: Pierson’s milk-vetch, Riverside fairy shrimp, San Bernardino blue grass, and San Diego fairy shrimp

Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office: Burke’s goldfields, Contra Costa goldfields, Sebastopol meadowfoam, and Sonoma sunshine

Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office: Inyo California towhee, Lyon’s pentachaeta, purple amole, and Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep

The Inyo California Towhee (Pipilo fuscus eremophilus) is being recommended for delisting.

No status change is recommended for Burke’s goldfields, Contra Costa goldfields, Inyo California towhee, Lyon’s pentachaeta, Pierson’s milk-vetch, purple amole, Riverside fairy shrimp, San Bernardino blue grass, and San Diego fairy shrimp, Sebastopol meadowfoam, Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, and Sonoma sunshine.

View/download copies of the 5-year reviews.

Under the Act, the Service maintains a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). The Act also requires that we conduct a review of listed species at least once every 5 years and on the basis of such reviews determine whether or not any species should be removed from the List (delisted), or reclassified from endangered to threatened (downlisted) or from threatened to endangered (uplisted). Any change in federal classification requires a separate rulemaking process distinct from the 5-year review.

 

September 10, 2008

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 16 species in California. Of the reviews being announced today, the Service has recommended downlisting the Lane Mountain milk-vetch from endangered to threatened.  The Service has recommended no change in status for the 15 other species reviewed.

These 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act). This list of completed reviews incorporates species that were noticed for review on March 22, 2006, and February 14, 2007. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status will require a separate rulemaking process.

More information about the species included in this announcement can be found online:

Menzies’ wallflower - Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office
Vail Lake ceanothus - Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office.
Independence Valley speckled dace and Paiute cutthroat trout - Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office. Antioch Dunes evening-primrose, Butte County meadowfoam, Colusa grass, Contra Costa wallflower, few-flowered navarretia, Lange’s metalmark butterfly, and Sacramento Orcutt grass. - Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office.
Ben Lomond wallflower, island barberry, island phacelia, Lane Mountain milk-vetch, and marsh sandwort - Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office.

Recommended for downlisting is the Lane Mountain milk-vetch.

No status change is recommended for Antioch Dunes evening-primrose, Ben Lomond wallflower, Butte County meadowfoam, Colusa grass, Contra Costa wallflower, few-flowered navarretia, Independence Valley speckled dace, island barberry, island phacelia, marsh sandwort, Lange’s metalmark butterfly, Menzies’ wallflower, Paiute cutthroat trout, Sacramento Orcutt grass, and Vail Lake ceanothus.

Copies of the 5-year reviews are available at: http://www.fws.gov/cno/es/five_year_review_lists.html.

Under the Act, the Service maintains a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). The Act also requires that we conduct a review of listed species at least once every 5 years and on the basis of such reviews determine whether or not any species should be removed from the List (delisted), or reclassified from endangered to threatened (downlisted) or from threatened to endangered (uplisted). Any change in federal classification requires a separate rulemaking process distinct from the 5-year review.

May 12, 2008

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 14 species in California. Of the reviews being announced today, the Service has recommended downlisting for the San Clemente Island larkspur from endangered to threatened. The Service has recommended no change in status for the 13 other species reviewed.

These 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act). This list of completed reviews incorporates species that were noticed for review on July 7, 2005, March 22, 2006, and Feb. 14, 2007. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status will require a separate rulemaking process.

More information about the species included in this announcement are found online: Gowen cypress, Monterey gilia, Morro manzanita [ Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office ]. Ash-grey (Indian) paintbrush, Bear Valley sandwort, California taraxacum, San Clemente Island larkspur, San Jacinto Valley crownscale, southern mountain buckwheat, willowy monardella, El Segundo blue butterfly, Palos Verdes blue butterfly, and Delhi Sands flower-loving fly. [ Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office ]. Behrens’ silverspot butterfly [ Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office ],

No status change is recommended for ash-grey (Indian) paintbrush, Bear Valley sandwort, California taraxacum, Gowen cypress, Monterey gilia, Morro manzanita, San Clemente Island larkspur, San Jacinto Valley crownscale, southern mountain buckwheat, willowy monardella, Behrens’ silverspot butterfly, El Segundo blue butterfly, Palos Verdes blue butterfly, and Delhi Sands flower-loving fly.

Five Year Review Lists

March 5, 2008

The Service published a "Notice of Initiation of 5-Year Reviews; and Availability of Completed 5-Year Reviews" for 58 species in California, Nevada and southern Oregon in the Federal Register March 5, 2008. The Service completed 39 5-year reviews in FY 2007 and early FY 2008 for species in California, Nevada, and southern Oregon. Active reviews have also been initiated for 58 species. Click here to see the list of species contained in this announcement and obtain a copy of the review.

October 9, 2007

The Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 20 species in California on October 9. The reviews recommended two species for delisting, four for downlisting from endangered to threatened and no change in status for 14 others.

These 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act).  This list of completed reviews incorporates species that were noticed for review on July 7, 2005 and March 3, 2006. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. Any change in the listing status will require a separate rulemaking process. 

The species included in this announcement are: Plants:
Eureka Valley dunegrass (146kb)
Eureka Valley evening-primrose (149kb)
San Clemente Island broom (117kb)
San Clemente Island paintbrush (107kb)
San Clemente Island bushmallow (419kb)
Santa Cruz Island bushmallow (555kb)
Ben Lomond spineflower (310kb)
Catalina Island mountain mahogany (93kb)
Hoffman’s rockcress (231kb)
Howell’s spineflower (111kb)
San Clemente Island woodland star (452kb)
Chorro Creek bog thistle (400kb)
Yreka phlox (104kb)
Lepidoptera (butterflies, moths & skippers):
Kern primrose sphinx moth (229kb)
Laguna Mountains skipper (2.3mb)
Fish:
tidewater goby (528kb)
Invertebrates:
conservancy fairy shrimp (777kb)
longhorn fairly shrimp (636kb)
vernal pool fairy shrimp (863kb)
vernal pool tadpole shrimp (657kb)

October 2, 2006

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of 5-year reviews for 12 species in California on October 2, 2006.  The reviews recommend two species be delisted, four species be downlisted from endangered to threatened and no change in status for six species.

The 5-year reviews were undertaken as required by section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (Act) and were noticed for review on July 7, 2005. The 5-year review constitutes a recommendation by the Service. To change the status of a threatened or endangered species the Service must complete a rule-making process.  A draft rule will be proposed and published in the Federal Register. The Service then solicits public comment on the draft rule.
 
Until a species is formally delisted (i.e. the final rule is published with a delisting effective date) all the protections of the Endangered Species Act remain in place.  That means actions by Federal action agencies and property owners that might affect the species continue to need Endangered Species Act compliance through the consultation or Habitat Conservation Planning process.   Existing consultations, permitted Habitat Conservation Plans, and agreements made on behalf of the species remain in effect.

The species included this announcement are:
Western snowy plover (275kb PDF)
Kneeland prairie pennycress (705kd PDF)
Morro shoulderband snail (1.4mb PDF)
Hidden Lake bluecurls, (631kb)
California least tern, (1.9mb PDF)
Santa Cruz Island rock-cress (1.4mb PDF)
Island night lizard, (2.2mb PDF)
Giant garter snake (2.8mb PDF)
San Francisco garter snake (8.2mb PDF)
Valley elderberry longhorn beetle (1.6mb PDF)
Smith’s blue butterfly (1.6mb PDF)
Least Bell’s vireo (1.6mb PDF)

Completed Status Review for Klamath Sucker Populations

July 26, 2007

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has completed a comprehensive review of two listed fish in the Upper Klamath Basin, the Lost River sucker and the shortnose sucker. The review recommends that the fish should remain protected by the Endangered Species Act by maintaining the shortnose sucker status as endangered species and by reclassifying the Lost River sucker as threatened.

A recommendation to reclassify a species does not automatically result in a change in classification. Any change would require a separate formal rule-making process, including public review and comment, as defined in section 4(a) of the ESA. No change in classification would occur until the completion of that process.

In 2004, in a 90-day finding to a petition to delist the endangered Lost River sucker and shortnose suckers, the FWS announced it would initiate a 5-year review. In 2005, FWS organized an independent review panel of scientists to assist the FWS in evaluating the status of the two species. Based on the their report, a FWS panel review, and updated information on sucker survival rates from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2007, the FWS has completed 5-year reviews for the two sucker species. The FWS has determined that the shortnose sucker is at risk of extinction and should remain listed as endangered. The Lost River sucker are not at risk of extinction in the foreseeable future and should be reclassified as threatened.

Questions and Answers on Five-Year Review (14kb PDF)

Lost River Sucker Five Year Review (998kb PDF)

Shortnose Sucker Five Year Review (551kb PDF)

Completed Status Review for Delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus)

March 31, 2004.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) agreed to conduct a 5-year review of the delta smelt following two separate lawsuits, one filed by the California Farm Bureau Federation, et al., and the second filed by the San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority, et al., both in November 2002. The Service published a notice initiating the review on August 1, 2003, and requested new information on the delta smelt since it was listed in 1993.

After careful review and consideration of all the material in our files and information submitted during the comment period, our final 5-year review recommends no change to the threatened status of the delta smelt. See the delta smelt 5-year review for additional information.