Back in the nest!
CBFO biologist approaches foster nest. USFWS photo.
CBFO biologist approaches foster nest. USFWS photo.

On June 27th, a fierce thunderstorm ripped across the Chesapeake Bay. An osprey nest, on Shipping Creek in Stevensville MD, blew down. One young osprey managed to make it to shore where the landowner captured it and contacted Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research in Newark DE for advice. The young osprey was handed over to CBFO staff who in-turn handed the bird over to a Tri-State volunteer. After evaluation, the osprey was ready for release after a couple of days. On Monday June 30th, CBFO biologists placed the osprey in another nest located on a duck blind near the mouth of Shipping Creek. After monitoring the nest for a few minutes, both foster parents arrived and appeared to accept the youngster. Biologists will continue to check the nest.

Orphaned ospery, bottom right, joins new siblings in nest. USFWS photo.
Orphaned ospery, bottom right, joins new siblings in nest. USFWS photo.

This isn’t the first time biologists have been called to assist in relocating birds in trouble. On June 19th, a staff member of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michael's MD was kayaking near the museum when an osprey nest blew into the water. He paddled over and retrieved a young osprey, 3-4 weeks old. The bird was handed over to Tri-State for evaluation. CBFO biologists found an appropriate-aged nest for the release. After several days of rehabilitation, the osprey was handed over to CBFO biologists who placed the young in its new nest

And, back in February, seven immature brown pelicans were captured from Saint Mary’s County, Maryland. A restaurant owner who had been feeding the birds in the fall left for the winter. The birds failed to migrate, become malnourished and, because of the cold weather, began to get frostbite on their feet. The pelicans were brought to Tri-State where they received veterinary care and by the spring were ready to be released. On April 9th, biologists released the pelicans on Spring Island in the lower Chesapeake Bay. Within minutes of their release, 15 pelicans from a nearby colony appeared. The released pelicans immediately joined their new companions and flew off with them.

Newly released pelicans stand ready to rejoin their environment. USFWS photo.
Newly released pelicans stand ready to rejoin their environment. USFWS photo.

 

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