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Performance-Based Work Statement
Analytical Control Facility
Inorganic Contract 2012-2016
(Revised March 9, 2011)


Table of Contents

Part 1 - General Information

Part 2 - Definitions and Acronyms

Part 3 - Quality Control / Quality Assurance

Part 4 - Government Furnished Property Equipment, and Services

Part 5 - Contractor Furnished Items and Services

Part 6 - Specific Tasks

Part 7 - Reports

Part 8 - Services Summary



Part 1- General Information

1.0.   General
This solicitation will result in contracts to provide Technical Science- Analytical Services in Support of the Fish and Wildlife Service.  The primary goal of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), a Bureau of the Department of the Interior, is the conservation and sound management of sport fishery and wildlife resources for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans. Attainment of this goal requires continual collection, analysis and synthesis of new information on which wise and timely management decisions can be based. As a part of this decision making process, the Service has the responsibility for determining the effects of environmental contaminants on organisms and their habitats. A significant part of this responsibility requires the determination of trace amounts of inorganic compounds in fish tissue, wildlife, invertebrates, plants, water, soil, and sediments.

1.1.   Description of Services/Introduction
The Service is seeking analytical capability to perform inorganic analyses (primarily metals), in soil, sediment, animal or plant tissues, and water. The Service is fully aware that there may be no technically qualified analytical lab available which can accommodate the annual estimated quantity of samples stated herein (especially when the seasonal nature of the sample submissions is considered). Moreover, it is possible that the number of samples may be significantly higher during some years because of year to year inconsistencies in demand and available funding. Therefore, the Service is prepared to award multiple contracts in order to assure that there will be sufficient analytical capability to meet the estimated annual need. 

Due to the ever changing analytical needs the Service will be awarding contracts to analytical labs that can perform all the required analyses and they will also provide contracts to analytical labs that may not provide all the Mandatory analyses (Section C.3.1, C.3.2, and C.3.5) but have proven proficiency in performing analyses of some of the Non-Mandatory analyses referred to in Section C.3.6.

1.2.  Background
As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the Department of the Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally owned public lands and natural resources. This includes protecting our fish and wildlife, preserving the environmental and cultural values of our nation's parks and historical places, and providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor recreation.

Studies conducted by the Service in which some may be used in litigation cover a wide spectrum of contaminant problems and geographic areas. These include studies involving inorganic compounds derived from agriculture, mining, energy development, industrial, and other activities. Because of the diversity of studies and the unique requirements of individual studies, "catalogs" of samples submitted for analyses may vary considerably.

1.3. Objectives 

1.3.1. In accordance with the requirement listed herein, the Contractor shall be responsible for all aspects of this effort and shall furnish all necessary services, materials, labor, and supplies not otherwise indicated to be furnished by the Government.

1.3.2. The contractor must have available, all of the equipment required to perform the analyses as proposed. This will include Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometers(ICP) and/or ICP Mass Spec, Atomic Absorption Spectrometers (including cold vapor instrumentation), as well as the equipment needed to prepare the samples for analyses and the freezer capacity to store the samples before and after the analysis.

1.3.3. Due to the nature of the field sample collection season, most of the samples submitted, under this program, arrive at the laboratory over a very short period of time each year. The laboratory should not plan on even sample submissions over the course of the year. The Service has tended to issue over 60% of its analytical delivery orders during the months of July, August and September. The samples tend to arrive within 30 days of the issuance of the delivery order. Submissions tend to drop to near zero during October, November, and December, and slowly increase starting in late January. A large freezer capacity is needed to store the samples and offerors should be prepared to perform analyses within the required time-frames.

1.3.4.  Extracts/digests of samples submitted for analysis will be retained for one year after the analytical report is accepted. The contractor will be required to store up to one year, all un-analyzed portions of samples (up to 200g) submitted for analysis during the period of performance until disposition is approved by the Service Contracting Officer Technical Representative (COTR). Method of storage will be by freezing at or below -20 degrees Celsius. Disposition includes either disposal or return to the submitter.

1.3.5.  Periodically, the contractor will receive samples that will require additional analyses to be performed at another laboratory. In these cases the contractor is required to homogenize the samples and forward, at government expense, the appropriate subsample, to the other laboratories within three weeks after receiving the samples. Samples are "received" when all of the following criteria have been satisfied.

1.3.6. The Contractor’s technical proposal will be incorporated herein by reference into any contract awarded as a result of this solicitation. In the event of a conflict between the provisions of the technical proposal and any other clause of this contract (including, but not limited to, the statement of work), the conflict shall be resolved in accordance with FAR 52.215-33, Order of Precedence.

The detailed technical content of the proposal is an important factor in the selection of the Contractor for award of this contract. It is agreed therefore, that in the performance of this contract, the Contractor shall not deviate from the approved methodologies without the prior approval of the COTR. If it is necessary for the Contractor to deviate from the approved procedures in order to comply with the requirements of this contract, the contract shall be modified at the discretion of the Government at no increase in cost/price or extension of the delivery schedule.

1.4.   Scope of Work

1.4.1. The contractor is required to analyze the samples in a manner that meets the quality controls standards stated herein. Deviations from the contractor’s approved methods will require the prior approval of the COTR.

1.4.2.  MANDATORY METALS SCAN will include quantification of the following twenty-three metals:

Arsenic

Boron

Iron

Sodium

Selenium

Cadmium

Lead                                                                                                                                

Strontium

Mercury

Calcium

Magnesium

Thallium

Aluminum

Chromium

Manganese

Vanadium

Barium

Cobalt

Molybdenum

Zinc

Beryllium

Copper

Nickel

 

1.4.3.  Additional Required Determinations

  • All samples shall be pre-weighed before homogenization providing an initial whole weight.
  • For each non-water sample, the percent moisture will be determined.
  • All sample preparation and analysis must be performed within the EPA required holding times.
  • Upon request, the contractor is required to analyze soil/sediment samples for Grain size (reported as Percent clay, sand, and silt) and /or Total Organic Carbon.

1.4.4.  Full Data Report
Upon request, the contractor will provide a paper report that includes copies of all raw data. The report will include copies of all records related to the analysis that exists at the laboratory. Specifically any existing documents related to receipt of the samples, logs on sample storage and preparation, reports on instrument calibration, instrument printouts, calculation sheets, data summaries, internal QC documents, analyst notes or any other information about the sample in question. The request for a full data report can be made before or after the analysis.

1.4.5. Rapid Turnaround
Upon request, the contractor will provide analysis on a rapid turnaround basis for an additional charge. Rapid turnaround requires the final report to be submitted to the Service within 20 calendar days of receipt of the samples whereas the normal turnaround time is 75 days.

1.4.6.   Mandatory Analyses
On occasion, additional elements, or a different combination of elements from the metals scan will be requested.  The most commonly requested modified scan is for selenium or mercury alone. Also, it is possible that special detection limits will be needed. Therefore, it is required that the contractor provides the following analytical techniques:

  • Cold Vapor Mercury Atomic Absorption
  • Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy
  • ICP-Mass Spectrometry

1.4.7.   Non-Mandatory Analyses
Periodically the Service has a need for other inorganic determinations such as:

Phosphorous

Sulfite

Neutron Activation

Radiochemistry

Nitrogen

Sulfate

Chromium (III), (VI)

Graphite Furnace

Nitrate

Acid Volatile Sulfides

Arsenic Speciation

Hydride Generation

Nitrite

AVS/SEM

Selenite

Methylmercury

Chloride

Organ-tins

Selenate

 

It is not required that an offeror provide these Non-Mandatory services, but if any offeror desires to do so, they should provide method descriptions and prices. The non-mandatory section is not limited to the listed analytes and procedures. Offerors should include in their proposal any inorganic analyses they wish to offer the Service.

1.5.  Period of Performance
The period of performance shall be for one (1) Base Year of 12 months and four (4) 12-month Option Years beginning at the date the contract is awarded.

1.6.  General Information

1.6.1.  Quality Control/Quality Assurance
The contract shall develop and maintain an effective quality control/quality assurance program to ensure services are performed in accordance with the FWS.  The contractor shall implement procedures within the guidelines of the FWS that identify, prevent and ensure non-recurrence of defective services.  The contractor’s quality control/quality assurance is the means by which the analytical lab assures that their work complies with the requirement of this contract.  The contractor’s QA/QC plan shall follow the guidelines include in Part 3 of this statement of work.  The quality control/quality assurance plan shall be submitted as part of the analytical proposal. 

1.6.2.  Place of Performance
The work to be performed under this contract will be performed at various facilities across the U.S., in analytical labs, as appropriate.

1.6.3.  Special Qualifications
The contractor shall be responsible for ensuring all employees possess education and experience qualifiers for each labor category needed for this project.

1.6.4. Post Award Conference/Periodic Progress Meetings
The contractor agrees to attend any post award conference convened by the contracting activity or contract administration office in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 42.5.  The Contracting Officer, Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR), and other Government personnel, as appropriate, may meet periodically with the Contractor to review the Contractor’s performance.  At these meeting the Contracting Officer will apprise the contractor of how the Government views the contractor’s performance and the Contract will apprise the Government of problems, if any, being experienced.  Appropriate action shall be taken to resolve outstanding issues.  These meetings shall be at no additional cost to the government.

1.6.5.  Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR)
The (COR) will be identified by a separate letter.  The COR monitors all technical aspects of the contract and assists in contract administration.  The COR is authorized to perform the following functions:  assure that the Contractor performs the technical requirements of the contract; perform inspections necessary in connection with contract performance: maintain written and oral communications with the Contractor concerning technical aspects of the contract; issue written interpretation of technical requirements; monitor Contractor’s performance and notifies both the Contracting Officer and Contractor of any deficiencies, A letter of designation issued to the COR, a copy of which is sent to the Contractor, states the responsibilities and limitation of the COR, especially with regard to changes in cost or price, estimates or changes in deliver dates.  The COR is not authorized to change any of the terms and condition of the resulting order.

1.6.6.  Key Personnel
The following personnel are considered key personnel by the government:  Contract Manager/Alternate Contract Manager.  The contractor shall provide a contract manager who shall be responsible for the performance of the work.  The name of this person and an alternate who shall act for the Contractor when the manager is absent shall be designated in writing to the Contracting Officer.  The contract manager or alternate shall have full authority to act for the Contractor on all contract matters relating to daily operation of this contract.

1.6.7.  Data Rights
The Government has unlimited rights t all documents/material produced under this contract.  The documents and materials may not be used or sold by the Contractor.  The Contractor shall request permission to publish or make public any data relating to this contract.


Part 2 - Definitions and Acronyms

2.0.  Definitions

2.1.  Definitions
As used throughout this FWS the following terms shall have the meaning set forth below:

2.1.1.  ACF
The Analytical Control Facility (ACF) is a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (Service) field station, under the Division of Environmental Quality.  ACF is dedicated to providing high quality environmental chemistry support to the Service and other Department of Interior Bureaus.

2.1.2.   Analyte
A substance or chemical constituent that is determined in an analytical procedure.

2.1.3.   Blank Spike
An analytical control sample consisting of all reagents that are included with a group of samples and has been spiked with a known quantity of the analyte(s) of interest.

2.1.4.   Blank Spike Duplicate
A duplicate of an analytical control sample consisting of all reagents that are included with a group of samples and has been spiked with a known quantity of the analytes(s) of interest.

2.1.5.   Catalog
A catalog is essentially a work request to have a number of samples analyzed for environmental contaminants.  ECDMS (see #7) is used to create a catalog when a submitter needs to have a set of samples analyzed for environmental contaminants.  Catalogs contain biological and site specific information about the requested analysis, cost code information, and special handling or processing that is needed.

2.1.6.   COTR
Contracting Officer Technical Representative

2.1.7.   ECDMS (Environmental Contaminants Data Management System)
A Web based application that is part of the Environmental Conservation On-line System (ECOS) suite of applications used by the Service.  ECDMS is used to store biological, geographical, chemical and administrative data from samples collected to assess environmental pollution.  This system allows environmental contaminant biologists and other USFWS personnel to both store and retrieve contaminant data on fish and wildlife and their supporting habitats.

2.1.8.   Lab Generated Sample
A sample that is created in the lab that is usually clean of analyte and can be used for a blank, duplicate or spiking.

2.1.9.   Matrix/Matrices
The components of the sample other than the analyte.  Matrices included in this contract are tissue, soil/sediment, plant and water.

2.1.10.   Matrix Duplicate
An intra- laboratory split of the same sample from a group. They are used to document the precision of a method in a given sample matrix. 

2.1.11.   Matrix Spike
A sample from the analytical group consisting of all reagents  included with a group of samples and has been spiked with a known quantity of the analyte(s) of interest.

2.1.12.   Percent Moisture
The quantity of water in a mass; expressed in percentage by the weight of water in the mass.

2.1.13.   Spiked Duplicate or Matrix Spike Duplicate
Intra- laboratory split samples spiked with identical concentrations of target analytes(s).  The spiking occurs prior to sample preparation and analysis.  They are used to document the precision and bias of a method in a given sample matrix.                                      

2.1.14.   Whole Weight
The original mass of sample that was received at the analytical lab before homogenization.


Part 3 - Quality Control / Quality Assurance

3.0.  Quality Control/Quality Control

3.1.1.  Offerors must supply a copy of a quality assurance plan which describes the steps used to assure a valid analysis. The operation of the laboratory must be in conformance with applicable portions of the Good Laboratory Practices regulations as stated in 40 CFR,part 160. Specifically:

SUBPART B Organization & Personnel

  • 160.29 a, b, d, e
  • 160.31 a, b, d, e,f  
  • 160.33 b, c, f
  • 160.35 a, b.6

SUBPART C Facilities

  • 160.41
  • 160.51

SUBPART D Equipment

  • 160.61
  • 160.63 a, b, c

SUBPART E Testing Facilities Operation

  • 160.81 a (SOPs must exist and deviations must be documented), b.3, b.5, b.11, c
  • 160.83

SUBPART G Protocol for and Conduct of a Study

  • 160.130 e

SUBPART J Records and Reports

  • 160.185 a.6 (see reporting requirements)

Additionally, the plan must address the following topics and meet any minimums listed (for the purposes of this program, all samples are treated as one of four matrices, animal tissue, plant material, soil/sediment, or water):

3.1.2.   Assuring a Valid Sample

  • Sample validation upon receipt: condition, identification, and integrity.
  • Storage requirements: time and conditions before and after analysis.
  • Maintaining the Chain of Custody of the samples.
  • Actions required if problems arise in A, B, or C above must be clearly defined in Standard Operating Procedures. Especially if a storage system failure occurs

3.1.3.   Assuring a Valid Measurement Process

  • Only validated methods should be used. Validation includes, at a minimum:
    • Calculation of the Method Detection Limit for each analyte in each matrix.
    • Documentation that minimum acceptable precision has been achieved.
    • Documentation that minimum acceptable accuracy has been achieved.
    • Standard Operating Procedures must be up-to-date, and followed.
    • A state of control must be demonstrated through control charts covering both precision and accuracy
  • Instrument Calibration.
    • Standards must be "in-date" as defined in a Standard Operating Procedure.
    • Standard curves must be run for each analyte.
    • Standard curves must be established with at least three points, in addition to zero.
    • Linearity must be established with a regression coefficient of Linearity must be established with a regression coefficient of >.995
    • Mid-range calibration standards must be analyzed after every tenth sample and the last injection of any run must be a standard.
  • Samples must be quantified within the demonstrated linear range for the analytical run.
  • Limit of detection measurements must be made at least annually. This limit is considered the minimum limit of detection. It is recognized that on an infrequent basis, it may be necessary to adjust detection limits upward to account for interferences in the samples. In such cases the lab will consult with the COTR.
  • Control charts demonstrating a state of control in both precision and accuracy will be established and maintained for each matrix. These charts may be requested at any time by the COTR.

3.1.4.   Assuring Precision
Samples will be analyzed in duplicate at a rate of 5%, with at least one duplicate per matrix per analytical run. This requirement is waived when there is insufficient sample to perform a duplicate analysis.  During this occurrence the lab is required to include a spiked blank duplicate (spiked duplicate/lab generated duplicate) to assure precision of the data set.

3.1.5.  Assuring Accuracy

  • At a rate of 5 %, with at least one spike per matrix per analytical run, a sample will be fortified with a known quantity of analyte and analyzed as part of the run. The spike level should be between 10 and 50 times the limit of detection, or the expected analyte concentration, whichever is higher. If there is insufficient sample to analyze a spike of the submitted samples, the laboratory is required to include a spiked blank/lab generated spike to assure accuracy of the data set.
  • At a rate of 5%, with at least one per analytical run, a procedural blank will be analyzed.
  • At a rate of 5%, with at least one per matrix per analytical run, a Standard Reference Material will be analyzed. Standard Reference Materials provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), NRCC Certified Reference Materials, and ERA Certified Reference Materials are acceptable. Prior approval of the COTR is required for the use of other SRMs for use in this program.

3.1.6.   Limits of Detection
For the purposes of this contract, the Limit of Detection is the "Method Limit of Detection" as described by the Environmental Protection Agency in 40 CFR Part 136, Appendix B. In summary, the limit of detection is defined as the Student's t for 99% confidence times the standard deviation of seven replicate measurements of the same low level sample.

The following is a list of the analytes to be determined under the Metals Scan and the minimum acceptable limit of detection in tissues, soils/sediments, and water for that scan. The minimum acceptable limit assumes an adequate weight of sample was submitted for analysis.

Minimum Acceptable Method Detection Limits


Analyte

Tissues
(ppm)

(Dry Weight)

Sediment
(ppm)

(Dry Weight)

Water
(ppm)

(Wet Weight)

Arsenic

     0.50

     0.50

     0.005

Selenium

     0.50

     1.0

     0.0002

Mercury

     0.20

     0.20

     0.001

Aluminum

     5.0

    10.

     0.05

Boron

     2.0

    10.

     0.10

Barium

     1.0

     1.0

     0.005

Beryllium

     0.10

     0.20

     0.0005

Cadmium

     0.10

     0.20

     0.0005

Calcium

5.00

2.00

0.300

Chromium

     0.50

     1.0

     0.003

Cobalt

0.50

0.50

0.005

Copper

     0.50

     1.0

     0.005

Iron

     5.0

    10.

     0.10

Magnesium

5.0

    10.

     0.10

Manganese

     1.0

     5.0

     0.005

Molybdenum

     2.0

     5.0

     0.05

Nickel

     0.50

     5.0

     0.005

Lead

     0.50

     5.0

     .005

Sodium

140

180

20

Strontium

     0.50

     5.0

     0.001

Thallium

2.00

.020

.0020

Vanadium

     0.50

     1.0

     0.001

Zinc

     1.0

     5.0

     0.01

Offerors should list the Limits of Detection routinely obtained in their laboratory for all elements for which analyses are routinely performed.

3.1.7.   Precision and Accuracy Acceptance Criteria
The recovery of the spiked analyte will be utilized as the principal measure of accuracy used to assess the quality of the data submitted. The average recovery of analyte from spiked tissue and water should be between 80 and 120 %.

Additionally, when charted the spike recoveries must indicate that the procedure is in a state of control. Approximately 95 % of the points should be within 2 standard deviations of the mean. In computing the averages, only valid spikes will be used. In a valid spike, the amount of analyte added is at a minimum as much as was present in the sample of origin. It is understood that some analytes in some matrices, especially soil and sediment given the strong acid digestion, may not meet this criterion. In the proposal, the offeror should list those analytes and matrices for which the proposed method will not meet this requirement. Separate charts are to be maintained for each matrix, for each analyte.

Standard Reference Materials also serve as a measure of the accuracy of the analysis. The assessment of the reference material analyses is based upon the range in the certificate as well as the precision of the analysis. The principal measure of precision will be the average relative percent difference (RPD) between duplicates. It is understood that an acceptable RPD will change depending on the proximity of the analyte concentration to the limit of detection.
Data reported under this contract will be evaluated according to the table below based on the average analyte concentration of the duplicate pair.

Average Analyte Concentration (Multiples of the Detection Limit)

Maximum Acceptable Average Relative Percent Difference

0-2

200 %

2-10

7.3 %

>10

8.6 %

Additionally, when charted the RPDs must indicate that the procedure is in a state of control. Approximately 95 % of the points should be within 2 standard deviations of the mean.

The numbers above, result in an estimate of the 95 % confidence interval for the method of + 30 % for concentrations between 2-10 limits of detection, and + 15 % for concentrations > 10 limits of detection.

Separate charts are to be maintained for each matrix, for each analyte. Separate charts can be maintained for each concentration group, or alternatively a Range Ratio chart can be maintained.

  • Average moisture RPDs shall be less than 5 %.
  • Average Total Organic Carbon RPDs shall be less than 10 %.
  • Average grain size RPDs shall be less than 20%.

In computing Relative Percent difference, if the concentration of analyte is less than the limit of detection, take 50% of the limit of detection for use in the calculation.
In addition to the quality control performed in conjunction with the actual analyses, the Service will on a periodic basis send proficiency check samples to the laboratory. These samples may or may not be labeled as such. Any group of samples analyzed by the offeror is subject to call back to the Service for reanalysis in one of its own laboratories. The service will, on occasion, request copies of all raw data for the purpose of conducting a data audit. It is a requirement that the offeror take whatever steps are necessary to correct any deficiencies uncovered.

Contractor shall provide copies of control charts to the COTR, upon request.

3.1.8.   Corrective Actions
It is required that whenever a quality control sample does not meet the standards listed above, that the procedures be reviewed by the contractor in an attempt to ascertain the cause of the error. If errors are found, the analyses shall be repeated from the point of the error. If no errors can be found and the quality control failure appears to indicate that most of the scan is questionable, the analyses shall be repeated. If it appears the quality control failure impacted a small number of the analytes within the scan, the Fish and Wildlife Service Quality Assurance Officer shall be contacted for a decision. Any corrective action must be applied to all samples analyzed concurrently with the sample which initiated the action.

It cannot be stated strongly enough that simply flagging quality control errors is NOT a sufficient action.

3.1.9.   Access to Methods Used
Much of the data provided under the contract will be submitted as part of a scientific publication and/ or used in litigation. It is required that successful offerors provide the Service with either a literature citation that completely describes the methods used or provides the Service with an electronic copy of the procedures used which will be published by the Service on the World Wide Web.


Part 4 - Government Furnished Property, Equipment, and Services

4.0  Government Furnished Items and Services

4.1. The Government will list items and services provides by the Government for each task order.


Part 5 - Contractor Furnished Items and Services


5.0  Contractor Furnished Items and Responsibilities

5.1.  General
The Contractor shall furnish all supplies, equipment, facilities and services required to perform work under this contract that are not listed under PART 4 of this FWS and the following.

5.1.1. Hard-copy publications and/or e-files of papers, reports, findings, manuals, proceedings and/or other documents, as appropriate and requested.


Part 6 - Specific Tasks

6.0  Specific Tasks

6.1.1. For a specific catalog, all samples:

  • Even if shipped in different boxes, shall arrive at the laboratory intact (not broken) and properly labeled.
  • Shall have the sample identification number as listed in the ECDMS “Working Catalog Report”.
  • Shall match the work described in the delivery order.
  • The lab provides the Service with a lab integrity report indicating when the samples were received, any problems encountered and how they were resolved (for example, broken sample jars, unmatched sample labels, and etc.), and the lab approval date.  See Section C.6.1 for details.

6.1.1.  Sample Types
Sample types to be submitted include:

  • Animal tissues (whole bodies or organs, fish, wildlife, blood, serum, invertebrates and eggs)
  • Plants
  • Sediment/Soil
  • Water
  • Other matrices will at times be submitted

6.1.2.   Sample Homogenization
The Contractor must be capable of homogenizing samples with the following wet weight ranges:

  • Animal or plant matrices - up to 5 kg
  • Soil or sediment - up to 5 kg

While most samples will weigh from 30 g to 1 Kg, on occasion samples may exceed the ranges listed above. If problems occur in homogenizing such samples, advice is available from the COTR. Samples should be homogenized so that replicate analyses meet the criteria listed under Quality Control (Section C.4).


Part 7 - Reports

7.0.   Reports

7.1.  Lab Integrity Report
For each catalog (set of samples) received, the lab is required to provide the Service with a lab integrity report consisting of the following:

  • Lab Receipt Date The date that the samples were received at the lab. This includes samples received from other labs as aliquots.
  • Any problems encountered with regard to the samples, paper work, sample integrity, sample labels, missing samples, broken samples, and so forth.
  • How any problems encountered were resolved.
  • Lab Approval Date The date that all aspects of the catalog and samples are correct and all problems have been resolved.
  • The initial lab integrity report with the lab receipt date shall be completed within 48 hours of sample receipt.
  • The lab must provide an updated projected completion date (PCD) and justification of lateness using ECDMS when the results are not received based on the computed PCD.

Furthermore, the lab is required to provide the lab integrity report using the Service’s secure Internet application ECDMS.  For additional information on ECDMS and the functions included relating to the lab integrity report, See “Section J”.  

7.1.2.          Reporting Sample Results
The Fish and Wildlife Service has a secure Internet application (ECDMS) for reporting sample analyses and QA/QC results. All sample results will be reported using ECDMS with the exception certain non-routine analyses.

Section J details the specifications, the data format, and method of transfer that will be used.  The contractor may be required to modify the report format at no-additional costs, as further development of the system takes place or requirements change.

Special Note The Service is updating our analytical results reporting requirements, with the goal of making them simpler for labs to report their results electronically. This process is not yet complete and may not be complete by the time contacts are awarded. In the interim, we are willing to work with each lab to come up with the best way to report all analytical and QA/QC results. Most, if not all the analytical fields currently reported by our contact labs will still be required. See Section J for details of the reporting formats that are currently being used.

7.1.3.  Routine Paper Reports
Paper reports shall be provided to the Service upon request. These reports must include the following:

  • A Description of the samples, their condition on receipt, and storage prior to analysis.
  • A brief summary of the analytical procedures.
  • Analytical results, reported as ppm dry weight, or as % in the case of moisture, TOC, or grain size determinations. Water samples are reported on a wet weight basis.
  • Quality Assurance Report including:
    • Results of procedural blank analyses.
    • Results of duplicate analyses, including a computation of the average, and the relative percent difference.
    • Results of spiked sample analyses, including the percent recovery, and the amount in the original sample.
    • Estimate of the limit of detection, on a sample by sample basis. (This shall be included in the results section).
    • Discussion of any problems with the analyses.

Part 8 - Services Summary

8.0   Services Summary
The Government has the right to inspect all services required in the contract.  The purpose of the Services Summary is to define performance evaluation and payment procedures.  The Performance Objective (Column 1) describes what the government will survey.

Performance Objective

FWS Section

Performance Threshold

Methods of Surveillance

Confidence level

Part 3

>  95%

Ongoing

Facility evaluation

Part 3

95%

Periodic Surveillance

Turnaround Time

1.4.5

90%

Ongoing

Technical Analysis

Part 1, 3, 7, 6

100%

Periodic Surveillance

Quality Control Plan

Part 3

100%  Compliance

Random Sampling