At a Glance

2005

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The 2014 program application deadline is December 3.

Since 2002, more than $46.5 million in grants.

Grants have supported 422 projects in 36 countries.

Partners have contributed an additional $178.5 million.

More than 3.25 million acres of habitat affected.

Funding for the following 37 projects was approved in April 2005. A total of $3.92 million in funding was approved with project partners contributing $17.6 million in matching funds and $271,107 in nonmatching funds to affect 567,175 acres of habitat. This information is accurate as of the date of approval. For further information about specific grant projects, please contact the grantee listed in individual project summaries. Project Summary Table, U.S. Projects, U.S. - Latin American and Caribbean Projects, Latin American and Caribbean Projects.

U.S. Projects

CALIFORNIA
Project: Diversity and Productivity of Neotropical Migratory Landbirds in Central Coastal California.
Location: Monterey County.
Congressional District: 17.
Grantee: Ventana Wilderness Society’s Big Sur Ornithology Lab.
Contact: Jessica Griffiths, (831) 455-9514, jessicagriffiths@ventanaws.org.
Partners: Monterey Peninsula Water Management District, California Department of Parks and Recreation, Dean Witter Foundation, Monterey Peninsula Audubon Society, Harden Foundation, Homeland Foundation, and David and Lucille Packard Foundation.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $20,000.
Matching Funds: $74,500.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 32.
Ecoregion: NA1202 and NA1203.
In central California’s coastal region, riparian habitat—essential to migratory birds—is threatened primarily by commercial and residential water use, agricultural runoff, and development. Here, project partners will use their $20,000 grant and $74,500 in partner contributions to implement a comprehensive neotropical migratory landbird monitoring program. They will evaluate and monitor populations of landbirds, quantify riparian habitat features, and evaluate habitat quality at eight study sites on three major watersheds, uniting several, distinct conservation projects that are under different conservation agencies’ jurisdictions throughout the county. Partners also will compare the sites’ ecosystem health to aid in developing adaptive habitat management strategies. In addition, demonstrations will be conducted for the public at the project’s mist-netting stations to increase awareness about bird conservation and research.
COLORADO
Project: A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Colorado.
Location: 43 counties.
Congressional District: 1 through 7.
Grantee: Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.
Contact: David Hanni, (970) 482-1707, david.hanni@rmbo.org.
Partners: Colorado Division of Wildlife and NatureServe.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $122,400.
Matching Funds: $368,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Intermountain West.
BCR: 10 and 16.
Ecoregion: NA0511, NA1304, and NA1313.
Increasing development poses threats to Colorado’s coniferous and aspen forest habitats and, consequently, to the migratory bird populations they support. Project partners will use their $122,400 grant to develop a “conservation blueprint” to guide future land-use planning decisions and avian conservation in the State’s western montane region. The blueprint will be based on output generated by NatureServe Vista, a modeling algorithm which can take into account such parameters as bird distribution/abundance, conservation priorities and quantitative goals, threats, and conservation opportunities. By integrating existing, statewide bird population data into BIOTICS, a geospatially referenced database that interfaces with NatureServe Vista, partners will be able to identify areas with the greatest potential for conserving high-priority bird species. Partners are contributing $322,500 to advance the conservation goals of this project, which are aligned with those of Partners in Flight.
Project: Assessment and Conservation of Playas in Eastern Colorado.
Location: 28 counties.
Congressional District: 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7.
Grantee: Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory.
Contact: Alison Banks-Cariveau, (970) 482-1707, alison.cariveau@rmbo.org.
Partners: Playa Lakes Joint Venture and Colorado Division of Wildlife.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $26,666.
Matching Funds: $114,860.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Playa Lakes.
BCR: 18.
Flyway: Central.
Ecoregion: NA0815.
Playas—small, circular, ephemeral wetlands found throughout the central and southern Great Plains—constitute more than 90 percent of the wintering habitat for Central Flyway waterfowl, and provide key stopover habitat for long-distance migratory shorebirds. Because little is known about the resource values of eastern Colorado’s playas, project partners will use their $26,666 grant to conduct a systematic ground-truthing survey of approximately 300 of them, assessing their distribution, size, location, soils, vegetation, hydrology, disturbance, and bird use, especially during spring and fall migration. This study will build on the data partners collected on more than 600 playas in 2004, providing additional information to guide science-based, playa-conservation planning. Some $114,860 in partner funds will help to advance this project’s conservation goals, and those of Partners in Flight and U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan.
ILLINOIS
Project: Effects of Off-channel Wetland Restoration on Breeding Neotropical Migratory Birds.
Location: Illinois’ Union, Johnson, Pulaski, and Alexander Counties.
Congressional District: 12 and 19.
Grantee: Illinois Natural History Survey/University of Illinois.
Contact: Jeff Hoover, (352) 392-1721 extension 511, jhoover@flmnh.ufl.edu.
Partners: Illinois Department of Natural Resources.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $22,736.
Matching Funds: $80,192.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 24 and 26.
Ecoregion: NA0404 and NA0409.
Stream channelization in southern Illinois’ Cache River watershed has lead to the formation of lateral gullies, ranging in size from 10- to 50-feet wide and 6- to 30-feet deep. These gullies drain off-channel forested wetlands (adjacent to the main river channel) at unnaturally rapid rates, exposing the nests of forest-breeding neotropical migratory birds to very high rates of predation. Partners will use their $22,736 grant to document how ongoing off-channel wetland hydrology restoration (via plugging the gullies that drain them) is affecting the diversity, abundance, and nesting success of breeding, neotropical migratory birds—particularly the prothonotary warbler. Partners will monitor and compare the off-channel wetlands’ pre and postrestoration characteristics, and monitor the species’ response to the habitats’ changing conditions. Some $80,192 in partner funds will help to advance this project’s goals and those of the Cache River Joint Venture. Data collected also will help guide management practices on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge, within the project area, and at other bottomland-hardwood forests elsewhere in the country.
Project: Restoring Large Native Prairies for Breeding Grassland Birds.
Location: Illinois’ Cook County.
Congressional District: 2, 8, and 13.
Grantee: Audubon-Chicago Region.
Contact: Judy Pollock, (847) 965-1150, jpollock@audubon.org.
Partners: Corporation for Open Lands.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $55,041.
Matching Funds: $165,124.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 22.
Ecoregion: NA0804.
Project partners will use their $55,041 grant and $165,124 in partner funds to restore public hayfields and degraded grasslands on the outskirts of Chicago, the Nation’s third largest population center, for the benefit of grassland birds, such as Henslow’s and grasshopper sparrows and bobolink. Efforts will be focused within three of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County’s preserves: Spring Creek Valley, Bartel Grassland, and Orland Grassland. Partners will create two Bird Conservation Areas—one at Spring Creek Valley, having a core of at least 1,500 grassland acres, and one at Bartel Grassland, which incorporates the Orland preserve and has a core of at least 600 grassland acres. In these core areas, invasive brush and woody vegetation will be removed and replaced with native species, restoring 1,775 acres of habitat. Partners will monitor the response of grassland birds, and will galvanize a community volunteer corps to assist in the long-term maintenance, restoration, and monitoring of the sites. Partners’ efforts will help to advance the conservation goals of Partners in Flight.
NATIONAL: U. S.
Project: Conserving Important Bird Areas for Neotropical Migrants of Conservation Concern.
Location: Nationwide.
Congressional District: Nationwide.
Grantee: National Audubon Society.
Contact: Greg Butcher, (202) 861-2242 extension 3034, gbutcher@audubon.org.
Partners: Ford Motor Company and Monsanto.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $20,000.
Matching Funds: $285,600.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: Nationwide.
Ecoregion: Nationwide.
To date, nearly 2,000 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) have been established across the continental United States. Using existing IBA population data or working with state IBA coordinators and resident bird experts, partners will determine occurrence and abundance of those neotropical migratory bird species also included on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s U.S. Birds of Conservation Concern list. Using the grantee’s upgraded, online IBA database, partners will produce detailed, species- and/or IBA-specific reports on neotropical migrants of concern in the United States, increasing the amount of information available to resource managers and conservationists. Information will be prioritized according to species’ conservation needs or the most important sites for each species. Partners will share data and reports with conservationists throughout the Western Hemisphere, promoting cross-border projects that conserve top-priority species at the IBA(s) most important to their survival. A $20,000 grant and $285,600 in partner funds will help to advance this project’s conservation goals, which also support those of Partners in Flight, U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan, and North American Waterbird Conservation Plan.
NEW YORK
Project: Making Buildings Safe for Neotropical Migratory Birds.
Location: New York’s New York County.
Congressional District: 14.
Grantee: New York City Audubon.
Contact: E.J. McAdams, (212) 691-7483, ejmcadams@nycaudubon.org.
Partners: New York City Audubon volunteers.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $43,000.
Matching Funds: $129,890.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 30.
Ecoregion: NA0411.
Millions of neotropical migratory birds die each year en route between breeding and wintering grounds due to collisions with manmade structures, particularly buildings. Extensive use of glass and decora¬tive night-lighting in cityscapes and other densely populated, developed areas can disorient, distract, and misguide migratory birds, causing collisions or exhaustion from excessive, confused flight. The grantee will use its $43,000 grant and $129,890 in matching funds to expand research and monitoring of this threat in New York City, and will work with the architectural and landscape design community, building managers, real estate boards, glass designers, and elected officials to identify effective ways to minimize collisions. The grantee also will continue its volunteer-based Safe Flight Program, collecting data on collisions and educating the public about the hazards of urban landscapes to migratory birds. This project will help to advance the conservation goals of Partners in Flight.
PENNSYLVANIA
Project: Silvicultural Impacts on Cerulean Warblers and other Priority Forest Birds.
Location: Pennsylvania’s Warren, McKean, Forest, and Jefferson Counties.
Congressional District: 5.
Grantee: USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station.
Contact: Scott Stoleson, (814) 563-1040, sstoleson@fs.fed.us.
Partners: Ruffed Grouse Society, Collins Pine Company, Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resource Conservation, and Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $10,388.
Matching Funds: $31,164.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 28.
Ecoregion: NA0401.
Shelterwood cutting is an intermediate silvicultural technique used widely across the northeast region that creates partial openings in forests. It remains unclear whether, and to what degree, such small-scale disturbances within extensively forested areas have adverse effects on forest birds. Partners will use their $10,388 grant and $31,164 in partner funds to assess the impacts of shelterwood-cutting practices on the cerulean warbler and 11 other forest-bird species considered high priority for conservation in the region by Partners in Flight. The cerulean warbler is also on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ U.S. Birds of Conservation Concern list. Partners will quantify and compare the abundance, density, and demographic rates of forest-interior bird species at five sites, each containing three study plots: a shelterwood-cut stand, an uncut forest area adjacent to it, and another distant from it. Such data will help public and private forest managers to develop silvicultural practices that better support a diversity of neotropical migratory birds.
PUERTO RICO
Project: Expanding a Shorebird Monitoring Network in Puerto Rico through Local Participation.
Location: 15 shoreline sites around Puerto Rico, including one on Culebra Island.
Grantee: Puerto Rican Ornithological Society, Inc. (PROS).
Contact: Verónica Anadón, (787) 243-5395, directivasopi@yahoo.com.
Partners: Eco-Electrica, University of Puerto Rico, BirdLife International, Puerto Rico Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and PROS volunteers.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $53,140.
Matching Funds: $166,415.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
BCR: None.
Flyway: Atlantic–Caribbean.
Ecoregion: NT0155, NT0226, NT1410, and NT1416.
Some 150 neotropical bird species?34 of which are shorebirds, including the federally endangered piping plover?seek stopover or overwintering habitat in Puerto Rico and on its islands, located in the Atlantic–Caribbean Flyway. However, many of the sites are threatened by development or unsustainable land-use practices. In 2001, the grantee began its volunteer-based Shorebird Monitoring Network, establishing 13 coastal bird-monitoring sites. Partners will use their $53,140 grant and $166,415 in partner funds to expand this effort to two more sites. They will determine species presence and abundance, and will statistically analyze and compare the data among the 15 sites. At least one “Site Support Group” will be formed, comprised of local decision-makers, citizens, and other stakeholders. Additionally, partners will continue to train volunteers and raise public awareness about shorebird conservation via workshops and presentations. This project supports the conservation goals of the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan.
TEXAS
Project: Reddish Egret Recovery on the Texas Gulf Coast.
Location: Nine counties in Texas.
Congressional District: 14 and 27.
Grantee: National Audubon Society-Audubon Texas.
Contact: Ned Wright, (361) 884-2634, nwright@audubon.org.
Partners: Audubon Texas volunteers.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $25,000.
Matching Funds: $159,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 37.
Flyway: Central.
Ecoregion: NA0701.
According to population-trend data from annual colonial waterbird censuses in the Texas Gulf Coast region, the reddish egret has shown a 30-percent decline or greater over the last 30 years; today, only 1,000 breeding pairs remain. Factors fueling this species’ decline include imported red fire ants, lack of shrub vegetation for nesting, mammalian predators, human disturbance, and diminishing food resources. The grantee will use its $25,000 grant and $159,000 in matching funds to secure habitat-management leases on islands not currently under its management, and develop management plans for rookeries in the project area. The grantee and its volunteers will increase monitoring efforts for reddish egret and other waterbird species, enhance or begin measures to control fire ants and other predators, and install native plants and artificial nesting structures on project islands. More volunteers will be recruited to help with longer-term restoration and monitoring activities, benefiting all birds in the Central Flyway. This project’s goals support those of the North American Waterbird Conservation Plan.
VIRGIN ISLANDS: U. S.
Project: Avian Diversity and Habitat Relationships of Wintering Neotropical Migratory Songbirds and Resident Landbirds, Island of St. John.
Location: Virgin Islands National Park.
Grantee: USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station.
Contact: Sonja Oswalt, (865) 862-2058, soswalt@fs.fed.us.
Partners: University of Florida.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $27,000.
Matching Funds: $82,400.
Nonmatching Funds: $55,450.
BCR: None.
Flyway: Central.
Ecoregion: NT0134 and NT1310.
The USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis Program has long been monitoring multiple forest variables regularly on established plots throughout the United States and its territories. Partners will use their $27,000 grant and $82,400 in matching funds to add a bird-population monitoring component to the program. They will conduct avian point-counts on plots within the Virgin Islands National Park, which covers about two-thirds of the 5,180-hectare Island of St. John. They will assess avian diversity, distribution, relative abundance, density, and habitat use, and use these data in conjunction with remotely sensed data to develop species distribution maps. This project addresses overlapping goals of several federal conservation agencies, saving financial resources while gathering the information needed to better protect and manage for migratory birds in the park and elsewhere in the Caribbean. The Forest Service is providing an additional $55,450 in nonmatching funds to help advance this project, which supports the goals of Partners in Flight.

U.S. - Latin American and Caribbean Projects

Alabama—MEXICO
Project: Migratory Stopover Habitat Protection at Two Keystone Sites along the Gulf of Mexico.
Location: Alabama’s Mobile County and Laguna Madre area, Mexican State of Tamaulipas.
Congressional District: Alabama’s 1.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy (TNC).
Contact: David Mehlman, (505) 244-0535 extension 24, dmehlman@tnc.org.
Partners: Dauphin Island Bird Sanctuaries, Inc., Birmingham Audubon, Alabama Coastal Heritage Trust, Pronatura Noreste, and TNC-Alabama Field Office.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $250,000.
Matching Funds: $750,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Gulf Coast.
BCR: 27, 36, and 37.
Ecoregion: NA0529, NA0701, and NA1312.
Dauphin Island, Alabama, and Laguna Madre, Tamaulipas, are two key stopover sites on the Gulf of Mexico servicing more than 350 species of migratory birds that follow the trans- or circum-Gulf migration routes. In both locations, much-needed habitat continues to be threatened by development and conversion to other land uses. Project partners will use their $250,000 grant and $750,000 in partner funds to build on their previous work of protecting and managing important stopover habitat around the gulf. They will acquire 24 acres of salt marsh and upland habitats on Dauphin Island and another 2,900 upland acres within Laguna Madre. Their efforts address the objectives of Partners in Flight.
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas—MEXICO
Project: The Technical Assistance Project, Phase 2: Avian International Monitoring Network.
Location: 14 counties in Texas; St. Tammany, Jefferson, and Cameron Parishes in Louisiana; Hancock County in Mississippi; Mobile County in Alabama; Osceola County in Florida; and Mexican States of Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Campeche, Yucatan, and Quintana Roo.
Congressional District: Texas’ 2, 9, 14, 15, 22, 27, 29; Louisiana’s 1, 3, and 7; Mississippi’s 4; Alabama’s 1; and Florida’s 15.
Grantee: Gulf Coast Bird Observatory, Inc.
Contact: Cecilia M. Riley, (979) 480-0999, criley@gcbo.org.
Partners: Dauphin Island Bird Sanctuaries, Inc., Birmingham Audubon, Alabama Coastal Heritage Trust, Pronatura Noreste, and TNC-Alabama Field Office.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $49,538.
Matching Funds: $255,792.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Gulf Coast.
BCR: 25, 26 27, 31, 36, and 37.
Ecoregion: NA0409, NA0523, NA0529, NA0701, NA1312, NT0111, NT0154, NT0176, NT0181, NT0233, NT0235, and NT1403.
The Site Partner Network is a large partnership representing 30 U.S. and Mexican conservation organizations working at 54 sites in the Gulf of Mexico region. In this project’s second phase, the grantee will use a $49,538 grant and $255,792 in matching funds to provide technical assistance to site partners regarding fundraising, ecotourism, and communication and to begin expanding the network to Belize and Honduras. It also will work with partners to implement a systematic, standardized, gulf-wide, migration monitoring program, the groundwork for which was laid in phase one. Data gathered will be stored in a central, easily accessible database, enabling site partners to form an international avian monitoring network. Partners’ efforts will help to advance Partners in Flight’s goals for this region.
California—COSTA RICA, EL SALVADOR, FRENCH ANTILLES, GUATEMALA, HONDURAS, JAMAICA, MEXICO, NICARAGUA, PANAMA
Project: Habitat-management Strategies that Enhance Overwintering Survival of Migratory Landbirds.
Location: California’s Marin County; 22 sites in Mexico, 5 in Guatemala, 4 in El Salvador, 1 in Honduras, 7 in Nicaragua, 6 in Costa Rica, 2 in Panama, 2 in Jamaica, and 2 in French Antilles.
Congressional District: California’s 6.
Grantee: The Institute for Bird Populations.
Contact: David DeSante, (415) 663-2052, ddesante@birdpop.org.
Partners: 35 field station cooperators.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $139,624.
Matching Funds: $1,406,519.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: all those in Mexico.
Ecoregion: all those in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean.
In 2002, the grantee initiated the Monitoreo de Sobrevivencia Invernal (MoSI, Monitoring of Overwintering Survival) program, involving partners from 36 organizations across Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Through this program, partners assess habitat-specific information on the winter demography and physical condition of declining neotropical migratory birds, based on data they collect at over 50 mist-netting and bird-banding stations. Data suggest that long-term population trends of forest-inhabiting migratory birds are primarily driven by their winter survival rates. Partners will use their $139,624 grant and $1,406,519 in partner funds to expand the MoSI to 80 stations and continue collecting data on factors affecting population declines. Partners will use the data collected to date and during this project period to model the factors as functions of station-specific and landscape-scale habitat characteristics. Results of the modeling and analysis, to be conducted in California, will then be used to formulate habitat-management strategies for wintering grounds.
California, Oregon, Washington—EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, NICARAGUA
Project: Quercus and Aves III: Habitat Conservation, Population Enhancement, and Biological Objectives for Oak-associated Birds in North and Latin America.
Location:California’s Siskiyou County; Oregon’s Jackson County; Washington’s Pierce, Thurston, and Klickitat Counties; El Salvador’s Montecristo National Park and Rio Sapo; Guatemala’s Sierra de las Minas; and Nicaragua’s El Jaguar Reserve.
Congressional District: California’s 2; Oregon’s 2; and Washington’s 3, 4, and 9.
Grantee: American Bird Conservancy.
Contact: Bob Altman, (541) 745-5339, baltman@abcbirds.org.
Partners: Eight conservation organizations and three U.S. federal agencies.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $58,000.
Matching Funds: $750,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Pacific Coast and Central Valley.
BCR: 5 and 9.
Ecoregion: NA0512, NA0516, NA0524, and NT0303.
In the U.S. Pacific Northwest and in parts of Central America, oak habitats important to migratory birds are threatened by development, invasive plant species, and conversion to other land uses. Partners will use their $58,000 grant and $750,000 in partner funds to build on the habitat protection, restoration, and management objectives advanced in these regions in the project’s first two phases. In California, Oregon, and Washington, partners will monitor oak-associated bird species and develop spatially explicit population and habitat objectives for the area. Additionally in Washington, partners will protect up to 300 acres of oak and pine-oak habitat, reintroduce 10 pairs of western bluebirds and conduct outreach about the effort, and control invasive species in up to 80 acres of oak forests.
Colorado, New Mexico—MEXICO
Project: U.S.–Mexico Grassland Bird Conservation III.
Location: Colorado’s Weld County, New Mexico’s Roosevelt County, and Mexican State of Chihuahua.
Congressional District: Colorado’s 4 and New Mexico’s 3.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy.
Contact: Bob McCready, (206) 780-1102, bmccready@tnc.org.
Partners: Playa Lakes Joint Venture.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $250,000.
Matching Funds: $750,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Playa Lakes.
BCR: 18 and 35.
Ecoregion: NA0815 and NA1303.
North American Breeding Bird Survey trend analyses show that, as a group, grassland-dependent bird species’ populations have declined more dramatically, more consistently, and over a more widespread area than any other bird group on the continent in the last 25 years. Partners will use their $250,000 grant and $750,000 in partner funds to protect critical habitat for declining grassland bird species, building upon and expanding the work of this project’s first two phases. In eastern Colorado, partners will secure conservation easements on 4,000 acres of privately owned prairie habitat. In eastern New Mexico, an outreach program will be developed to build relationships with and offer habitat-management assistance to local, private landowners in shortgrass prairie and shinnery oak habitats. In Chihuahua, partners will acquire a 46,500-acre ranch located within the Janos Grasslands, and begin the third year of their grassland-bird monitoring program in the Janos/Casas Grandes Valley. Additionally, partners will pursue community outreach and capacity building activities at all three project sites. Their efforts advance the goals of Partners in Flight and U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan.
Georgia—ECUADOR
Project: Our Shared Forests: Ecuador and Georgia's Bird Conservation Partnership.
Location: All counties in Georgia; and Ecuador’s Provinces of Pichincha, Esmeraldas, and Imbabura.
Congressional District: All congressional districts in Georgia.
Grantee: Maquipucuna Foundation.
Contact: Rebeca Justicia, (593-2) 2507-200, rebeca@maquipucuna.org.
Partners: University of Georgia, Chocó Andes Alliance, and APROCANE (Ecuadorian farmers association).
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $235,038.
Matching Funds: $753,475.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 27, 28 and 29.
Ecoregion: NT0145 and NT0178.
Our Shared Forests is a U.S.-Ecuador partnership that uses a multidisciplinary approach to protect habitat for shared migratory bird species. Partners will use their $235,038 grant and $753,475 in partner funds to conserve habitat and raise environmental awareness in the Chocó Andean region of northwest Ecuador and throughout Georgia. In Georgia, partners will educate students, parents, teachers, and community members statewide about “their” birds’ breeding and wintering grounds, and will facilitate communication between Georgian and Ecuadorian communities. In Ecuador, partners will help to expand the Guayllabamba Protected Forest by another 34,500 acres, develop a management plan for it and the 15,000-acre Maquipucuna Protected Forest, and write guidelines for the establishment of a 37,000-acre protected forest at Comuna Río Santiago. Partners also will work with local farmers to plant bird-friendly tree species in 100 acres of coffee fields, and will seek bird-friendly certification for 250 acres of shade-grown coffee and 2,000 acres of shade-grown cacao. Additionally, partners will map regional priority-conservation areas based on bird distribution and diversity, deforestation, and land use.
Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas—ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, PARAGUAY, URUGUAY
Project: Ecotoxicology of Neotropical Migrant Shorebirds.
Location: Central and northeastern Kansas; south-central Nebraska; west-central Oklahoma; and central-coastal Texas; Argentina’s Laguna Mar Chiquita and Corrientes; Brazil’s Parque Nacional da Lagoa do Peixe and Pelotas; Paraguay’s Conçepcion and Asunción Bay; and Uruguay’s Laguna de Rocha and Cerros de Vera.
Congressional District: Kansas’ 1 and 2; Nebraska’s 3; Oklahoma’s 3; and Texas’ 14 and 22.
Grantee: Kansas State University.
Contact: Brett Sandercock, (785) 532-0120, bsanderc@ksu.edu.
Partners: Texas Tech University, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $74,243.
Matching Funds: $224,309.
Nonmatching Funds: $138,527.
BCR: 11, 18, 19, 22, and 37.
Ecoregion: NA0701, NA0803, NA0805, NA0807, NA0815, NT0210, NT0708, and NT0710.
Organophosphorus and carbamate are widely used agricultural pesticides that can cause respiratory failure, disrupt digestive efficiency and thermoregulation, and alter spatial orientation in birds, but there are few data on the subject. Partners will use their $74,243 grant, $224,309 in partner funds, and $138,527 in nonmatching funds to assess how exposure to these chemicals on breeding and wintering grounds may be contributing to the continued decline of some shorebird populations. Partners will sample a mix of upland- and wetland-associated species of conservation concern, including American golden plover, greater yellowlegs, and buff-breasted, upland, pectoral, and white-rumped sandpipers. Sampling will be conducted at six stopover sites in the Central Flyway states of Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas and at eight nonbreeding sites in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Partners’ efforts support the goals of Partners in Flight and U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan.
Missouri—MEXICO
Project: Migratory Bird Conservation Alliance.
Location: Missouri’s St. Louis County; Mexican States of Tamaulipas and Quintana Roo.
Congressional District: Missouri’s 3.
Grantee: American Bird Conservancy.
Contact: Jane Fitzgerald, (314) 918-8505, jfitzgerald@abcbirds.org.
Partners: Amigos de Sian Ka'an, Missouri Department of Conservation, Central Hardwoods Joint Venture, Mexico’s Natural Protected Areas Commission (CONANP), University of Missouri-Columbia, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, University of Texas-Brownsville, Autonomous University of Tamaulipas, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Bird Studies Canada, and Point Reyes Bird Observatory.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $50,000.
Matching Funds: $750,317.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 24, 48, and 56.
Ecoregion: NA0303, NA0404, NA1307, NT0176, NT0181, NT0235 and NT1421.
The forested and coastal habitats of Tamaulipas and Quintana Roo, Mexico, regularly serve as stopover and wintering sites for more than 220 neotropical migratory bird species, 29 of which are considered a conservation priority in the U.S. Central Hardwoods Joint Venture region. Partners will use their $50,000 grant and $750,317 in partner funds to develop a Migratory Bird Conservation Alliance, strengthening and coordinating efforts in avian monitoring, outreach and education, training, and habitat conservation among the three locales. Partners will measure a host of biological and behavioral characteristics for bird species in the project areas, and use the data, in part, to enhance breeding- and wintering-range maps. Partners will engage community members and students in bird identification, monitoring, or other awareness-increasing activities, and will create researcher-exchange opportunities between the two countries.
Puerto Rico—BAHAMAS, BELIZE, COSTA RICA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, HAITI, HONDURAS, JAMAICA, LESSER ANTILLES, NICARAGUA, PANAMA, TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
Project: Building a Baseline Foundation for Conserving Important Bird Areas.
Location: Portions of Central America and the Caribbean.
Grantee: Birdlife International-Americas Division.
Contact: Ian Davidson, [593] (2) 245-364, ian.davidson@birdlife.org.ec.
Partners: BirdLife-Ecuador, BirdLife-United Kingdom, and Conservation International.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $125,000.
Matching Funds: $616,170.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: All throughout Central America and the Caribbean.
The most prevalent and prominent threat to the hundreds of bird species that migrate through or wintering in Central America and the Caribbean is habitat fragmentation. No mechanism has been established in this region to prioritize site-specific conservation efforts for the birds’ benefit. Partners will use their $125,000 grant and $616,170 in matching funds to investigate and document the occurrence and abundance of priority migratory birds within up to 700 existing and potential Important Bird Areas in the region. They will use this information together with data on other priority birds, protection statuses, and site threats to systematically identify the highest-priority sites and initiate conservation actions. Partners also will establish and manage an Internet portal for sharing project information with more than 100 local participants and stakeholders, akin to the one successfully developed by the grantee for another project in the Tropical Andes region; manage data and map sites in the grantee’s World Bird Database; and develop a directory of the top 20 site action projects.

Latin American and Caribbean Projects

ARGENTINA
Project: Strategies for Managing an Internationally Important Wetland.
Location: Bahía Samborombón, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Grantee: Argentina Wildlife Foundation (FVSA).
Contact: Javier Corchera, [54] 11-4-331-3631 extension 23, director@vidasilvestre.org.ar.
Partners: None.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $48,800.
Matching Funds: $203,556.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0803.
The nearly 244,000-hectare (602,937-acre) Samborombón Bay, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance, hosts 63 percent of the shorebirds and trans-hemispheric waterbirds arriving in Argentina via the Atlantic corridor, including some 30,000 wintering common terns. With local cooperation, the grantee will use its $48,800 grant and $203,556 in matching funds to create an advisory council for the management of the bay, incorporate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s “Shorebird Sister Schools Program" into the Samborombón Bay community, and develop a press campaign and produce public outreach materials emphasizing the importance of the bay and migratory birds. Research and monitoring will be conducted on migratory birds and habitat in the project area, and pilot projects will be implemented that focus on tourism development and birdwatching. The grantee also will provide support for the development of the Punta Rasa Municipal Natural Reserve and take steps to validate the management plan.
ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, PARAGUAY, URUGUAY
Project: Creation of a Southern Cone Grasslands Joint Venture.
Location: Southeastern Paraguay; southern tip of Brazil; all of Uruguay; and north- and central-eastern Argentina.
Grantee: Aves Argentinas.
Contact: Andres Bosso, [54] 11-4-312-1015, bosso@avesargentinas.org.ar.
Partners: National Audubon Society, Birdlife Brazil Program, Guyra Paraguay, and Aves Uruguay.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $178,400.
Matching Funds: $1,082,900.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0710, NT0803, NT0806, and NT0909.
Some 70 percent of North America’s grassland bird species are in significant declines, primarily due to habitat threats on breeding and wintering grounds. Several species winter in the temperate Southern Cone Grasslands, a more than 1-million-square-kilometer (386,102-square-mile) ecoregion complex covering portions of four South American countries. Partners will use their $178,400 grant to advance the Southern Cone Grasslands Joint Venture—a regional partnership modeled after those under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. As leading members of this evolving joint venture, project partners will provide an ongoing forum to discuss grassland conservation issues among local authorities and various stakeholders; develop a business plan; and conduct outreach about the joint venture and grassland birds. They will train local leaders as needed to enable them to more fully participate in this effort, and will pilot several restoration and management activities. Occurrence and estimated abundance of neotropical migrants at Important Bird Areas will be documented, and a directory of 20 priority-site action projects will be developed. Partners, together with funding from the Global Environment Facility, are contributing $1,082,900 in matching funds towards this endeavor.
BELIZE
Project: Building the Constituency for Integrated Management of Key Migrant Habitat.
Location: Toledo District, Belize.
Grantee: Fauna & Flora International.
Contact: Evan Bowen-Jones, [44] (0)1223-579-469, evan.bowen-jones@fauna-flora.org.
Partners: Nando Peretti Foundation, Directorate General for International Cooperation-Dutch Government, United Nations Development Programme-Small Grants Programme, and World Land Trust.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $182,356.
Matching Funds: $575,037.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0154.
The 60,000-hectare (148,263-acre) Colombia River Forest Reserve is a key site for neotropical migratory birds; however, its forest-management practices need adjusting to ensure the long-term protection of its resources in the wake of Hurricane Iris—particularly since federally monitored, selective-harvest logging controls and reforestation requirements were lifted in the area to expedite salvage and clean-up efforts. Partners will use their $182,356 grant and $575,037 in matching funds to improve bird-habitat management in and around the forest reserve. Locally, they will expand existing outreach programs regarding bird-friendly agroforestry practices to additional communities—building a constituency for integrated forest management. Partners will research new agroforestry alternatives, and will develop community-managed research and monitoring programs on the bird and tree species in the reserve and adjacent Golden Stream Watershed. Nationally, partners will facilitate forest-management systems reform by contributing to the design of a pilot, government-endorsed model and policy on sustainable, community-based management strategies.
CAYMAN ISLANDS
Project: Caribbean Habitats - Forests Forever Reserve Consolidation.
Location: Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands.
Grantee: Cayman Islands Department of the Environment.
Contact: Mat Cottam, [1-345] 949-8469, Mat.Cottam@gov.ky.
Partners: National Trust for the Cayman Islands and a private landowner.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $244,000.
Matching Funds: $732,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0208.
Caribbean dry forest, historically exploited for timber and depleted through land clearance, is a severely threatened habitat type, and one that is vital to neotropical migratory birds, especially the endangered, endemic Cayman Brac parrot. The Cayman Islands are still fortunate to retain significant portions of this habitat, but rapid development is spurring the need for its long-term protection. As part of the Forests Forever fundraising and habitat-acquisition campaign, partners will use their $244,000 grant and $722,810 in matching funds to purchase the 32.2-hectare (79.8-acre) strip of privately owned, Caribbean dry forest that currently divides the Brac Parrot Reserve on Cayman Brac, an island bluff. The acquisition will unite the reserve’s land into one, contiguous, 113.2-hectare (279.7-acre) protected area. To raise public awareness about the importance of Cayman Islands’ forests for neotropical migrants, partners will design and install interpretive signs in the reserve as well as design educational posters to distribute to local schools.
COLOMBIA
Project: Colombian Neotropical Migratory Bird Program.
Location: Colombia’s San Andres Island; Darién, Chocó; Santa Marta, Magdalena; Jardín, Antioquia; Serranía Yariguíes, Santander; Roncesvalles & El Paujil Bird Reserve, Tolima/Boyacá; Munchique, Cauca; Pangan Bird Reserve, Nariño; and Caparú Biological Station, Vaupés.
Grantee: Conservation International.
Contact: Paul Salaman, [57] (1) 345-2852, p.salaman@conservation.org.
Partners: ProAves Colombia and Conservation International-Colombia.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $160,191.
Matching Funds: $1,959,085.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: Twenty-one throughout Colombia.
Habitats important to the 173 neotropical migratory bird species that funnel through Colombia annually are directly threatened by exploitation and destruction. Partners will use their $160,191 grant and $1,959,085 in matching funds to launch phase two of their project, building on the accomplishments of phase one. They will acquire 1,200 hectares (2,965 acres) for a Cerulean Warbler Bird Reserve at Serranía de Yariguíes and will develop an online reporting and analysis program. Partners also will implement their Action Plan, protecting another 26,700 hectares (65,977 acres) through land acquisition and management agreements at six sites and restoring 3,700 of those hectares (9,143 acres) as “Critical Areas” for birds. Partner funds will support a $1 million endowment for the long-term management of 40,000 hectares (98,842 acres) of previously acquired, crucial bird habitat. Partners will expand and strengthen the National Banding System and will work with regional governmental agencies on enforcing bird protection. Community-education activities will include forming 100 “Amigo de las Aves” student groups and expanding the National Migratory Bird Festival Day campaign.
COSTA RICA
Project: Acquisition and Reforestation of Agricultural Land in Northeastern Costa Rica.
Location: Province of Heredia, Costa Rica.
Grantee: Tirimbina Rainforest Center, Inc. (USA).
Contact: Nathan Kraucunas, (414) 278-6992, natek@mpm.edu.
Partners: Milwaukee Public Museum.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $21,200.
Matching Funds: $65,625.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0129.
The Tirimbina Rainforest Reserve protects some 340 hectares (840 acres) of rare, tropical premontane wet forest and the Sarapiquí River watershed, benefiting more than 300 species of resident and migratory birds in the area. Partners will use their $21,200 grant and $65,625 in matching funds to acquire an 18.7-hectare (46.2-acre) parcel of land on the reserve’s northern border that had been converted to agricultural use but is now for sale by the private owner for inclusion in the reserve. Adding this parcel will create a continuous flow of protected habitat from the partners’ Rojas Forest land (purchased as part of their previous grant) and the river. The land will be reforested and restored to mid-elevation tropical rainforest habitat. Partners also will collect baseline data for migratory and resident bird species on the property and will conduct environmental education in the local community.
Project: Capacity Building for Restoration and Management of Wetlands in Central America.
Location: Palo Verde National Park, Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica.
Grantee: Organization for Tropical Studies.
Contact: Jorge A. Jiménez Ramón, (506) 524-0607, jjimenez@ots.ac.cr.
Partners: AVINA Foundation, Costa Rica-United States of America Foundation for Cooperation, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Ministry of the Environment, local ranchers, University of Costa Rica’s Center for Environmental Contamination Research, Costa Rica Technological Institute, and National Water, Irrigation, and Drainage Service.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $119,581.
Matching Funds: $358,752.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0209.
The Tempisque River watershed contains some 100,000 hectares (247,105 acres) of wetlands habitats, nearly 40 percent of which has been drained for rice and sugar cane cultivation. Extensive pesticide use has resulted in the contamination of water sources in the area and a decline in some fish and other wetland-associated species’ populations. The Palo Verde National Park, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance, is located in this watershed. Partners will use their $119,581 grant and $358,752 in matching funds to train 40 Central American professionals in the maintenance, control, protection, and restoration of wetlands, using the park as a case study. Such skills in habitat conservation will enable them, in turn, to make significant contributions to the conservation and management of neotropical migratory birds. Partners also will restore 200 hectares (494 acres) of degraded wetlands to a combination of open water and both floating and stable vegetation attractive to migratory birds.
GUATEMALA
Project: Conservation of Neotropical Migratory Birds in the Sierra de Chamá, Phase II.
Location: Alta Verapaz, Guatemala.
Grantee: Proeval-Raxmu.
Contact: David Unger, [00-502] 7952-2530, proeco@itelgua.com.
Partners: GEO Stiftung für den Regenwald e.V., Fondo Tierra, National Forest Institute (INAB), PRBO Conservation Science, and Museum of Natural History-Vienna.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $98,160.
Matching Funds: $332,337.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0303, NT0154, and NT0112.
The 800-square-kilometer (309-square-mile) Sierra de Chamá contains both tropical and cloud forests and supports 95 species of migratory birds and 336 resident species. Seven are globally threatened, including resplendent quetzal and golden-cheeked warbler. Sierra de Chamá forest cover is diminishing due to forest fires, unsustainable agricultural practices, and a lack of protection incentives. Building on their project’s phase-one accomplishments, partners will use their $98,160 grant and $332,337 in matching funds to assist three local communities in attaining titles to some 14,000 hectares (34,595 acres) of their forest land to secure its protection. Community forest-management plans will be established on another 1,875 hectares (4,633 acres). Partners will restore 275 hectares (680 acres) of bird habitat by working with communities to plant, manage, and harvest fruit-tree plots and to implement fire-free agroforestry practices. Partners also will include cloud forest habitat in their biomonitoring program, and produce their first report on the birds in the area, covering some 40 species—20 of which are neotropical migrants.
JAMAICA
Project: An Economic Incentive to Maintain Shade-coffee Habitat near Protected Forests.
Location: Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park, Jamaica.
Grantee: Humboldt State University.
Contact: Matthew Johnson, (707)826-3218, mdj6@humboldt.edu.
Partners: University of West Indies, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Scholar Program, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $11,640.
Matching Funds: $36,473.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0303, NT0154, and NT0131.
Some 27 species of neotropical migratory birds are regularly recorded in and around Jamaica’s Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park, including species of conservation concern such as Bicknell’s thrush and prairie, worm-eating, and Swainson’s warblers. A growing number of coffee farmers adjacent to the park are abandoning their traditional, shade-grown crops for the quicker, sometimes greater, economic gains of full-sun crops. The resulting loss of a diverse tree canopy and intensified pesticide use on these farms are a threat to migratory bird populations. Partners will use their $11,640 grant plus $36,473 in matching funds and $68,000 in nonmatching funds to conduct experiments on six coffee farms along the park’s southern border to determine if insect-eating migratory birds are helping to control agricultural pests, particularly the coffee berry borer, in shade-grown crops. Partners also will identify economic incentives that would encourage coffee farmers to continue or return to shade-grown management practices. Findings will be shared with the farmers and other stakeholders.
MEXICO
Project: Ecological Reserves at Llano de La Soledad Ejidos.
Location: Municipality of Galeana, State of Nuevo León, Mexico.
Grantee: Pronatura Noreste, A.C.
Contact: Miguel Angel Cruz Nieto, [011] (52) (818) 345-1045 extension 24, mcruz@pronaturane.org.
Partners: The Nature Conservancy, Autonomous University of Nuevo León’s School of Biological Sciences, Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network, Secretariat of the Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), Nuevo León Agency for Environmental Protection and Natural Resources, and Producers’ Association of Southeast Coahuila.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $227,771.
Matching Funds: $873,550.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NA1303.
El Llano de la Soledad and associated prairie habitats consist of 25,000 hectares (61,776 acres) distributed among three ejidos and another 12,000 hectares (29,653 acres) belonging to six private ranches. A 10,500-hectare (25,947-acre) portion of El Llano de la Soledad is a designated State Natural Area for Ecological Conservation and supports more than 200 species of birds as well as colonies of the endangered Mexican prairie dog. Prairie habitats and wildlife are threatened in this region by agricultural encroachment and by the significant quantities of pesticides it brings. Partners will use their $227,771 grant and $873,550 in matching funds to work with ejidos in creating a 10,000-hectare (24,711-acre) corridor of prairie-habitat reserves across their lands. They also will acquire the grazing rights for 3,000 hectares (7,413 acres) of prairie habitat on ejidal lands within natural protected areas. The severity of pesticides present in populations of grassland birds also will be evaluated, and partners will propose recommendations for diminishing the pesticides’ impact on avian and human health.
Project: El Palmito: Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation in Sinaloa.
Location: Ejido El Palmito, Municipality of Concordia, State of Sinaloa, Mexico.
Grantee: Pronatura Noroeste, A.C.
Contact: Xicoténcatl Vega Picos, [011] (52) (667) 759-1653, xicovega@itesm.mx.
Partners: Ejido El Palmito, National Biodiversity Commission (CONABIO), Secretariat for the Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), Mazatlán Ecotours, Government of Sinaloa, National Forestry Commission (CONAFOR), Municipality of Concordia, Channel 3 Television (TV3), Monterrey Institute of Technology and Advanced Studies-Sinaloa Campus (ITESM), and Autonomous University of Sinaloa.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $247,318.
Matching Funds: $1,015,817.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 43.
Ecoregion: NA0302.
El Palmito is an extremely important bird area in Mexico, supporting more than 138 neotropical migratory species as well as the endemic tufted jay. Among the area’s many threats, logging is the most prominent. In October 2004, the 5,500-hectare (13,591-acre) area was declared a State Park, with the potential to become a National Park. Partners will use their $247,318 grant and $1,015,817 in matching funds to complete a conservation easement with the Ejido El Palmito that will prevent future logging and ensure habitat restoration in the area for the next 30 years. Partners, especially state and local agencies, will be promoting a series of alternative employment projects, such as ecotourism, designed to diversify and improve the local economy while protecting natural resources. Partners also will develop a geographic information systems database, create interpretative ecotourism trails in the area, establish a native-tree nursery program to support reforestation efforts, develop soil and hydrologic restoration programs, and conduct environmental education in the community.
Project: Establishment of a Migratory Bird Sanctuary.
Location: Municipality of Actopan, State of Veracruz, Mexico.
Grantee: Pronatura Veracruz, A.C.
Contact: Sofía Gómez Vallarta, [011] (52) (228) 818-6545, direccion@pronaturaveracruz.org.
Partners: Community Food and Health Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, Lannan Foundation, and two research and monitoring consultants.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $95,440.
Matching Funds: $358,752.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 49.
Ecoregion: NT0233.
Veracruz’s diverse coastal and higher-elevation habitats host large concentrations of migratory birds. Environmental threats in this region include habitat degradation, illegal hunting, endangered species capture and trade, and pesticide use. Partners will use their $95,440 grant and $286,895 in matching funds to build upon their accomplishments from a related project, in which they acquired and protected 6 hectares (15 acres) of mixed habitats and established a migratory bird observatory there. Partners now will involve the surrounding community in designating the area as a bird sanctuary. They will seek a Federal Maritime Terrestrial Zone concession for the area and the establishment of a federally permitted productive management unit (UMA) for the sustainable use or harvest of resources on the property. Partners also will expand the protected bird sanctuary by securing conservation easements on at least 200 hectares (494 acres) of willing neighbors’ lands. To promote dry-forest reforestation efforts, a native tree nursery will be started. Trails will be built to enhance environmental education activities and ecotourism. Partners also will develop a structured monitoring program for birds and insects.
Project: Linking Mexico’s Key Regions and Sites for Neotropical Migratory Birds of Conservation Concern.
Location: Nationwide.
Grantee: National Biodiversity Commission (CONABIO).
Contact: Humberto Berlanga, [011] (52) (555) 528-9176, hberlang@xolo.conabio.gob.mx.
Partners: National Audubon Society (U.S.), Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and National University of México.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $70,000.
Matching Funds: $480,520.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: Nationwide.
Ecoregion: Nationwide.
Mexico supports some 80 percent of the 361 bird species classified as neotropical migrants. Information on the biology and ecology of neotropical migratory birds in Mexico is fragmented, and data on their status and distribution throughout the country is housed among various institutions. This situation makes it more challenging to devise management actions that conserve populations and habitats. Partners will use their $70,000 grant and $480,520 in matching funds to update and compile the available information on bird species of conservation concern in Mexico. They also will make the results widely available to interested parties throughout North America to improve conservation planning and actions at the local, regional, and continental scale. Partners also will document the occurrence and status of these species within Mexico’s Important Bird Areas and other protected areas and will propose specific conservation actions. This data will be available through partners’ Websites as a resource to all stakeholders.
Project: Migratory Bird Habitat Conservation for the Calakmul Region.
Location: Municipality of Calakmul, State of Campeche, Mexico.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy.
Contact: Marie-Claire Paiz, [011] (52) (999) 920-2003, mcpaiz@tnc.org.
Partners: None.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $220,000.
Matching Funds: $769,625.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 56.
Ecoregion: NT0181.
The 728,434-hectare (1,800,000-acre) Calakmul Biosphere Reserve represents the heart of the Maya Forest. In recent years, settlement pressure has resulted in the increased conversion of this tropical forest land to agriculture, ranching, roads, and tourism development. The reserve hosts more than 350 species of birds, 127 of which are neotropical migrants. The grantee will use its $220,000 grant and $769,625 in matching funds to establish a 149,734-hectare (370,000-acre) Core Conservation Zone in the reserve and set the basis for its long-term management, with local assistance from Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatán and Tropica Rural Latinoamericana. Conhuas, a community situated between the biosphere reserve and the Balam Ku State Reserve, will be integrated into habitat protection programs. Ninety percent of Conhuas’ 58,679 hectares (145,000 acres) is still under forest cover, making this community an integral part of any long-term bird-habitat conservation efforts in the region. Community forest-owners and government officials also will be trained in ecologically sustainable forest-management practices.
Project: Upper San Pedro River Basin Habitat Conservation.
Location: San Pedro River Basin, State of Sonora, Mexico.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy.
Contact: Susan Anderson, (520) 622-3861, susan_anderson@tnc.org.
Partners: None.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $250,000.
Matching Funds: $750,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
BCR: 34.
Ecoregion: NA1303.
The San Pedro River basin straddles the United States-Mexico border and was once a vast, unbroken expanse of native grasslands with vibrant riparian corridors and isolated wetlands. Although urbanization and agricultural and ranching activities have dramatically degraded the river basin, it remains the source of critically important habitat for a diversity of birds, including 250 species of neotropical migrants. Within the basin lies Rancho Los Fresnos, 4,047-hectare (10,000-acre) private ranch containing one of the most important desert marshes found in the binational watershed. The grantee will use its $250,000 grant and $750,000 in matching funds to acquire and permanently protect 950 hectares (2,348 acres) of the ranch property. Title to the land will be held by Naturalia, who will jointly manage it with another nongovernmental organization, Biodiversity and Harmonious Development (BiDA), and the grantee. Management practices will abate erosion and encourage riparian- and grassland-habitat restoration.
NEOTROPICAL REGION
Project: Increase Information Sharing about Neotropical Migratory Bird Species Conservation Efforts.
Location: Neotropics-wide.
Grantee: Rainforest Alliance.
Contact: Diane Jukofsky, (506) 236-4721, infotrop@racsa.co.cr.
Partners: Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, Inter-American Development Bank, Overbrook Foundation, and Summit Foundation.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $25,275.
Matching Funds: $76,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: All throughout United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean.
Eco-Index is a Web-based almanac of conservation projects in Latin America and the Caribbean. It promotes improved communication and conservation by making succinct information about projects and the organizations involved in them easily available in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. First launched in 2001 with 65 projects in the database, Eco-Index now houses data on more than 700 projects and receives some 30,000 visits per month. The grantee will use its $25,275 grant and $87,000 in matching funds to update the 44 projects funded by various U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service grants programs already in the Eco-Index database and to add new ones. All Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act grant recipients from 2004 will be contacted and their projects’ profiles added to the database; at least two project directors will be interviewed. The grantee will create a templated Web page for participating recipients without one, and will seek to increase the public’s understanding of tropical biodiversity issues through the Eco-Exchange/Ambien Tema newsletter and the Eco-Index site itself.
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
Project: Reforestation and Hydrologic Rehabilitation of Nariva Swamp Ramsar Site.
Location: East-central coast of Trinidad & Tobago.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Contact: Montserrat Carbonell, [1] (901) 758-3788, mcarbonell@ducks.org.
Partners: Government of Trinidad & Tobago.
Funding Approved: April 2005.
Grant: $66,151.
Matching Funds: $198,453.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Ecoregion: NT0231 and NT1436.
The 6,234-hectare (15,405-acre) Nariva Swamp, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance, is the largest, coastal, freshwater wetland in Trinidad & Tobago and has the most varied vegetation of all wetlands there. Human activities have modified not only the region’s landscape but Nariva Swamp’s hydrology as well. After several years of multifaceted and multi-institutional negotiations, planning, and raising of public awareness, the stage is finally set for conducting on-the-ground actions to restore this critical wetland. Partners will use their $66,151 grant and $198,000 in matching funds to assemble a team of hydrologists, engineers, ecologists, foresters, and members of a newly established, community nongovernmental organization to reforest 1,000 hectares (2,471 acres) in areas previously clear-cut and to rehabilitate the hydrology on 2,500 hectares (6,178 acres). Partners also will address several fire-management issues, and fortify volunteer firefighters with adequate equipment. Their efforts will benefit the many neotropical migratory bird species that stopover or winter on this wetland.
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