A total of $23.5 million in funding was approved for the following 26 projects on September 13, 2006. Project partners are contributing $56 million in matching funds and $73.5 million in nonmatching funds to affect 209,541 acres of habitat. These projects are considered part of the Fiscal Year 2007/Window 1 grants cycle. This information is accurate as of the date of approval. For further information about specific grant projects, please contact the grantee listed in individual project summaries. Project Summary Table.

ARKANSAS, LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI
Project: Lower Mississippi Valley Ecosystem IV.
Location: In Arkansas: Arkansas, Clay, Craighead, Crittenden, Cross, Greene, Independence, Jackson, Lawrence, Lee, Lonoke, Mississippi, Monroe, Phillips, Poinsett, Prairie, Randolph, St. Francis, Woodruff, Pulaski, White, Ashley, Chicot, Desha, Drew, Jefferson, and Lincoln Counties; In Louisiana: East Carroll, Tensas, Madison, Morehouse, Ouachita, West Carroll, Franklin, Concordia, Rapides, Avoyelles, Caldwell, Catahoula, Grant, and LaSalle Parishes; In Mississippi: DeSoto, Tate, Grenada, Panola, Tallahatchie, Bolivar, Coahoma, Holmes, Humphreys, Issaquena, Leflore, Quitman, Sharkey, Sunflower, Tunica, Warren, Washington, Yazoo, Adams, and Wilkinson Counties.
Congressional District: 1, 2, and 4, Arkansas; 4 and 5, Louisiana; and 1, 2, and 3, Mississippi.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Contact: Jerry Holden, (318) 340-1020, jholden@ducks.org.
Partners: Wetlands America Trust, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, Private Landowner, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant:
$1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,302,615.
Nonmatching Funds: $140,000.
Joint Venture Region: Lower Mississippi Valley.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 26.
In this the fourth phase of their project, partners will continue to build upon their previous achievements in the landscape-scale protection, restoration, and enhancement of the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley's wetland ecosystem. Project partners will protect in perpetuity 1,400 acres of palustrine forested wetlands through the donations of conservation easements by three private landowners in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Partners also will restore 5,346 acres of wetlands and enhance 8,492 acres on a mix of private and public lands in the three states, including on Louisiana’s Bouef and Bayou Macon Wildlife Management Areas. A total of 15,238 acres of wetland habitats will be affected in the project area, with multiple conservation activities occurring on 1,970 of those acres. The conservation-easement tract in Arkansas is located close enough to the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge and Dagmar Wildlife Management Area to be in range of the ivory-billed woodpecker recently rediscovered there—thought to be extinct for the last 60 years. Other protected tracts in the project area are within the known range of the Louisiana black bear. Restoration and enhancement activities on 10,698 acres of federal land are complementing project partners’ efforts in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley.
CALIFORNIA
Project: Coastal Marin Wetlands Restoration Project I.
Location: Marin County, California.
Congressional District: 6.
Grantee: Point Reyes National Seashore Association.
Contact: Gary Knoblock, (415) 663-1835, garyk@ptreyes.org.
Partners: Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, California Coastal Conservancy, California Department of Fish and Game, Marin Community Foundation, Marin County Community Development Agency, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, Bella Vista Foundation, Point Reyes National Seashore, and Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $999,007.
Matching Funds: $2,213,367.
Nonmatching Funds: $88,000.
Joint Venture Regions: San Francisco Bay.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 32.
The diverse coastal landscape of Marin County includes the internationally recognized Tomales Bay and Bolinas Lagoon, as well as birdwatching hotspot Point Reyes National Seashore. While the landscape hosts significant numbers of wildlife species, its potential to support more is hampered by the obstruction or fragmentation of several, vital freshwater-marine confluences and wildlife corridors. Project partners will restore 754 acres, including tidal saltmarsh, brackish marsh, intertidal mudflat, seasonally and permanently flooded freshwater-emergent and forested-emergent marsh, and riparian and upland habitats. Restoration activities will include removing levees, impoundments, and a retaining wall to help reestablish the area’s natural hydrologic conditions; removing cattle from sensitive areas; excavating accumulated sediment in the waterways; and replacing invasive plant species with native ones. Partners’ efforts will benefit a rich community of at least 60 species of wetland-associated migratory waterfowl and shorebirds and riparian-associated landbirds, as well as endangered anadromous fish. Restricted growth in western Marin County will serve to ensure the long-term success of partners’ restoration efforts here.
Project: South San Francisco Bay Wetlands Restoration Project.
Location: Alameda, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties, California.
Congressional District: 13, 14, and 15.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Contact: Mark Biddlecomb, (916) 852-2000, mbiddlecomb@ducks.org.
Partners: Wildlife Conservation Board, Resources Legacy Fund, Santa Clara Valley Water District, California Coastal Conservancy, Save the Bay, Pacific Gas and Electric, and Center for Venture Philanthropy.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $5,040,090.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Regions: San Francisco Bay.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 32.
The San Francisco Bay Estuary is the Nation’s second largest estuary and perhaps the most biologically significant one on the Pacific Coast. Over the past century, however, some 85 to 90 percent of its wetlands have been altered or filled for other land uses. Project partners will focus their restoration efforts in the South San Francisco Bay, also known as South Bay, where commercial salt production encompasses nearly the entire shoreline, inflicting devastating effects particularly on the bay’s tidal marshes. In 2003, one company sold 15,100 acres of its salt ponds, or two-thirds of its operation, to the State; a conservation strategy for restoring the ponds to their natural condition has been underway ever since. In this project, partners are restoring a total of 11,585 of the State-owned acres, 1,133 acres of which are also being enhanced. Restoration activities include reestablishing tidal hydrology and connectivity between the breached ponds and the adjacent tidal sloughs and open bay. To enhance the project area, partners will replace deteriorated, nonfunctional water-control structures on ponds to be managed for many species of migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, and waterbirds.
IOWA
Project: Cedar - Wapsi Valley Wetlands.
Location: Mitchell, Howard, Floyd, Chickasaw, Butler, Bremer, Black Hawk, Buchanan, Delaware, Benton, Linn, Jones, Cedar, Clinton, Scott, and Muscatine Counties, Iowa.
Congressional District: 1, 2, 3, and 4.
Grantee: Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
Contact: Todd Bishop, (515) 281-7127, Todd.Bishop@dnr.state.ia.us.
Partners: Mitchell County Conservation Board, Junior Rahn, Clinton County Conservation Board, Bremer County Conservation Board, Howard County Conservation Board, Matthew McQuillen, Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Pheasants Forever-Twin Rivers Chapter, Pheasants Forever-Iowa Council , Pheasants Forever-Mitchell County Chapter, National Wild Turkey Federation, Waterfowl USA-Scott County Chapter, Pheasants Forever-Scott County Chapter, Whitetails Unlimited-Bremer County Chapter, Pheasants Forever-Clinton County Chapter, Whitetails Unlimited-Wapsi Bottoms Chapter, Clinton County Conservation Foundation, Pheasants Forever-Northern Prairie Chapter-Worth County, Pheasants Forever-Winnebago/Hancock Chapter, Nelle Stegge Trust, Quad Cities Conservation Alliance, Waterfowl USA-Mississippi Flyway Chapter, The Nature Conservancy, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,049,799.
Nonmatching Funds: $662,558.
Joint Venture Region: Upper Mississippi River-Great Lakes.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR:  22.
The Cedar and Wapsipinicon Rivers are considered to be among the best remaining examples of major interior rivers in the entire Upper Mississippi River Basin. The Wapsipinicon River is designated a “Protected Water Area” for its scenic and natural qualities. Both rivers are characterized by broad floodplains containing little development, consisting instead of extensive series of old oxbows, channel off-chutes, and other forested wetlands. However, the majority of the floodplains’ palustrine emergent wetlands has been either filled or drained. Through a combination of fee-title acquisition and donation, project partners will protect a total of 2,037 acres of the wetlands. Although not part of this project’s funding, partners plan to restore these acres as needed, as well. Project lands will be owned by either the State or a county conservation board and managed as wildlife management areas. These areas will be open to the public for hunting, hiking, birdwatching, and other recreational and educational activities. Partners’ efforts will not only benefit the many bird species for which the Cedar-Wapsi Valley is a major migration corridor, but also the economies of local communities that rely on the natural resources of the rivers.
LOUISIANA, TEXAS
Project: Chenier Plain Coastal Wetlands Conservation V.
Location: Vermilion Parish, Louisiana; and Orange County, Texas.
Congressional District: 7, Louisiana; and 8, Texas.
Grantee: The Conservation Fund.
Contact: Julie Shackelford, (512) 477-1712, jkshackelford@sbcglobal.net.
Partners: BP Amoco.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $3,005,040.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Gulf Coast.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 37.
In southeast Texas, forested wetlands are experiencing land fragmentation caused by urban and suburban expansion and short-term rotational timber harvest. In this the fifth phase of their project, partners will build upon their previous conservation accomplishments within Texas’ Chenier Plain ecosystem by permanently protecting an addition 1,151 acres of freshwater marsh and forested cypress/tupelo wetland habitat. The 1,151-acre Neches Tract being acquired by The Conservation Fund is located along the Neches River and is the first sizeable forest available to migratory birds after crossing the Gulf of Mexico in the spring. This tract will be donated to the National Park Service for inclusion in its Big Thicket National Preserve, benefiting large numbers of migrating landbirds, waterfowl, and waterbirds, as well as many other wildlife species. In Louisiana, a portion of the value of the 71,130-acre White Lake Preserve, previously donated to the State for conservation, is being offered as match. The preserve contains bald cypress/tupelo habitat and open coastal wetlands. Activities in both states help to minimize habitat fragmentation, improve water quality, and provide recreational opportunities for the public.
MAINE
Project: Greater Pleasant Bay Project Area II.
Location: Washington County, Maine.
Congressional District: 1.
Grantee: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Gulf of Maine Coastal Program.
Contact: Lois Winter, (207) 781-8364, lois_winter@fws.gov.
Partners: Maine Coast Heritage Trust, Robert Stillman, Great Auk Land Trust, Beryl Harper, Snapp/Denniston, Robert Graves, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, and The Nature Conservancy.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $950,000.
Matching Funds: $1,937,000.
Nonmatching Funds: $5,000.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 14.
High biological productivity, extensive intertidal mudflats, and a relatively pristine shoreline are part of what makes Greater Pleasant Bay’s habitat so outstanding for hosting large concentrations of wintering and migrating waterfowl and shorebirds. In this project’s first phase, Maine Wetlands Protection Coalition (Coalition) partners acquired and permanently protected all or part of five islands and four mainland properties in the bay. The Coalition is a diverse, public-private partnership established in 1989 to support the goals of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan in Maine. In this second phase, Coalition project partners will build upon and complement their previous accomplishments by permanently protecting another 676 acres of ecologically valuable wetlands and adjacent upland habitat within Greater Pleasant Bay. Project lands will be protected through a combination of acquisition and donation of fee title and easements. In addition to benefiting numerous species of migratory birds and other wildlife, partners’ efforts will ensure public access to the project area’s coastal wetlands and adjacent uplands for low-impact, recreational and educational uses (except, of course, at critical times during certain wildlife species’ lifecycles).
Project: Kennebec Estuary, Phase II.
Location: Sagadahoc and Lincoln Counties, Maine.
Congressional District: 1.
Grantee: Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.
Contact: Ken Elowe, (207) 287-5252, ken.elowe@state.me.us.
Partners: The Nature Conservancy, Lower Kennebec Regional Land Trust, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Friends of Merrymeeting Bay, Maine Coast Heritage Trust, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Town of Topsham, Maine Department of Conservation-Natural Areas Program.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,249,100.
Nonmatching Funds: $5,000.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 14.
The Kennebec Estuary is the largest tidal estuary on the East Coast north of the Chesapeake Bay and contains one of the Nation’s largest intact systems of saltwater, freshwater, and brackish tidal marshes. It is comprised of Merrymeeting Bay and the Lower Kennebec River, which, together, is a focus area of the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture. In Phase I of this project, Maine Wetlands Protection Coalition partners protected a total of 5,375 acres of wetlands and associated uplands in this area for the benefit of migratory waterfowl and other birds, endangered and threatened species, and diadromous fish. The Coalition is a diverse, public-private partnership established in 1989 to support the goals of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan in Maine; the Kennebec Estuary is of highest priority for the Coalition. In this the second phase, Coalition project partners will permanently protect 631 acres of habitat through a combination of fee acquisition and donation. Project lands will be open to the public for recreational and educational uses that are compatible with wildlife needs; they will be restricted, however, during critical times in certain species’ lifecycles.
MARYLAND
Project: Pocomoke River Conservation Partnership I.
Location: Wicomico and Worcester Counties, Maryland.
Congressional District: 1.
Grantee: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Chesapeake Bay Field Office.
Contact: Dan Murphy, (410) 573-4521, dan_murphy@fws.gov.
Partners: Maryland Department of Natural Resources, The Nature Conservancy-Maryland/District of Columbia Chapter, Sweetbay Watershed Conservation, and Worcester County.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $648,727.
Matching Funds: $1,448,849.
Nonmatching Funds: $1,320.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
The Pocomoke River originates in Delaware, flows through Maryland, and into the Chesapeake Bay at Tangier Sound. The river’s entire watershed is a biodiversity hotspot, supporting many a rare, threatened, or endangered plant or wildlife species. The watershed’s forested wetlands provide important stopover and nesting habitat for migratory birds, particularly Neotropical species. The beds of submerged aquatic vegetation at Tangier Sound—among the best remaining ones in Maryland—are an extremely important food source to American black duck and other waterfowl. One of the greatest threats to this resource, however, is runoff from surrounding agricultural and residential lands, which elevates the bay’s nutrient load to fatal levels. Project partners will acquire permanent conservation easements on three private properties (the West, Burns, and Zimmer Tracts) totaling 1,188 acres within the Pocomoke watershed. The State will hold and monitor the easements. Partners also will reconnect a channelized, bermed, 2.5-mile section of the river with its floodplain, restoring wetland functions to 655 of the protected acres. Partners’ protection and restoration actions are vital to safeguarding the health of important waterfowl habitats downstream.
MASSACHUSETTS
Project: Buzzards Bay Watershed: Dike Creek.
Location: Bristol County, Massachusetts.
Congressional District: 4.
Grantee: The Coalition for Buzzards Bay.
Contact: Mark Rasmussen, (508) 999-6363, rasmussen@savebuzzardsbay.org.
Partners: The Trustees of Reservations, Westport Land Conservation Trust, Town of Westport Conservation Commission, Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Bristol County Mosquito Control, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, and Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $1,887,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
Dike Creek is part of the larger Buzzards Bay Watershed, which contains habitat critical to waterfowl and wetland-associated migratory birds. In April 2003, the bay suffered a 100,000-gallon oil spill, contaminating its water column, sediment, and 93 miles of shoreline habitats such as mud flats, salt marshes, sandy beaches, and rocky shores. Nearly 500 waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds died, including state- and federally endangered roseate terns. The spill polluted habitat and resources also important to the state- and federally endangered piping plover. The wetland habitats that partners in this project will permanently protect along Dike Creek will continue to help filter pollutants, aiding the bay in its oil-spill recovery. Protecting these wetlands also safeguards them against conversion to residential development—another primary threat to the area’s habitats and wildlife. Partners will acquire easements on three tracts totaling 199 acres; acquire fee title on a 39-acre tract; and receive a fee-title donation on a 14-acre tract. Additionally, partners will restore 15 acres of salt marsh at Meadow Shores, adjacent to Buzzards Bay. In total, 267 acres of habitat will be protected or restored.
Project: Buzzards Bay Watershed: Inner Bay Restoration & Edmunds.
Location: Plymouth and Barnstable Counties, Massachusetts.
Congressional District: 4 and 10.
Grantee: The Coalition for Buzzards Bay.
Contact: Mark Rasmussen, (508) 999-6363, rasmussen@savebuzzardsbay.org.
Partners: Wareham Land Trust, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Town of Wareham, Town of Mattapoisett, Massachusetts Wetlands Restoration Program, Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program, and USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $800,000.
Matching Funds: $1,606,960.
Nonmatching Funds: $233,751.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
This project’s eight sites are within the larger Buzzards Bay Watershed, which contains habitat critical to 221 species of wetland-associated migratory birds. In April 2003, the bay suffered a 100,000-gallon oil spill, contaminating its water column, sediment, and 93 miles of shoreline habitats such as mud flats, salt marshes, sandy beaches, and rocky shores. Nearly 500 waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds died, including state- and federally endangered roseate terns. The spill polluted habitat and resources also important to the state- and federally endangered piping plover. Project partners will acquire four private parcels totaling 102 acres, permanently protecting a mix of freshwater wetlands, uplands, and 1 mile of riparian habitat in the bay’s watershed. Wareham Land Trust will hold title to acquired lands. Partners also will restore a total of 90 acres of degraded salt marsh habitat at Sippewisset Marsh, Crooked River Marsh, Eel Pond, and Back River Marsh. All project lands will allow public access for recreational and educational uses. By protecting or restoring a total of 192 acres of wetland habitats, partners are helping to safeguard the bay from conversion to residential development and aiding in its post-spill recovery.
Project: Buzzards Bay Watershed: Slocum's River.
Location: Bristol County, Massachusetts.
Congressional District: 4.
Grantee: The Coalition for Buzzards Bay.
Contact: Mark Rasmussen, (508) 999-6363, rasmussen@savebuzzardsbay.org.
Partners: Koch family (landowners), Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program, and Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $300,000.
Matching Funds: $1,200,000.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
Slocum’s River is within the larger Buzzards Bay Watershed, which contains habitat critical to 221 species of wetland-associated migratory birds. In April 2003, the bay suffered a 100,000-gallon oil spill, contaminating its water column, sediment, and 93 miles of shoreline habitats. Nearly 500 waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds died, including state- and federally endangered roseate terns. The spill polluted habitat and resources also important to the state- and federally endangered piping plover. More than 900 protected acres along Slocum’s River provide a diversity of intact, coastal habitats for migratory birds and other wildlife. Project partners will acquire a conservation easement on the Koch Family’s 86-acre property—the only remaining unprotected parcel on the river’s west bank. Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust (Trust) will hold the easement. Last year, the neighboring Knight Family donated a conservation easement on their 7-acre parcel to the Trust. By protecting this total of 93 acres of wetlands and associated habitats in the Buzzard Bay Watershed, partners are helping to further safeguard the area from conversion to residential development and aiding in the bay’s post-spill recovery.
MINNESOTA
Project: Border Prairie Wetlands.
Location: Becker, Douglas, Kandiyohi, Mahnomen, Meeker, Otter Tail, Pope, Stearns, and Todd Counties, Minnesota.
Congressional District: 6 and 7.
Grantee: Pheasants Forever, Inc.
Contact: Matt Holland, (320) 354-4377, ringneck@tds.net.
Partners: John Lindquist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Independence Tube Corporation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,034,043.
Nonmatching Funds: $188,302.
Joint Venture Region: Prairie Pothole.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 11.
Prairie and wetland habitats in Minnesota and elsewhere are important to an array of species, yet are under intense pressure to be developed or converted to other land uses, such as agriculture. Project partners are acquiring an 837-acre parcel in fee title and enhancing 50 of its grassland acres. They also will acquire a perpetual conservation easement on another 270-acre parcel and restore 100 acres of its cropland back to grassland. Some 33 acres of habitat on additional partner lands will be restored; 768 acres more will be enhanced. Project activities concentrate on lands containing drained or existing palustrine emergent wetlands, shallow lake habitats, and associated prairie uplands. Nonmatching funds will support the acquisition of a conservation easement on an additional 223 acres in the project area, as well as the restoration of another 151 acres of habitat. In total, project partners are positively affecting 2,282 acres of wetland and associated prairie habitats. State and federal project lands will be open for public uses that are compatible with long-term conservation.
Project: Minnesota Headwaters I.
Location: Cass, Crow Wing, Morrison, Mille Lacs, Itasca, and Aitkin Counties, Minnesota.
Congressional District: 8.
Grantee: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Contact: Leslie Tannahill, (651) 259-5242, leslie.tannahill@dnr.state.mn.us.
Partners: Minnesota Federation of Field Trial Clubs, Minnesota Legislative Commission on Minnesota Resources, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., The Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land, Friends of Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, Independence Tube Corporation, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Parker Township, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,876,732.
Nonmatching Funds: $40,000.
Joint Venture Region: Upper Mississippi River/Great Lakes.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 12 and 23.
The North American Waterfowl Management Plan’s Upper Mississippi River/Great Lakes Joint Venture is endeavoring to protect and restore an additional 12,000 acres of habitat within the Minnesota portion of its boundaries. This project will help to advance 5,119 acres of that goal, thanks to the timely conservation opportunities that now exist within the counties involved. Project partners will focus on safeguarding emergent and forested wetlands, associated uplands, and shoreline habitats—all threatened by the rapidly increasing development of seasonal and permanent homes in the project area. Partners will protect 324 acres through fee-title acquisition and another 458 acres through the acquisition or donation of conservation easements. Nonmatching funds will support the fee-title acquisition of 26 acres more. Partners also will restore 715 acres and enhance another 3,596 acres of habitat. Their efforts in total will improve water quality and wildlife habitats, benefiting a wide range of species—especially migratory birds, which the State’s 2 million birdwatchers and three-quarter of a million hunters will enjoy.
MISSISSIPPI
Project: Malmaison Wildlife Management Area Forested Wetlands Enhancement.
Location: Bolivar, Coahoma, Grenada, Tallahatchie, and Quitman Counties, Mississippi.
Congressional District: 1 and 2.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Contact: Chris Cole, (601) 956-1936, ccole@ducks.org.
Partners: Wetlands America Trust, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, Bobo Brake, LLC, Old Rivers Farm of Mississippi, LLC, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $591,646.
Matching Funds: $1,184,386.
Nonmatching Funds: $232,695.
Joint Venture Region: Lower Mississippi Valley.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 26.
This project contributes towards partners’ long-term efforts to conserve critical wetland habitats in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The valley is one of the most important sites in North America for migratory birds, offering diverse wintering and migration habitats to continental populations of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other wetland-associated birds. The valley’s forested wetlands have been reduced tremendously, however, due to conversion to other land uses. Project partners are protecting a total of 1,129 acres of forested wetlands and associated habitats thanks to two private landowners’ donations of perpetual conservation easements on their properties, made to Wetlands America Trust. Partners also will enhance 1,030 acres of bottomland hardwoods and associated forested-wetland habitats on the State’s Malmaison Wildlife Management Area. Nonmatching funds will support efforts to restore hydrology and management capability on 243 acres of moist-soil wetlands at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Coldwater River National Wildlife Refuge. In total, project partners will conserve 2,402 acres of habitat within the valley for the long-term benefit of wildlife and people.
MISSOURI
Project: Lewis & Clark Floodplain Heritage Partnership III.
Location: St. Louis, St. Charles, Franklin, Ray, Lafayette, Linn, Livingston, Chariton, Cooper, Saline, Boone, Johnson, Holt, Atchison, and Moniteau Counties, Missouri.
Congressional District: 1, 2, 4, 6, and 9.
Grantee: Missouri Department of Conservation.
Contact: Brad Jacobs, (573) 522-4115 extension 3648, brad.jacobs@mdc.mo.gov.
Partners: Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Helen Wiese Estate (Missouri Department of Conservation), Wilke Land Company, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Missouri Conservation Heritage Foundation, Marais Temps Clair Hunting Club, Conservation Employees Credit Union, Conservation Federation of Missouri, Massasagua Flats Duck Club, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $4,696,150.
Nonmatching Funds: $598,700.
Joint Venture Region: Upper Mississippi River/Great Lakes.
Flyway: Mississippi.
BCR: 22.
In this the third and final phase of their project, partners will build on their previous achievements by conserving another 3,315 acres of habitat in total along the lower Missouri River and its major tributaries. Partners will protect in perpetuity 1,007 acres of palustrine emergent and forested wetlands in the Marais Temps Clair Conservation Area through the donation of conservation easements on three surrounding private lands. Nonmatching funds will support the fee-title acquisition of 176 acres of habitat to be added to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Big Muddy National Wildlife Refuge. Additionally, enhancement activities such as levee renovation, spillway construction, and pump replacement will be carried out on a total of 2,132 acres on Wilke Land Company property and on the Fountain Grove Conservation Area, improving seasonal and forested wetlands at these two sites. Overall, partners’ efforts will help to safeguard the river’s wetland landscape, which historically has been a hotspot for migrating and nesting waterfowl and other bird species.
NORTH DAKOTA
Project: Chase Lake Area Wetland Project VII.
Location: McLean, Sheridan, Wells, Foster, Burleigh, Kidder, Stutsman, Logan, LaMoure, McIntosh, and Dickey Counties, North Dakota.
Congressional District: At large.
Grantee: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Contact: Kevin Willis, (701) 355-8533, kevin_willis@fws.gov.
Partners: North Dakota Game and Fish Department, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., North Dakota Natural Resources Trust, Orvin Ravnaas, Brent Fast, Gerard Wald, Owen Olson, Larry Schauer, Darrell Trautman, Larry Walth, Bruce Herr, Blair Bechtle, Richard Boschee, Dallas Bakken, Greg Hoskin, Doug Hertz, Michael Harris, and Private Landowners.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $1,005,043.
Nonmatching Funds: $110,312.
Joint Venture Region: Prairie Pothole.
Flyway: Central.
BCR: 11.
In this their seventh phase, project partners will build on the successes attained thus far in their ongoing efforts to conserve wetlands and grasslands in the Prairie Pothole Region using a multi-agency, landscape-level approach to conservation planning. Protecting wetlands is not enough when the surrounding prairie uplands continue to be converted to agricultural and other uses, which reduces and/or fragments migratory bird habitat as well as introduces agricultural runoff. Project partners have developed conservation models that consider the entire wetland/grassland complex and directly link habitat objectives to waterfowl population goals. In this project, partners will acquire conservation easements on 6,265 acres and leases on another 24,932 acres. Additionally, 225 acres of habitat will be restored and 11,776 more acres will be enhanced. Partners also will create 59 wetland acres. In total, partners will positively affect 43,257 acres of wetland and upland habitats on a mix of public and private lands for the benefit of migratory birds. Publicly owned project lands will be open for low-impact recreational uses; privately owned ones, at the discretion of each landowner.
Project: Missouri Coteau Habitat Conservation Project V.
Location: Burke, Divide, Williams, Mountrail, Ward, McLean, McHenry, Sheridan, Wells, Burleigh, Foster, Stutsman, Kidder, Emmons, Logan, LaMoure, McIntosh, and Dickey Counties, North Dakota.
Congressional District: At large.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.-Great Plains Regional Office.
Contact: Randy Renner, (701) 355-3526, rrenner@ducks.org.
Partners: North Dakota Game and Fish Department and U.S Fish and Wildlife Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $1,004,489.
Nonmatching Funds: $122,200.
Joint Venture Region: Prairie Pothole.
Flyway: Central.
BCR: 11.
This project marks the fifth phase of an ongoing effort to conserve wetland and grassland communities using a landscape-level approach. Project partners are using landscape models to directly link habitat objectives to bird population goals established by the North American Waterfowl Management Plan’s Prairie Pothole Joint Venture. Protecting wetland-associated grasslands is a critical means of achieving not only the joint venture’s waterfowl population goals for this region, but also its goals for landbirds, waterbirds, and shorebirds. Most of the remaining grassland habitats in the Missouri Coteau are native prairie and only a fraction are protected. Project partners will work with the many willing private landowners in the project area to acquire perpetual conservation easements on their grassland—13,332 acres in total, to which U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold the easements. Partners will acquire leases on 8,083 additional acres of grasslands from other willing private landowners; the State will hold the leases. In total, project partners are protecting 21,415 grassland acres, improving the quality of the region’s resources for migratory birds as well as people.
Project: North Dakota Drift Prairie Project I.
Location: Wells, Eddy, Foster, Griggs, Steele, Trail, Stutsman, Barnes, Cass, LaMoure, Ransom, Dickey, Sargent, Richland, Towner, Cavalier, Pembina, Benson, Ramsey, Walsh, Nelson, and Grand Forks Counties, North Dakota.
Congressional District: At large.
Grantee: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Contact: Kevin Willis, (701) 355-8526, kevin_willis@fws.gov.
Partners: North Dakota Game and Fish Department, North Dakota Natural Resources Trust, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Delta Waterfowl Foundation, Crosslands, Inc., Richard Vasicek, Roger Kenner, Terry Shaffer, Dennis and Shelly Nelson, Travis Anderson, Mitch Roney, and David Freund.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $1,001,593.
Nonmatching Funds: $97,180.
Joint Venture Region: Prairie Pothole.
Flyway: Central.
BCR: 11.
In the Drift Prairie Coteau, a subregion of the Prairie Pothole Region, approximately 75 percent of the landscape is cultivated cropland; less than 7 percent remains in grass cover suitable for waterfowl and other upland-nesting migratory birds. The ensuing habitat fragmentation has led to increased success by nest predators, negatively impacting bird populations. Project partners are using landscape-based population modeling to directly link habitat objectives to the waterfowl population goals established by the Prairie Pothole Joint Venture for the region at large. To that end, partners will work with willing private landowners to acquire fee title to 158 acres of land, conservation easements on another 3,344 acres, and leases on 17,083 acres more. Additionally, partners will restore 575 acres of habitat and enhance another 2,678 acres, plus create 64 wetland acres. Focusing their grassland-conservation efforts in high wetland-density areas is also an efficient way for partners to help maintain the long-term integrity of more of the landscape’s wetlands. In total, project partners are positively affecting 23,902 acres of wetlands and associated upland habitats.
OREGON
Project: Lake County Closed Basin Project II.
Location: Lake County, Oregon.
Congressional District: 2.
Grantee: Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
Contact: Michael Shannon, (541) 884-3449, mshannon@ducks.org.
Partners: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Goose Lake Fishes Working Group, Bagley Ditch Corp, Willow Springs Guest Ranch, J-Spear Ranch, ZX Ranch, O’Leary Ranch, and Murphy Ranch.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,145,493.
Nonmatching Funds: None.
Joint Venture Region: Intermountain West.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 9.
This project is the second phase of a long-term effort to conserve migratory bird habitat within the Closed Basin Focus Area of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan’s Intermountain West Joint Venture. This focus area is characterized by large, closed watersheds often containing extensive marsh systems, which offer diverse habitats to migratory birds and other wildlife. Project partners will build upon their previous accomplishments in this focus area by conserving a total of 6,365 more acres of habitat on a mix of public and private lands in the Goose Lake, Summer Lake, Chewaucan, and Warner Basins. Partners will be restoring a total of 2,520 acres of wetlands and associated habitats, as well as enhancing another 3,845 acres by, in part, removing interior levees and water-control structures. Additionally, although not counted towards the total acreage in this current phase, partners will further enhance 1,200 acres of the palustrine emergent wetlands they restored in Phase 1 on U.S. Bureau of Land Management-owned property. Public project lands will be open for recreational uses, with the potential for additional public access on some private lands as well.
Project: Upper Klamath Lakes Wetlands.
Location: Klamath County, Oregon.
Congressional District: 2.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy.
Contact: Mark Stern, (503) 802-8100, mstern@tnc.org.
Partners: Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, PacifiCorp, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Trust for Public Lands, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Klamath Tribes, and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,100,000.
Nonmatching Funds: $13,738,033.
Joint Venture Region: Intermountain West.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 9.
Over 70 percent, or 35,000 acres, of the wetlands around Upper Klamath Lake have been diked and converted to other land uses, leading to a significant loss of habitat for dozens of migratory bird species, two endangered sucker fish, and other wildlife. This project, which will positively affect a total of 9,853 wetland acres, is part of a long-term, comprehensive strategy that partners are implementing to restore these lake-fringe wetlands. Using both matching and nonmatching funds, partners will restore 4,219 acres of wetlands on the Tulana Tract within the protected Williamson River Delta. Project partners’ nonmatching funds supported the recent acquisition of conservation easements on the 370-acre Redband Ranch Tract, west of Upper Klamath Lake, and on the 2,155-acre Goose Bay Tract within the delta; partners will use both matching and nonmatching funds to also enhance the entire latter tract. Nonmatching funds will support the fee-title acquisition of the 2,820-acre Barnes Tract as well as restoration on another 289 acres of wetlands in the project area.
RHODE ISLAND
Project: Buzzards Bay Watershed: Tiverton Great Swamp.
Location: Newport County, Rhode Island.
Congressional District: 1.
Grantee: The Coalition for Buzzards Bay.
Contact: Mark Rasmussen, (508) 999-6363, rasmussen@savebuzzardsbay.org.
Partners: Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management’s Open Space Bond Program, Rhode Island Agricultural Land Preservation Commission, The Nature Conservancy-Rhode Island Chapter, Lucien LeBreux (landowner), USDA-NRCS’ Farm & Ranchland Protection Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s SNE/NYB Coastal Ecosystems Program, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences, Eastern Rhode Island Conservation District, and Westport River Watershed Association.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $300,000.
Matching Funds: $1,115,374.
Nonmatching Funds: $384,626.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
Buzzards Bay encompasses Massachusetts’ southern coastline from western Cape Cod to Rhode Island, and its watershed supports 221 species of wetland-associated migratory birds. In April 2003, the bay suffered a 100,000-gallon oil spill, contaminating its water column, sediment, and 93 miles of shoreline habitats. Nearly 500 waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds died, including state- and federally endangered roseate terns. The spill polluted habitat and resources also important to the state- and federally endangered piping plover. Tiverton Great Swamp is a 400-acre freshwater wetland located within the Rhode Island portion of the bay’s watershed. Project partners will acquire a conservation easement on 150 acres of Mr. LeBreaux’s farmland, which contains wetland habitats associated with Tiverton Great Swamp and an access road to the swamp’s core area. A deed to the development rights on the farm’s remaining 80 acres will also be acquired, limiting its use to agriculture. By protecting a total of 230 acres of wetlands and associated habitats in Buzzard Bay Watershed, partners are helping to safeguard the area from conversion to residential development and aiding in the bay’s post-spill recovery.
SOUTH CAROLINA
Project: Pee Dee River Conservation Initiative: Woodbury Tract.
Location: Marion County, South Carolina.
Congressional District: 6.
Grantee: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources-Heritage Trust Program.
Contact: Emily Cope, (803) 734-3937, CopeE@dnr.sc.gov.
Partners: South Carolina Conservation Bank, The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Forest Service-Forest Legacy Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and The Conservation Fund.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,100,000.
Nonmatching Funds: $25,100,000.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 27.
Project partners will acquire and protect the 25,668-acre Woodbury Tract, co-located within the Winyah Bay Focus Area of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan’s Atlantic Coast Joint Venture and the South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative (SAMBI) Project Area. The tract’s owner, International Paper Corporation, recently decided to sell the property, which contains 27.5 miles of frontage along the Great Pee Dee River and 11.5 miles along the Little Pee Dee River—both are State Scenic Rivers and popular recreation sites. It also sits upstream from and adjacent to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. In addition to their Act grant, project partners are using matching and nonmatching funds to acquire the property at the seller’s bargain price before it is otherwise sold to the highest bidder on the open market. Their timely partnering and action means the permanent protection of 19,712 acres of wetlands and 5,956 acres of upland habitats within a landscape of great importance to migratory birds and other wildlife. The property will be State-owned and incorporated into the Wildlife Management Area Program for public use and enjoyment.
Project: Savannah River Conservation Initiative: Hamilton Ridge Tract.
Location: Hampton County, South Carolina.
Congressional District: 2.
Grantee: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources-Heritage Trust Program.
Contact: Emily Cope, (803) 734-3937, CopeE@dnr.sc.gov.
Partners: South Carolina Conservation Bank, The Conservation Fund, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Recovery Land Acquisition Program, The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Forest Service-Forest Legacy Program, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Coastal Estuarine and Land Conservation Program.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,100,000.
Nonmatching Funds: $20,100,000.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 27.
In addition to their Act grant, project partners will use both matching and nonmatching funds to acquire and protect the 13,281-acre Hamilton Ridge Tract, which contains 8.5 miles of frontage along the Savannah River and is located within the South Lowcountry Focus Area of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan’s Atlantic Coast Joint Venture. The owner of the tract, International Paper Corporation, recently decided to offer the property at a bargain price to project partners. Thanks to their timely collaboration and action, this land will be permanently protected as wildlife habitat instead of being sold to the highest bidder on the open market. The property, which will be owned by the State, is adjacent to a combined 12,600 acres of already protected habitat—the State’s Webb and Palachucola Wildlife Management Areas. The project property also contains 6,584 acres of wetlands and 6,697 acres of upland habitat, primarily loblolly pine, and will be incorporated into the State’s Wildlife Management Area Program for public recreational uses.
VIRGINIA
Project: Southern Tip Cooperative Conservation Initiative.
Location: Northampton, Virginia.
Congressional District: 2.
Grantee: The Nature Conservancy.
Contact: Rick Jorgensen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, (413) 253-8581, rick_jorgensen@fws.gov.
Partners: Thomas O’Connor, OC&H, LLC, Brickhouse Neck, LLC, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $3,102,464.
Nonmatching Funds: $11,031,536.
Joint Venture Region: Atlantic Coast.
Flyway: Atlantic.
BCR: 30.
The Southern Tip of the Delmarva Peninsula contains tidal and non-tidal wetlands and associated buffer habitats that offer vital resources to migrating and nesting waterfowl, shorebirds, and other wetland-associated birds. Project partners will conserve a total of 1,872 acres of habitat for the long-term benefit of migratory birds and other wildlife. The privately owned 496-acre Bull Tract, adjacent to the State’s Mockhorn Wildlife Management Area, will be acquired and protected using partners’ matching and nonmatching funds, in addition to their Act grant. The coastal, privately owned, 82-acre Dixon Tract across from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge will be protected through fee-title donation. Several private landowners further north will donate conservation easements on a total of 1,294 acres to The Nature Conservancy. Also, some 146 acres will be restored and another 233 acres enhanced on project properties. Partners’ efforts will help to improve water quality, encourage ecotourism, and enhance recreational opportunities on public lands.
WASHINGTON
Project: Lower Yakima Wetlands Protection / Restoration II.
Location: Yakima County, Washington.
Congressional District: 4.
Grantee: Yakama Nation.
Contact: Tracy Hames, (509) 865-5121, tracyhames@yakama.com.
Partners: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pheasants Forever, Inc., City of Grandview, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Yakima Basin Environmental Education, Yakima Valley Audubon Society, Washington Waterfowl Association, Central Washington University, Lloyd Sak, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,575,979.
Nonmatching Funds: $625,416.
Joint Venture Region: Intermountain West.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 9.
In this the project’s second phase, partners will protect, restore, and enhance a total of 14,652 acres of native floodplain habitats in the Yakima River Basin. Many of the basin’s unique watersheds have been degraded by various other land uses. Partners have acquired and will permanently protect a 320-acre parcel along Satus Creek, as well as restore the property’s hydrology. Additional restoration activities will occur throughout the project area, improving a total of 14,199 acres of habitat on a mix of federal, state, and Yakama Nation lands. Some 133 acres more will be enhanced. Partners’ efforts will focus on all or part of the following State- or Yakima Nation-owned Wildlife Areas: Satus, Sunnyside Headquarters Unit, Sulphur Creek, Byron Ponds/Grandview Wastewater Treatment Facility, Meninick, Old Goldendale Road, Toppenish Creek Pumphouse, Lower Satus Creek, and Mid-Toppenish Creek. Some areas are also part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge. Conserving the Yakima River Basin’s habitats helps to safeguard native plants and animals traditionally valuable to the Yakama Nation, and enhances recreational opportunities on their and public lands.
Project: North Willapa Bay Wetlands Conservation.
Location: Pacific County, Washington.
Congressional District: 3.
Grantee: Cascade Land Conservancy.
Contact: Mark Johnsen, (206) 224-8020, MJohnsen@karrtuttle.com.
Partners: Wildlife Forever Fund, Tagney Jones Family Fund, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Department of Agriculture, and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Approved: September 2006.
Grant: $1,000,000.
Matching Funds: $2,070,500.
Nonmatching Funds: $49,000.
Joint Venture Region: Pacific Coast.
Flyway: Pacific.
BCR: 5.
Willapa Bay is considered one of the most pristine estuaries in the United States; its associated rivers, sloughs, and shorelines provide internationally significant and critical habitat to migratory waterfowl and shorebirds. In the northern portion of the bay, much of the highly important emergent salt marshes, mudflats, sloughs, and forested wetlands are on privately owned lands, which face an increasing amount of pressure from development, resource extraction, and other uses. Through fee-title acquisition, project partners will protect a total of 1,391 acres of wetlands and associated uplands in perpetuity. Protecting the six parcels involved will help to link and combine previous conservation efforts and secure more wintering and breeding habitat for migratory birds. Partners also will restore 725 acres of wetlands in the bay by removing dikes and eradicating/controlling an invasive smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora. In total, partners’ efforts will conserve 2,116 acres wetland-associated habitats within Willapa Bay for the benefit of wildlife and people.
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