Georgia Ecological Services Field Offices
Southeast Region
Map of the Southeast Region

Federally Threatened and Endangered Plants found in Georgia

Listed Plants GA
Range
Habitat Threats
Threatened Species - likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future
Pool Sprite, Little Amphianthus

Amphianthus pusillus
Little Amphianthus
Granite outcrops in Georgia Piedmont
Shallow pools on granite outcrops, where water collects after a rain. Pools are less than 1 foot deep and rock rimmed.

More Information

Quarrying that destroys granite outcrops is the major threat. Other threats include vehicle traffic, littering, fire building, vandalism, and cattle eutrophication/trampling on outcrops. 

5 Year Review

Swamp pink

Helonias bullata
Swamp Pink
Rabun County

Coldwater seepage swamps of the Blue Ridge (mountain bogs) with red maple, tag alder, purple pitcherplant, mountain laurel, and rosebay rhododendron

More Information

Loss of wetlands to urban and agricultural development, timbering operations, overcollecting, human trampling, and habitat degradation caused by off-site disturbance (such as water withdrawal for irrigation, sewage treatment discharge, increased siltation, and excess nutrients or chemicals in water)
Small whorled pogonia
Link to Picture
Isotria medeoloides
Northeast Georgia mountain areas
Partially shaded gaps in mixed deciduous-conifer woods with open understory and sparse herbaceous layer.

More Information
Habitat loss and overutilization for scientific and private collections
Mohr's Barbara's-buttons
Link to Picture
Marshallia mohrii
Northwest Georgia
Prairie-like grass-sedge communities over seasonally wet sandy clays; also margins of shale-bedded streams

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Agricultural development, routine maintenance of roadside rights-of-way (including herbicide treatment, bulldozing, planting nonnative competitive grasses, and mowing before flowering), silvicultural practices, and road expansion
Kral's water-plantain
Kral's Water Plantain
Sagittaria secundifolia
Chattooga County
Submerged in sandstone crevices and shoals or shallow pools in rapidly flowing streams; often found with riverweed (Podostemon)

More information

Water quality degradation and increased stream turbidity; eutrophication that increases levels of filamentous algae; off road vehicle traffic in streams; and possibly low genetic variability
Large-flowered skullcap
Link to Picture
Scutellaria montana
Northwest Georgia
Mature oak-pine forests with sparse understory

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Logging, wildfires, livestock grazing, residential development, and small populations coupled with limited distribution
Virginia spiraea
Link to Picture
Spiraea virginiana
Dade and Walker County
Streams on gravel bars, rocky ledges and bouldery rubble periodically flushed by high water

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Reservoir construction, highway maintenance and construction, insect damage, little or no seedling production, and low genetic diversity

Endangered Species -
A species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
Hairy rattleweed
Link to Picture
Baptisia arachnifera
Brantley and Wayne County
Sandy soils in open pine flatwoods, intensively managed slash pine plantations, and along road and powerline right-of-ways

More Information
Clearcutting of pines for timber, followed by intensive site preparation (chopping and bedding with heavy machinery)
Smooth coneflower
Link to Picture
Echinacea laevigata
Northeast Georgia
Meadows and open woodlands on basic or circumneutral soils; often with eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) and button snakeroot (Eryngium yuccifolium)

More Information
Plant collecting, residential and industrial development, encroachment of woody vegetation, highway construction and improvement, and certain types of roadside and powerline right-of-way maintenance
Black-spored quillwort

Isoetes melanospora

Granite outcrops in western half of Georgia's Piedmont
Shallow pools on granite outcrops, where water collects after a rain. Pools are less than 1 foot deep and rock rimmed.

More Information

Quarrying that destroys granite outcrops is the major threat. Other threats include vehicle traffic, littering, fire building, vandalism, and cattle eutrophication/trampling on outcrops. Genetic integrity is threatened due to hybridization with I. piedmontana.

5 Year Review

Mat-forming quillwort
 
Isoetes tegetiformans
Mat-forming Qullwort
Granite outcrops in eastern half of Georgia's Piedmont
Shallow pools on granite outcrops, where water collects after a rain. Pools are less than 1 foot deep and rock rimmed. 

More Information

Quarrying that destroys granite outcrops is the major threat. Other threats include vehicle traffic, littering, fire building, vandalism, and cattle eutrophication/trampling on outcrops.

5 Year Review

Pondberry

Lindera melissifolia
Pondberry
Baker, Chatham, Screven, and Wheeler County
Shallow depression ponds of sandhills, margins of cypress ponds, wet pine savannas, and in seasonally wet low areas among bottomland hardwoods

More Information
Drainage ditching and subsequent conversion of habitat to other uses; domestic hogs, cattle grazing, and timber harvesting; and apparent lack of seedling production 
Canby's dropwort
Link to Picture
Oxypolis canbyi
Coastal plain
Peaty muck of shallow cypress ponds, wet pine savannahs, and adjacent sloughs and drainage ditches

More Information
Loss or alteration of wetland habitats
Harperella
Link to Picture
Ptilimnium nodosum
Dooly, Greene, and Schley County
Seeps on granite outcrops in the Piedmont; wet savannahs, ditches, and peaty fringes of pineland pools and cypress ponds in the Coastal Plain

More Information
 

Michaux's sumac

Rhus michauxii
Michaux's Sumac

Piedmont region
Sandy or rocky open woods, usually on ridges with a disturbance history (periodic fire, prior agricultural use, maintained right-of-ways), and xeric woods, often over ultramafic geology

More Information
Low reproductive capability (dioecious), low genetic variability associated with geographic isolation, hybridization with R. copallina and R. glabra, and habitat loss due to development

Green pitcher plant

Sarracenia oreophila
Green Pitcher Plant

only extant population in Towns County, historic population in Bibb County
Open seepy meadows, along sandy flushed banks of streams, and in partially shaded red maple-blackgum low woods or poorly drained oak-pine flatwoods

More Information
Collection for commercial sale; fire suppression; and increased residential, agricultural, and silvicultural development
American Chaff-seed
Link to Picture
Schwalbea americana
Coastal Plain and Fall Line
Fire-maintained wet savannahs in the Coastal Plain (with grass pinks, colic root, huckleberry and gallberry); grassy openings and swales of relict longleaf pine woods in the Piedmont

More Information
Fire suppression, habitat conversion, and incompatible agriculture and forestry practices
Fringed campion

Silene polypetala
Fringed Campion
Coastal Plain and Fall Line
Mature hardwood or hardwood-pine forests on river bluffs, small stream terraces, moist slopes and well-shaded ridge crests. Rich woods with other flowers. Found over limestone in Coastal Plain and over biotite/amphibolite geology in Fall Line

More Information
Residential development, logging, and spread of Japanese honeysuckle
Cooley's meadowrue
Link to Picture
Thalictrum cooleyi
Worth County
Fine sandy loam in open, seasonally wet mixed pine-hardwoods and in adjacent wet savannahs; in Georgia, may be restricted to roadsides and powerline right-of-ways

More Information

Most extirpated populations were eliminated by fire suppression and/or silvicultural or agricultural development. 

5 Year Review - 2008

Florida torreya
Link to Picture
Torreya taxifolia
Decatur County
Beech-magnolia forests and mixed hardwoods on middle slopes of steep ravines with nearly permanent seepage (steepheads)

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A disease (first observed in late 1950's that killed all mature trees) that kills needles and stems, causing defoliation and tree death
Persistent trillium
Link to Picture
Trillium persistens
Habersham, Rabun, and Stephens County
Either in mixed pine-hemlock-hardwood forests (growing with Viola hastata and Rhododendron maximum) or in mixed oak-beech forests; restricted to Tallulah-Tugaloo River system

More Information
Limited range and population size make the species vulnerable to any factor that reduces habitat or abundance. Clearcutting and collecting also are threats.
Relict trillium

Trillium reliquum
Relict Trillium
Coastal Plain and Fall Line
Hardwood forests; in the Piedmont, found in either in rich ravines or adjacent alluvial terraces with other spring-flowering herbs

More Information
Logging, road construction, agricultural conversion, mining, residential/industrial development, and encroachment by Japanese honeysuckle and kudzu
Tennessee yellow-eyed grass

Xyris tennesseensis
Tennessee Yellow-eyed Grass
Northwest Georgia
Gravelly open, calcareous, seepy margins and wet meadows along spring-fed headwater streams

More Information
Ditching, wetlands conversion. conversion of spring-seep habitat to farm ponds/eutrophication, competition with woddy shrubs and trees.

 

Other listed species' recovery plans are available here.

Recovery Plans on these pages are available as .PDF files. PDF files can be downloaded and read using free Adobe Acrobat Reader Adobe Acrobat logo

 

Last updated: November 16, 2012