Georgia Ecological Services Field Offices
Southeast Region
Map of the Southeast Region

Federally Threatened and Endangered Mammals found in Georgia

Listed Mammals Georgia Range Habitat Threats
Threatened Species - likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future - (no threated mammals in Georgia)
Endangered Species - A species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.

Right Whale
Northern Right Whale

Eubalaena glacialis

2010 Recovery Plan

Coast
MAP
Calve in shallow coastal waters from November to March (primarily January to March). Critical habitat designated from the shoreline out 5-15 nautical miles between approximately the mouth of the Altamaha River to Sebastian Inlet, Florida Initial decreases probably due to overharvesting. Slow population growth after exploitation halted may be due to collisions/disturbance associated with boats and barges, inbreeding, inherently low reproductive rates, or a reduction in population below a critical size for successful reproduction.

Humpback Whale
Humpback Whale

Megaptera novaeangliae

1991 Recovery Plan

 

Coast
MAP

Coastal waters during migration Entanglement in commercial fishing gear and collisions/disturbance associated with boats and barges
Gray Bat
Gray Bat
Myotis grisescens

Southwestern Appalachian, Ridge and Valley, and Western Blue Ridge physiographic provinces
MAP
Colonies restricted to caves or cave-like habitats; forage primarily over water along rivers or lake shores

Human disturbance and vandalism in caves, pesticides, flooding of caves by impoundments, and loss of insect prey over streams degraded by siltation and pollution

5 Year Review

Indiana Bat
Indiana Bat
Myotis sodalis
Southwestern Appalachian, Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, Talladega Upland, and the Southern Inner Piedmont physiographic provinces
MAP
Hibernate in caves; maternity colonies of 25-100 females are found in riparian and upland woods within hollow trees or limbs, under the bark of dead trees (such as red oaks) or under the bark of live trees (such as shagbark hickory); forage in riparian, upland, and floodplain areas

Human disturbance and vandalism in caves, deforestation and stream channelization, natural hazards such as cave flooding or cave-ins, and possibly insecticide poisoning

 

5 Year Review

West Indian Manatee
West Indian Manatee  

Trichechus manatus
 
2001 Recovery Plan
Coast
MAP
Coastal waters, estuaries, and warm water outfalls

Initial decreases probably due to overharvesting for meat, oil and leather. Current mortality due to collisions with boats and barges and from canal lock operations. Declines also related to coastal development and loss of suitable habitat, particularly destruction of seagrass beds.

5 Year Review - 2007

Other listed species' recovery plans are available here.

Recovery Plans on these pages are available as .PDF files. PDF files can be downloaded and read using free Adobe Acrobat Reader Adobe Acrobat logo

The list does not include the Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) and eastern cougar (Felis concolor couguar), which probably have been extirpated from Georgia.

The sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis) and fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) may be seen along the Georgia Coast during migration. The blue whale (Balaena musculus) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) live well offshore and normally are not seen in Georgia's coastal waters.

In addition, the state of Georgia has a list of 471 animal "species of concern".

 

Last updated: December 20, 2013