Georgia Ecological Services Field Offices
Southeast Region
Map of the Southeast Region

Federally Threatened and Endangered Reptiles and Amphibians found in Georgia

Listed Reptiles and Amphibians Georgia Range Habitat Threats
Threatened Species - likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future
Loggerhead sea turtle
Caretta caretta
2008 Recovery Plan

Coast
MAP
Nests on Georgia's barrier island beaches. Forages in warm ocean waters and river mouth channels worldwide. 

Loss of nesting beaches due to human encroachment, high natural predation, drownings when turtles trapped in fishing and shrimping trawls, and marine pollution

5 Year Review - 2007

Green sea turtle
Chelonia mydas
1998 Recovery Plan (for Pacific populations)

1991 Recovery Plan (for Atlantic populations)

Coast
MAP
Rarely nests in Georgia. Generally found in fairly shallow waters (except when migrating) inside reefs, bays and inlets. North American distribution is from Massachusetts to Mexico and from British Columbia to Baja California.

Exploitation for food, high levels of predation, loss of nesting habitat due to human encroachment, hatchling disorientation due to artificial lights on beaches, and drownings when trapped in fishing and shrimping nets

5 Year Review - 2007

Frosted Flatwoods salamander
Ambystoma cingulatum

Photo: John Jensen

Coastal Plain

MAP

Breeding habitat are isolated pond cypress dominated depressions often with a smaller component of blackgum or slash pine. These ponds are isolated within pine forests. Suitable wetlands have a marsh-like appearance with sedges and grasses growing throughout and other herbaceous species in the shallow water edges. A relatively open canopy resulting from seasonal prescribed burns is necessary to maintain appropriate vegetation, which serves as cover for salamander larvae and their aquatic invertebrate prey. Habitat destruction, deterioration, and fragmentation.
Eastern indigo snake

Drymarchon corais couperi

South Georgia
MAP
During winter, den in zeric sandridge habitat preferred by gopher tortoises; during warm months, forage in creek bottoms, upland forests, and agricultural fields

Habitat loss due to uses such as farming, construction, forestry, and pasture and to overcollecting for the pet trade

5 Year Review - 2007

Endangered Species - A species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
Reticulated Flatwoods salamander
Ambystoma bishopi

Photo: John Jensen

Coastal Plain

MAP

Breeding habitat are isolated pond cypress dominated depressions often with a smaller component of blackgum or slash pine. These ponds are isolated within pine forests. Suitable wetlands have a marsh-like appearance with sedges and grasses growing throughout and other herbaceous species in the shallow water edges. A relatively open canopy resulting from seasonal prescribed burns is necessary to maintain appropriate vegetation, which serves as cover for salamander larvae and their aquatic invertebrate prey. Habitat destruction, deterioration, and fragmentation.

Leatherback sea turtle
Dermochelys coriacea
1998 Recovery Plan (for Pacific populations)

1992 Recovery Plan (for U.S. Caribbean, Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico)

Coast
MAP
Rarely nests in Georgia. Visits often coincide with periodic abundance of cannonball jellyfish. Distributed worldwide in tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Most pelagic of the sea turtles.

Human exploitation, beach development, high predation on hatchlings, and drowning when caught in nets of commercial shrimp and fish trawls and longline and driftnet fisheries

5 Year Review - 2007

Hawksbill sea turtle
Eretmochelys imbricata
1998 Recovery Plan (for Pacific populations)

1993 Recovery Plan (for U.S. Caribbean, Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico)


Coast
MAP
Migrates through Georgia's coastal waters. Frequents rocky areas, reefs, shallow coastal areas, lagoons, and narrow creeks and passes. Distribution is in tropical and subtropical seas of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans

Primary causes of population decline are development and modification of nesting beaches and exploitation for the shell. Secondary causes include egg consumption, use of the skin for leather, and heavy predation of eggs and hatchlings.

5 Year Review - 2007

Kemp's ridley sea turtle

Lepidochelys kempi

2011 Recovery Plan

Coast
MAP
Outside of nesting season primarily found in the nearshore and inshore waters of the Gulf of Mexico, although immatures have been observed along the Atlantic as far north as Massachusetts. Next off Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Overharvesting of eggs and adults for food and skins and drowning when caught in shrimp nets

5 Year Review - 2007

 

Other listed species' recovery plans are available here.

Recovery Plans on these pages are available as .PDF files. PDF files can be downloaded and read using free Adobe Acrobat Reader Adobe Acrobat logo

The list does not include the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), which is threatened due to similarity of appearance to other Federally listed species.

In addition, the state of Georgia has a list of 471 animal "species of concern".

 

Last updated: November 16, 2012