Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge
Southeast Region
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Sea Turtle Nesting

Sea Turtle Nests by Year and Species
2001 - 2013

(Includes south Brevard County, Sebastian Inlet State Park, and north Indian River County)

 
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

Loggerhead

0 13,155

18,809

(record
year!)

11,841 14,468 10,374 11,410 7,902 10,828 11,085 9,138 12,598 14,209 15,645
Green

0

12,846

(record
year!)

3,419 6,023 4,479 1,332 3,138 4,490
1,609 3,638 982 670 2,970 198
Leatherback 4 49 51

77

(record
year!)

59 41 29 74
19 68 19 53 19 47
Kemps Ridley 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 


2010 Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

 
Loggerhead
Green
Leatherback
South Brevard County 12,233n /9,904fc 4,093n /5,847fc 34n /3fc
Sebastian Inlet State Park 702n /627fc 109n /310fc 9n/0fc
North Indian River County 1,533n /1,657fc 277n /609fc 16n/2fc
Total 14,468n 4,479n 59n
*Footnote: n=nest, fc=false crawl

 


2009 Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

 
Loggerhead

Green

Leatherback
South Brevard County 8,668n/8,170fc 1,184n/1,605fc 23n/4fc

Sebastian Inlet State Park

598n/424fc 52n/69fc 11n/0fc
North Indian River County 1,108n/1,136fc 96n/91fc 7n/0fc

 

Total Nests

 

10,374

 

1,332

 

41

Footnote: n=nests, fc=false crawl
Comments: Nest depredation for 2009 - 8 raccoons, 4 ghost crab, 70 coyotes

 


2008 Archie Carr N.W.R.
Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

Figures in red are false crawls.
 
Loggerhead
Green
Leatherback

South Brevard County
as of Oct 18

9502
7734
2772
3564
20
2

Sebastian Inlet
State Park
as of Sept 18

654
445
137
111
5
3
North Indian River
County
as of Sept 11
1252
986
214
202
4
0
Total 11,408
3,123
29

 

Daytime Nesting of a
Leatherback Sea Turtle
Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge
April 15, 2003

 


2007 Archie Carr N.W.R. Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

Figures in red are false crawls.
FINAL
Loggerhead
Green
Leatherback
South Brevard County 6,405
6,268
3,963
5,876
52
2
Sebastian Inlet
State Park
538
414
214
180
9
2
North Indian River
County
959
826
313
382
13
2
Total 7,902
7,508
4,490
6,438
74
6

n = nests; fc = false crawl

Leatherbacks:
New high record for leatherback sea turtles this year at 74 nests! Leatherbacks nested into July this year. Leatherbacks former high year was in 2005 with 68 nests in the Refuge.
Greens:
New high record for Greens this year at 4,490 nests. Previous high record in 2005 yeilded 3,638 nests in the Refuge.
Loggerheads:
Loggerhead sea turtle nesting is down this year.

 


2006 Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

Figures in red are false crawls.
 
Loggerhead
Green
Leatherback
South Brevard County 9,018
8,890
1,383
1,860
12
0
Sebastian Inlet
State Park
619
551
74
58
1
0
North Indian River
County
1,191
1,067
152
241
6
0
Total Nests 10,828
10,508
1,609
2,159
19
0

Noteworthy:
There was a green turtle nest laid north of the Refuge in the CBSA study site on 11 Nov. This may be the latest green turtle nest on record in Florida.

In South Brevard County:
Last leatherback nest on 19 June
Last Loggerhead nest on 16 September; last false crawl on 17 September
Last Green nest on 21 October; last false crawl on 9 November

 


2005 Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

Figures in red are false crawls.
  Loggerhead Green Leatherback
South Brevard County 8,854
12,935
3,117
6,093
43
6
Sebastian Inlet State Park 867
668
238
216
8
0
North Indian River County 1647
1,645
223
444
17
0
Total Nests 11,085 3,638 68

  • Loggerhead nesting - first nest April 24, last nest Sept 11, peak nesting, last week June
  • Green nesting - first nest June 4, last nest Oct 5, peak nesting last week July
  • Leatherback nesting - first nest March 21, last nest June 25, peak nesting 3rd week June

 

 

2004 Sea Turtle Nest Distribution

  Loggerhead Green Leatherback
South Brevard County 7557 791 12
Sebastian Inlet State Park 492 66 2
North Indian River County 1089 125 5
Total 9138 982 19

 

 

Some 2005 Photos

At the beginning of the summer, we had lots of rainfall and cloudy conditions on the beach, which seems tohave affected hatching because some nests were taking over 65 days to emerge. The average time for loggerhead turtles to emerge is 53-55 days. What's really interesting about these reptiles, is that once the weather cleared up and we experienced the usual hot "dog days" of Summer, we were able to see incubation and emerging time speed up to around 45 days.
Green Sea Turtle #05-1 Green Sea Turtle #05-2 Hatchling Turtle #05-1
Photos by: Jennifer Lorenzo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Click picture for an enlargement. Use the BACK button of your Browser to return.
Last updated: March 25, 2014
Southeast Region Fish & Wildlife Service | U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Home Page | Department of the Interior  | USA.gov  | About the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service  | Accessibility  | Privacy  | Notices  | Disclaimer  | FOIA
done.”

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Invites Public to Provide Input to Environmental Assessment to Review Use of Genetically Modified Crops


April 29, 2013

Rows of green crops in cracked soil

Row of corn crops. Photo: USFWS

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public input as it evaluates the future use of genetically modified crops on national wildlife refuges that use farming in the Southeast Region. These refuges use farming as a wildlife management tool to help meet refuge specific conservation objectives for waterfowl and other species. 

Genetically modified crops (GMCs, GM crops, or biotech crops) are plants that have had their DNA modified by using genetic engineering techniques to improve growth and resist pests and other harmful agents.  These crops have been used since their de-regulation by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in the mid 1990s. Since then, GMCs have become a widespread feature of American agriculture. 

The public is encouraged to review information or attend public meetings that will be held in June.  Comments will be considered and a determination will be made after addressing those comments and any new information that is accumulated during this environmental assessment.  The 90-day comment period will end on July 28, 2013.

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FWS online center for public information, updates, and involvement in the environmental assessment process
List of deregulated GMCs and GMCs under petition (on USDA.gov)

 


Fish and Wildlife Service Invites Public Comment on Spring Pygmy Sunfish Status, Critical Habitat Designation, and Draft Economic Analysis


April 26, 2013

A small greenish fish with small spots

A spring pygmy sunfish. Credit: Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Current evidence still suggests that the spring pygmy sunfish may become threatened with extinction in the foreseeable future.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has re-opened the comment period on the October 2, 2012, proposal to protect this sunfish under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and designate critical habitat, until May 29, 2013.  In addition, the public can also review and comment on the draft economic analysis estimating the potential fiscal impacts of the critical habitat designation.

The spring pygmy sunfish is a spring-associated fish which is currently only found in a single spring system (Beaverdam Spring/Creek) in the Tennessee River drainage in Limestone County, Alabama.  Historically, this sunfish was known to occur at two other sites in northern Alabama. The species’ decline has been attributed to water pollution, a reduction of water quantity, and impoundments.  Threats to the fish and its habitat include proposed urban and industrial development, increased groundwater and surface water usage, and excessive stormwater runoff containing pesticides, herbicides, and suspended sediment.

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Service Estimates Economic Impact of Critical Habitat Designation for Fluted Kidneyshell and Slabside Pearlymussel


April 26, 2013

A light and dark brown mussel in a river

Slabside pearlymussel. Photo: Brett Ostby

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of a draft economic analysis considering the impact of a proposal to designate critical habitat for two freshwater mussels proposed for listing as endangered. 

If the two species are listed, and if critical habitat is finalized as it is proposed, the draft economic analysis suggests a range of economic impacts that are possible as a result.

In addition to opening a public comment period on the draft economic analysis, the Service is re-opening a public comment period on the proposal to designate critical habitat for these mussels under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for 30 days by May 29, 2013, in order to allow comments on the draft analysis and the proposed critical habitat designation.  The Service first released the proposed critical habitat designation for public comment in October 2012. 

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Partners Starting Captive Breeding Program In Race Against Time to Prevent Extinction of Florida Grasshopper Sparrows


April 18, 2013

A banded Florida grasshopper sparrow sings from a branch

Florida grasshopper sparrow signing. Photo: © Christina Evans, Chroma Graphics Studios.

Vero Beach, Fla. -- In an effort to prevent extinction of the Florida grasshopper sparrow, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and many partners are establishing a captive breeding program for this species.  Many believe that if current population trends continue the species could go extinct in three to five years. 

The Rare Species Conservatory Foundation and the Service will be collaborative leaders of this captive breeding effort.

The captive breeding program will consist of trained volunteers and staff from the Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Department of Environmental Protection going into the field during April, May and June at specified locations looking for eggs in nests.  When and if eggs are found, some of them will be collected and taken to the Rare Species Conservatory Foundation in Loxahatchee, Fla.  There, they will be placed in incubators, where the hope is hatchlings will emerge in 11-13 days, after which around-the-clock care will be provided to facilitate their survival.  Ultimately, the hatchlings will be kept in captivity in the hopes that they will mate and breed.

“Captive breeding is labor intensive and challenging.  It is generally done as a last resort and there are no guarantees.  But we have to try,” said Larry Williams, the Service’s Florida State Supervisor of Ecological Services.  “This is an emergency and the situation for this species is dire.  This is literally a race against time.”

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To Sniff out Illegal Wildlife Trade: Follow their Noses


April 5, 2013

By Ed Grace, Deputy Chief of Law Enforcement

A man in USFWS law enforcement uniform walks a black lab around cardboard boxes on a conveyor belt

Wildlife Inspector Amir Lawal and his canine partner, Viper, check packages on a conveyor belt during training. Photo: Tom MacKenzie, USFWS.

Dogs never cease to amaze me – whether they are sniffing out bombs, providing eyes or extra hands for their partners, flushing out pheasant or retrieving waterfowl for hunters, or providing that 24-7 friendship only dogs can. I recently saw that our Southwest Region had used dogs trained to sniff out Jemez salamanders.

That’s why I am so excited to welcome the newest employees of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Wildlife Detector Dogs Viper, Butter, Lancer and Locket.

They are part of our latest effort to fight the rising international black market in endangered animal parts – a callous and brutal trade that drives its victims closer to extinction. Much of the illegal wildlife trade passes across U.S. borders and we do stop much of it.

In 2012 alone, we inspected more than 180,000 shipments of wildlife and wildlife products, and successfully executed one of the largest investigative operations ever mounted by the Service – Operation Crash – which broke a global rhino horn smuggling ring.

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2013 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Student Art Competition Winners


April 4, 2013

A male and female mallard set against a rich blue background

Best of Show artwork featuring a pair of mallards by Euna Oh. See full size.

Euna Oh, a 15-year-old artist from Marietta, Georgia, has been announced as the winner of the annual 2013 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Art Competition held April 3, 2013, in Atlanta, Georgia. Five judges unanimously selected Euna’s acrylic rendition of a pair of mallards out of 619 total entries as the Georgia Best of Show.

Oh will receive a $175 scholarship from Georgia Power, a long-time sponsor of the Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Program, as well as additional prizes. As Georgia’s Best of Show, her original artwork will be sent to compete in the national Junior Duck Stamp Competition being held Friday, April 19, at the National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia. The Junior Duck Stamp Contest is sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

“I’m so excited,” Euna Oh said. “My art teacher encouraged me to participate in the Georgia Junior Duck Stamp completion.”

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Last updated: March 25, 2014
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