Alamosa/Monte Vista/Baca National Wildlife Refuge Complex
Mountain-Prairie Region
Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge
Preserving our Natural Heritage
The Rio Grande River winds through Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge

The Rio Grande River winds through Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge

Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1962 as a haven for migratory birds and other wildlife. 14,345 foot Mt. Blanca of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains provides a stunning backdrop for this 11,169 acre refuge.

Alamosa NWR consists of wet meadows, river oxbows and riparian corridor primarily within the flood plain of the Rio Grande, and dry uplands vegetated with greasewood and saltbush. These areas support songbirds, water birds, raptors, mule deer, beaver and coyotes.

 

The riparian habitat of Alamosa NWR is important songbird habitat

The riparian habitat of Alamosa NWR is important songbird habitat

Alamosa NWR has a wilder character than Monte Vista NWR. To preserve this wildness, the refuge is less intensively managed. However, water is still manipulated and other management tools such as burning and grazing are used. Water from the Rio Grande is supplemented by artesian wells and pumped water from the Closed Basin Project.

The headquarters and visitor center for the San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex is located on Alamosa NWR.

A two mile round trip hiking trail begins at the Visitor's Center and follows the Rio Grande. The Bluff Overlook on the eastern side of the refuge may be reached by car and provides a three and a half mile auto tour.

Last updated: October 5, 2012