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Kofa
National Wildlife Refuge


9300 E. 28th Street
Yuma, AZ   85365
E-mail: fw2_rw_kofa@fws.gov
Phone Number: 928-783-7861
Visit the Refuge's Web Site:
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/kofa/
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  Overview
Kofa National Wildlife Refuge
Established in 1939, Kofa National Wildlife Refuge encompasses 665,400 acres of pristine desert. The Refuge provides essential habitat for Desert Bighorn Sheep, the California Fan Palm, and other wildlife and plants.

Desert Bighorn Sheep are found chiefly in the two mountain ranges that dominate the refuge landscape - the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains. Although these mountains are not especially high, they are extremely rugged and rise sharply from the surrounding desert plains, providing excellent bighorn sheep habitat.

80% of Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, 516,300 acres, is federally designated wilderness. Wilderness is protected to ensure that nature, not people is the primary influence on this quiet, scenic place.


Getting There . . .
To the office:

From Tucson: From I-8, take the Fortuna Drive exit. Turn right onto Fortuna and move into the left turn lane at the next stop light. Turn left onto North Frontage Road. Follow North Frontage to Avenue 9E. Turn right onto 9E. Follow 9E past the RV Resort and turn right onto 28th Street. We are the second building on the left (the first is Arizona Game and Fish Department at the intersection of 28th and 9E.)

From California: From I-8, take the Fortuna Drive exit. Turn left onto Fortuna. Follow Fortuna over the overpass and turn left at the 2nd stoplight. This is North Frontage Road. Follow North Frontage to Avenue 9E. Turn right onto 9E. Follow 9E past the RV Resort and turn right onto 28th Street. We are the second building on the left (the first is Arizona Game and Fish Department at the intersection of 28th and 9E.)

To the Refuge: From Yuma, take Highway 95 north towards Quartzite, Arizona, to refuge entrance signs.


Get Google map and directions to this refuge/WMD from a specified address:

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These driving directions are provided as a general guide only. No representation is made or warranty given as to their content, road conditions or route usability or expeditiousness. User assumes all risk of use.

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Wildlife and Habitat

Notable wildlife species found in the area include the white-winged dove, desert tortoise, and desert kit fox. Approximately 800 to 1,000 bighorn sheep now live in the refuge and, in recent years, this herd has provided animals for transplanting throughout Arizona and neighboring states.

Birds that are likely to be seen at Kofa include American kestrel, white-winged dove, northern flicker, Say's phoebe, cactus wren, phainopepla, and orange-crowned warbler.

The Kofa Mountain barberry (a rare plant found only in southwest Arizona) occurs on the refuge.

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History
In the early part of this century, a number of mines were established in the mountainous areas of the refuge. One of the most notable was the King of Arizona mine. It gave the Kofa Mountains their name - "Kofa" being contracted from King of Arizona.

Kofa was included in the desert military training exercises conducted by General Patton during World War II. Unexploded ordinance may be encountered during cross-country hiking. Picking up items that appear to be military hardware could be hazardous to your health. Please report these items to the Refuge as soon as possible by calling 928-783-7861.

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    Recreation and Education Opportunities
Hunting
Photography
Wildlife Observation
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Management Activities
Water is always scarce in a desert. Natural water sources are highly variable and may not last until seasonal rains can replenish the supply. By enlarging natural water holes, shading them to reduce evaporation, and blasting artificial basins in areas previously without a water supply, refuge managers have greatly increased the availability and reliability of water.

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