Skip Navigation

About the Refuge

512_Aleutian_Cackling_Geese_with_Cranes_Lee_Eastman

“Wild beasts and birds are by right not the property merely of the people who are alive today, but the property of unknown generations, whose belongings we have no right to squander.”
Theodore Roosevelt -- American President, outdoorsman, naturalist, and leader of the early conservation movement.
 


Established in 1987, the San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge is 7,000 acres in size and located in California's Stanislaus County. The Refuge is situated where three major rivers (Tuolumne, Stanislaus and San Joaquin) join in the San Joaquin Valley, creating a mix of habitats that provide ideal conditions for high wildlife and plant diversity. The Refuge was initially established primarily to protect and manage habitat for the Aleutian cackling goose – a federally listed endangered species at that time. Today, the Refuge is managed with a focus on migratory birds and endangered species. The Refuge is part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System which consists of over 500 refuges and forms the largest network of public lands in the world managed principally for fish and wildlife.

 

Page Photo Credits

Aleutian Cackling Geese and Sandhill Cranes © Lee Eastman

Last Updated: Dec 21, 2012
Return to main navigation