Connecticut River Coordinator's Office
Northeast Region
 
Photo of a biologist releasing a fish into the Connecticut River. Credit: USFWS
Photo of a biologist releasing a fish into the Connecticut River. Credit: USFWS

Although nearly 40 years of Atlantic Salmon restoration in the Connecticut River Basin resulted in low adult returns since the 1990s, primarily due to marine conditions, a collective commitment to migratory fish restoration has succeeded in bringing us many benefits, including:

Hundreds of thousands of fish . . .

Each spring, hundreds of thousands of fish migrate from the ocean to the Connecticut River: Atlantic salmon, American shad, blueback herring, alewife, striped bass, sea lamprey, American eel, and shortnose sturgeon. Since the program began in 1967, shad counted at the Holyoke Dam have increased from 16,000 to over 300,000!

Photo of the Hatchery Manager of the Richard Cronin National Salmon Station (MA) sorting Atlantic salmon at spawning time. Credit: USFWS
Photo of the Hatchery Manager of the Richard Cronin National Salmon Station (MA) sorting Atlantic salmon at spawning time. Credit: USFWS

Sport fishing opportunities!

Migratory fish restoration efforts have resulted in extraordinary American shad and striped bass fishing! Call (413) 548-9628 or visit this page during the spring for daily migratory fish counts. In each of the four basin states, you can also fish for adult Atlantic salmon outside of the Connecticut River watershed. For more information about fishing opportunities, contact your state fish and wildlife agency.

A chance to look and learn . . .

The Connecticut River Migratory Fish Restoration Program provides unique opportunities to see migratory fish at hatcheries, fish ladders, and in the wild. These viewing and volunteer opportunities provide rewarding educational experiences. Come see an Atlantic salmon up-close!

A healthier river for everyone.

For 30 years, local environmental groups, private industry, and state and federal agencies have all worked together to help restore migratory fish. This unique collaboration ensures that efforts will remain focused, providing for the long-term health of the Connecticut River. Visit these links for more information on the environmental needs of the fish, and what you or your organization can do to help.

 

 
Last updated: January 24, 2013
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