Connecticut River Coordinator's Office
Northeast Region
 
Photo of the Connecticut River Coordinator releasing an adult Atlantic salmon in the Westfield River, MA Credit: MAFW / Bill Byrne
Photo of the Connecticut River Coordinator releasing an adult Atlantic salmon in the Westfield River, MA Credit: MAFW / Bill Byrne

Jobs For Students Only

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has some special non-competitive hiring authorities for students. These are the This link opens in a new windowStudent Temporary Employment Program (STEP) and the Student Career Experience Program (SCEP).

Both programs are open to students aged 16 and older who are enrolled at least half-time in high school, college or graduate school. The STEP program is designed to introduce students to work in the government while the SCEP is for recruiting future employees by providing work in a field related to their study while pursuing an academic degree. Pay ranges from about $10-$18 per hour. A SCEP student may be converted to a permanent position non-competitively.

Students can apply for a STEP and SCEP positions by sending in a cover letter, resume or OF-612, college transcript, and a This link opens in a new windowDepartment of Interior Background Survey, DI-1935.

The application for jobs in the Connecticut River watershed and throughout the Northeast should be sent to: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Attention Carol Keyes, Division of Human Resources, 300 Westgate Center Drive, Hadley, MA 01035-9589.

The American Fisheries Society offers high school students a special opportunity to get some hands-on experience in the Fisheries field through the This link opens in a new windowHutton Junior Fisheries Biology Program.

Photo of Dan Wong catching an Atlantic
salmon kelt for spawning at the North Attleboro NFH. Credit: USFWS
Photo of Dan Wong catching an Atlantic salmon kelt for spawning at the North Attleboro NFH. Credit: USFWS

Jobs for Everyone

Special hiring authorities exist for people with disabilities, disabled veterans, and etc. For more information on these types of opportunities, please contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Attention Carol Keyes, Division of Human Resources, 300 Westgate Center Drive, Hadley, MA 01035-9589.

How Do You Apply?

First, follow the directions on the job announcement. Then, really think about what information should be included on your resume or application for this job. At a minimum, you should include the following:

  • Job Announcement Number, title of the position and grade of job for which you are applying

  • Your full name, mailing address, day and evening phone with area code

  • Your social security number

  • Your country of citizenship

  • Any Veteran’s Preference, reinstatement eligibility, and/or highest Federal civilian grade held with job series and date

  • Education from high school through college – include name, city, state date of diploma, date and type of degree, major

  • College transcript, if requested

  • Job-related training, courses, certificates, licenses

  • Job-related skills

  • Job-related honors and accomplishments, professional society memberships, etc.

  • Summary of job-related paid and nonpaid work experience including job title, duties and accomplishments, employer’s name and address, supervisor’s name and phone number, starting and ending dates, salary, number of hours worked per week

  • Indicate if we may contact your current supervisor

USFWS Careers

Clerical positions – require computer operation and word processing skills; also often involve budget tracking, purchasing, paying bills, filing, answering phones, greeting visitors, and etc.

Maintenance workers – requires skill in trades and crafts like plumbing, carpentry, welding, auto mechanics; also may involve rearing fish, operating machinery, pumps and equipment, driving trucks, maintaining and repairing vehicles, facilities and equipment, and the computer reporting that is required to document these activities.

Technical positions – engineers are involved with construction and maintenance of facilities and fishways, computer specialists program and maintain automated systems, public relations people work with the news media, Congress and partners to share information, biological science technicians conduct surveys and experiments. Coursework and or a degree may be required for some of these positions.

Law enforcement officers – investigate criminal activities, enforce wildlife laws, protect fish and wildlife and ensure the safety of visitors to federal facilities, this often involves preparing cases for court.

Biologists come in several forms, general, wildlife and fish biologists. Fish biologists restore fish and other aquatic species and their habitat. This often involves working to remove barriers to fish passage, preventing the spread of aquatic nuisance species, monitoring fish populations, managing fish health, producing and releasing fish from hatcheries, writing fishery management plans, assessing contaminants in the water and etc. Fishery Biologist positions require a college degree in biology or natural resource management. Coursework must include 6 semester hours in aquatic subjects and 12 semester hours in animal sciences.

 

 
Last updated: September 1, 2010
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