II. 1 Description of GPRA Program Activity:
 
Habitat Conservation: Network of Lands and Waters
 
An ecologically diverse network of lands and waters -- of various ownerships -- is conserved in cooperation with others to provide habitats for migratory birds, imperiled species, interjurisdictional fish, marine mammals and species of international concern associated with those ecosystems.
 
The goals under the GPRA Program Activity - Habitat Conservation -- recognizes the fundamental importance of habitat to the self-Sustainability of fish and wildlife and plants. Habitat includes a rich variety of community types and cover a range of extending from nearly aquatic wetlands along our coasts and myriad rivers, lakes and streams, to mountain tops and arid desert locations.
 
We realize that protection of habitats is equally importance as that of animal and plant communities. "Patchwork conversions of natural landscapes for agriculture, silviculture, and development result in a fragmentation that leaves small remnant areas of natural ecosystems. As these natural patches become smaller and more isolated, their ability to maintain healthy populations of many plant and animal species is reduced. As individual species are lost from each fragment, the community changes and both species and ecosystem diversity are reduced. Thus, large numbers of natural ecosystems are now in danger." [Our Living Resources-A Report to the Nation on the Distribution, Abundance, and Health of U.S. Plants, Animals, and Ecosystems, 1995]
 
The long-term goals comprising this GPRA program activity include the protection restoration and enhancement of lands managed by the Service, stewardship of infrastructure on Service owned lands, and voluntary restoration and enhancement of others' lands.

II.2 Related Appropriated Funds to GPRA Program Activity
 
The following table provides a crosswalk of total appropriated funds to the GPRA Program Activity [Mission Goal]: Habitat Conservation: Network of Lands and Waters for FY 1999 Enacted Appropriations and FY 2000 President's Budget Request.
 
($000)  FY 1999 Operating Plan  FY 2000 Request Change  
1999/2000
FY 1999  
Enacted 
Mission Goal II: Habitat Conservation  FY 2000 President's 
Budget 
Mission Goal II: Habitat Conservation
TOTAL APPROPRIATED FUNDS  802,192 373,630 950,001 426,000 +52,370
 

II.3 Proposed Legislation:

Performance goals and accomplishment of those goals are not contingent on enactment of legislation during the fiscal year covered by the annual performance plan.

II.4 Impact of FY 2000 Budget Changes:

The annual performance plan for FY 2000 reflects essential funding increases to meet targeted performance. A total increase of $52.4 million, over the FY 1999 enacted level, would be directed towards conserving, in cooperation with others, an ecologically diverse network of land and waters of various ownerships to provide habitats for migratory birds, imperiled species, interjurisdictional fish, marine mammals, and species of international concern associated with those ecosystems. This annual performance plan reflects the FY 2000 proposal - Lands Legacy Initiative - to save the best of our natural endowment for all time. The Lands Legacy Initiative will add 118,400 acres to the National Wildlife Refuge System over the next three years.
 

FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal Summary
 
Annual Performance Goal 2.1 - Habitat Conservation on Service Lands
 
A funding increase of $5.0 million will ensure that the habitat needs of the Service lands will be met by ensuring that 93,822,296 acres (total acreage managed by the Service) are protected, of which, 3,377,260 will be enhanced or restored; and that 80 percent of contaminated cleanup projects are completed. The increase will focus on supporting 76 priority projects at 75 refuges to eradicate or control the spread of invasive plants and feral animals which destroy native habitat that support resident fish and wildlife, as well as migratory birds; protecting and managing coral reefs on or near seven refuges in the Pacific, South Atlantic, the Caribbean; and addressing the pollutant problems impacting riverine habitats and wetlands and will assess the impacts of environmental contaminants on the declining population of amphibians in the United States.

An additional 255,000 acres will be added to the National Wildlife Refuge System in FY 2000 as a result of ongoing land acquisition projects and new projects provided through the Lands Legacy Initiative.

Annual Performance Goal 2.2 - Infrastructure Stewardship on Service Lands
 
Another primary area of focus is operating, maintaining, and rehabilitating the infrastructure of National Wildlife Refuges and National Fish Hatcheries. Over the years, increasing deferred maintenance and capital improvement needs have threatened our success in mission delivery -- protection and conservation of natural resources and assurance of safe and healthful environments for visitors and employees.
 
A 1998 Interior study "Facilities Maintenance Assessment and Recommendations," has re-emphasized the need to seek sufficient funding for day to day maintenance and capital improvements; and develop a Five-Year Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan. As part of this Five Year Plan, critical health, safety, natural resource protection, critical mission, and equipment replacement projects are given highest priority. The result of the Service's initial facility assessment is that most facilities are in poor condition. The Service has established a strategic and annual performance goal to address this critical issue.
 
The Service FY 2000 budget request includes a total of $64.5 million to address critical projects: $34 million for refuge maintenance, $6.7 million for hatchery maintenance, and $150,000 for law enforcement maintenance in the Resource Management account, and $23.6 million in the Construction account for refuge, hatchery, and law enforcement rehabilitation projects. The FY 2000 request will reduce the critical deferred maintenance needs by 10.7 percent
 
In addition, the FY 2000 request include an increase of $ 73.6 million for acquiring land and water and interests therein to protect nationally important wetlands and fish and wildlife habitat, for preservation and recovery of listed endangered and threatened species and other important species, and for public use and enjoyment. These budget increases are key to the Department's Five Year Plan to address critical health and safety needs in maintenance and construction, as well as for ongoing natural, cultural and resource protection.

Annual Performance Goal 2.3 - Habitat Conservation off Service Lands
 
Achievement of the FY 2000 performance target to enhance, restore or create 55,300 acres of wetland habitats, restore 86,540 acres of upland habitats and enhance and restore 737 riparian or stream miles of habitats off Service lands assumes a funding increase of $10.7 million over the FY 1999 enacted level. Wetland losses exceeded 53% of the originally occurring wetlands in the continental U.S. between 1780's and 1980's. Approximately 90% of tallgrass prairie in the Midwest and great plains has been destroyed. These ecosystems are important habitats for a large number of federal trust species and are important to reducing flooding, decreasing sediment and nutrient loads, and the protection and improvement of the quality and quantity of the nations' waters.

Additional resources will focus on working with the regional organizations and agricultural communities to restore riverine habitats and wetlands; working public and private landowners to restore fish and wildlife habitat within the high plains regions; supporting interagency species monitoring and to provide technical assistance to the U.S. Forest Service on land management practices and timber sales on sensitive habitat within the Tongass National Forest in southeast Alaska; and reviewing an additional 60 FERC applications and recommending actions for improving fish passage and wildlife habitat resources that are more compatible with planned hydroelectric power developments at 250 dams. An additional $540,000 will be directed to the habitat restoration improvements to benefit fish passage to spawning areas and replenish imperiled native fish, such as redband trout, leopard darter, American shad and sturgeon, and stripped bass.

The Service will achieve the FY 2000 performance off service lands through increased technical assistance efforts, an increase of $1.3 million over the FY 1999 enacted level, in support of the California Bay-Delta program. Technical assistance will support the assessment of potential fish, wildlife, and habitat restoration projects on applications for FERC hydropower relicensing and other water management projects, consistent with the California Bay-Delta Environmental Enhancement Act. The Service will also assist federal, state, and local agencies in planning and implementing habitat restoration and species recovery actions.

Enhanced efforts in coastal areas is needed to assure the availability of essential habitat for 45 % of the endangered and threatened species, approximately 50% of migratory non-game birds of management concern and 30% of North American waterfowl that winter in coastal areas. In addition, over 66% of all fish caught worldwide depend on coastal estuaries. The FY 2000 performance assumes an increase of $1.5 million to expand the Service expertise in habitat restoration and conservation in coastal areas. Service coastal programs specifically in Alaska, Hawaii, Texas, and the Great Lakes region will expand habitat restoration and conservation partnership activities benefiting fish, wildlife, and migratory bird habitat. An additional $1.5 million will be directed to update the status and trends reports on the location of existing wetlands, for use with overlays of contaminant and other geospatial information, for improved watershed planning by federal agencies and state, local and tribal governments.
 
About $375,000 of the increase is for work with regional organizations and agricultural landowners to restore riverine habitats and wetlands in this important flyway for migratory waterfowl, especially ducks and geese.

II.5 EXHIBIT A
GPRA PROGRAM ACTIVITY 
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
BA ($000)
FY 2000 
Proposed 
BA ($000)
Habitat Conservation: Network of Lands and Waters 
$373,630
$426,000
 
Long-term Goal: Habitat Conservation On Service Lands
2.1 Through 2003, meet the identified habitat needs of Service lands by ensuring that 93,850,000 acres (total acreage managed by FWS) are protected, of which 3,500,000 acres will be enhanced or restored. In addition, 80 percent of contaminated cleanup projects on Service lands will be completed according to their original schedule. 
 
FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal: 
2.1.1 By September 30, 2000, meet the identified habitat needs of the Service lands by ensuring that 93,822,296 acres are protected, of which 3,377,260 acres will be enhanced or restored. 
Performance Measures FY 1997  
Actual 
FY 1998
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
FY 2000 
Proposed
Plan 
Actual 
1. # acres managed by FWS [cumulative]. 92,873,832 93,134,000 93,312,296 93,567,296 93,822,296
2. # acres managed by FWS as a result of the Lands Legacy Initiative. [acres for LLI are included in totals above]  --- --- --- --- 118,400 [acquired over 3 years]
3. # acres enhanced or restored in the National Wildlife Refuge System. 
[annual data]
2,647,000 3,298,410 3,347,210 3,303,341 3,377,260
Workload and Other Performance Statistics 
North American Wetlands Conservation Fund 
1. # acres of habitat protected 98,490 122,652 122,652 151,047 180,862
 
Operational Processes, Technology, Financial and Human Resources Necessary to Achieve Each Performance Goal within the GPRA Program Activity:
 
Goal Purpose:
 
Habitat is fundamental for self-sustaining populations of fish, wildlife and plants as well as for functional ecosystems. The Service's goal is to conserve fish and wildlife by protecting and restoring the habitat on which they depend. The National Wildlife Refuge System, with more than 500 refuges and 93 million acres, protects virtually every type of habitat found in the United States for the benefit of fish and wildlife species. The objective of this goal is to protect and manage habitat quality of the lands and waters owned and managed by the Service, principally the National Wildlife Refuge System.
 
Protecting, enhancing or restoring habitat involves placing acreage under active management practices that are compatible with fish and wildlife management.
 
FY 2000 Performance -- Goal Achievement:
 
The FY 2000 performance targets for habitat protection and restoration and enhancement are based on the assumption that $5.0 million increase requested over the FY 1999 level for Refuge Operations - Habitat Improvement is realized and expansion of land owner ship by 192,382 acres through appropriations of $116.9 million in Land Acquisition, and Migratory Bird Conservation Fund is completed.
 
Protection targets for this goal reflect increased size of the National Wildlife Refuge System through the addition of new lands. Funding for land acquisition is provided through the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund (made up of annual receipts from Duck Stamps sales, refuge recreation fees, import duties on arms and ammunition, etc.) and the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) appropriations. The funds are generally obligated, but not necessarily expended, for specific projects during the Fiscal Year. Resources requested for FY 2000 LWCF land acquisition are $73.6 million, an increase of $25.6 million over the FY 1999 enacted level. The resources requested will add 118,425 acres to the refuge system.
 
Habitat restoration and enhancement on Service lands, which includes ongoing annual management activities, are vital to meeting fish and wildlife needs on refuges. Approximately 37% or $72.5 million of the annual operations budget of the National Wildlife Refuge System is devoted to this function. The NWR System restores and improves over 3 million acres of important wildlife habitat annually.
 
For FY 2000, the refuges have identified an additional 51,908 of habitat requiring restoration or enhancement necessary for endangered plant communities and to improve the biological integrity of unique ecosystems. This level of performance assume an increase of $5.0 million, over the FY 1999 enacted level for Refuge Operations, providing support for 28 projects on 75 refuges. Strategies to achieve targeted performance for FY 2000 include --

These efforts, coupled with the work accomplished through the North American Wetland Conservation Fund will provide for restoration and enhancement of 709,465 acres since FY 1997.
 
FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal: 
2.1.2 By September 30, 2000, complete 80 percent of contaminated cleanup projects on Service lands. 
Performance Measures FY  
1997  
Actual 
FY 1998
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
FY 2000 
Proposed
Plan 
Actual 
1. # cleanup projects completed. [data reported on annual basis] 40 76% 
[32 of 42 projects]
80% 
[24* of 30 
projects]
80% 
[19 of 24 clean-up 
projects]
80% 
[19 of 24 clean-up 
projects]
 
* Change in estimates of projects reflects the scope in projects undertaken. Projects planned were smaller in scope with costs of $80,000 each to complete; projects actually undertaken and completed in FY 1998 and being undertaken in FY 1999 are larger in scope costing an average of $100,000 each to complete.
 
Operational Processes, Technology, Financial and Human Resources Necessary to Achieve Each Performance Goal within the GPRA Program Activity:
 
Goal Purpose:
 
The purpose of this goal is to assure quality fish and wildlife habitats is provided on refuges by removing identified contaminants on refuges.
 
Resource Condition:
 
A variety of contaminant problems exist on refuges largely as a result of activities occurring on refuges prior to their becoming refuges or from the activities occurring on lands adjacent to refuges. Abandon mine sites, former military bases, abandoned landfills, and runoff from nearby activities have contributed to contaminant activities on refuges. The refuge system maintains a budget of $4.7 million to carry out this activity including $2.4 million for cleanup of smaller scale contaminated sites. Larger scale cleanups may be funded from a Departmentwide account. This goal reports on the smaller scale projects funded within refuge operations.
 
FY 2000 Performance - Goal Achievement:
 
The FY 2000 performance targets assume that the Service' FY 2000 budget request for contaminant cleanup on refuges will remain level, $4.7 million, the amount appropriated in FY 1999. The number of projects being completed each year is declining; smaller project were completed initially leaving larger scale project remaining. The FY 1999 and FY 2000 performance assumes the completion of larger scale projects at an estimated costs of $100,000 each. Projects planned for FY 2000 include cleanup of hazardous/injurious material on 230,000 acres and 17 contaminant investigations.
 
GPRA PROGRAM ACTIVITY 
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
BA ($000)
FY 2000 
Proposed 
BA ($000)
Habitat Conservation: Network of Land and Waters $373,630 $426,000
 
Long-term Goal: Infrastructure Stewardship On Service Lands
2.2 By 2003, 23 percent of mission critical water management and public use facilities will be in fair or good condition as measured by the Facilities Condition Index. 
 
FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal: 
2.2.1 By December 30, 1999, the baseline will be established for the Facilities Condition Index. 
Performance Measures FY  
1997  
Actual 
FY 1998
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
FY 2000 
Proposed
Plan 
Actual 
1. % of facilities have current replacement values established.  N/A N/A N/A In Process Baseline Established 
2. Identification of mission critical water management & public use facilities.  N/A N/A  N/A  In Process Baseline Established
Workload and Other Performance Statistics 
Fisheries/Hatchery
1. # unfunded projects in maintenance backlog. 1,505 1,702 1,783 1,983 2,170
2. Monetary value of projects in maintenance backlog (stated in millions of dollars)  $118 $218 $215 $252 $300
 
Operational Processes, Technology, Financial and Human Resources Necessary to Achieve Each Performance Goal within the GPRA Program Activity:
 
Goals 2.2.1 and 2.2.2 Purpose:
 
The long-term and annual goal targets for infrastructure stewardship are based on preliminary facilities condition information contained in the Service's Maintenance Management System. Efforts to improve and update baseline data is in progress and will be completed by December 1999. Goal targets and performance measures will be verified or revised at that time.
 
These goals improve the condition of fish and wildlife resources and ensures that employees and visitors safe use and access by providing critical maintenance on National Wildlife Refuges and National Fish Hatcheries. The objectives are: (a) identify Servicewide maintenance and rehabilitation needs, (b) establish maintenance and construction priorities based on critical health, safety, natural and cultural resource projects (c) reduce the current backlog of maintenance projects by 8.6 percent, (d) reduce pollution on Service lands, and (e) ensure that Service employees and visitors continue to have safe access and use of refuges and hatcheries.
 
Resource Condition:
 
A wide array of equipment and facilities is necessary to enable carrying out the wide variety of land management and public use functions within the refuge and hatchery systems. Adequate maintenance of facilities and equipment is essential to the efficient and effective management of lands. The management of data related to maintenance is undergoing substantial change within the Department at present. Standardized definitions and approaches are being applied to the development of 5 year plans describing maintenance needs. Simultaneously, federal accounting standards dealing with management of plant, property and equipment is changing perspectives on frameworks for measuring overall health of facility infrastructure. Emphasis is shifting from a tendency for agencies to focus on size of maintenance backlogs to focusing on condition of facilities. This change in approach will require improved data to describe and estimate the replacement value of all equipment and facilities. Data ownership of personal property is good but replacement costs have not been fully analyzed. Data on ownership of real property is good for buildings but is not comprehensive for many other facilities such as dikes, water control structures, bridges, fences, etc.
 
FY 2000 Goal 2.2.1 Achievement:
 
A more comprehensive collection of data on the extent and nature of real and personal property along with an estimate of replacement values is needed to help gauge the relative health of refuge assets and to better focus limited maintenance funds to accomplish highest priority needs. The Service is actively moving to adopt these evolving new procedures and will be in a position at the end of the first quarter of FY 2000 to comprehensively display needs in this new mode.
 
FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal:  
2.2.2 By September 30, 2000, 4% of mission critical water management and public use facilities will be in fair or good condition as measured by the Facilities Condition Index, will be completed. 
Performance Measures FY 1997  
Actual 
FY 1998
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
FY 2000 
Proposed
Plan 
Actual 
1. # mission critical water management facilities N/A N/A N/A In Process Baseline Established
2. # of mission critical water management facilities in fair or good N/A N/A N/A In Process Baseline Established
3. # mission critical public use facilities.  N/A N/A N/A In Process Baseline Established
4. # mission critical public use facilities in fair or good condition.  N/A N/A N/A In Process Baseline Established
 
Facilities and Condition:
 
Service infrastructure includes over 5,000 building, 7,000 miles of roads, 3,000 miles of dikes, thousands of water control structures, and a variety of vehicles and equipment. Industry standards suggest that annual funding of maintenance be 2 to 4% of the replacement value of facilities. Over the past 10 years, Service facilities have received approximately 1% of the replacement value-- resulting in a growing list of deferred maintenance projects. Based on a preliminary estimate of Facility Condition Index (cost of deferred maintenance projects as a fraction the total capitalized value of the facility) the average refuge or hatchery facility must be characterized as being in poor condition.
 
The Service uses a Maintenance Management System (MMS) to identify the extent of Servicewide maintenance and rehabilitation needs, establish regional and field station priorities for maintenance projects, and identify projects to be accomplished. The MMS plan (FY 1999) totals $924 million in deferred maintenance and rehabilitation needs, including $624.7 million that is eligible for funding within the Resource Management account and $299.3 million that is eligible for funding within the Construction account. The Service's highest priority projects are health, safety, natural resource protection, critical mission, and equipment replacement projects. These priority projects total $605.4 million, including $433 million for refuge facilities, $160.8 million for hatchery facilities, and $11.5 million for law enforcement facilities.
 
FY 2000 Performance - 2.2.2 Goal Achievement:
 
The Service FY 2000 budget request includes a total of $64.5 million to address critical projects: $34 million for refuge maintenance, $6.7 million for hatchery maintenance, and $150,000 for law enforcement maintenance in the Resource Management account, and $23.6 million in the Construction account for refuge, hatchery, and law enforcement rehabilitation projects. The FY 2000 request will reduce the critical deferred maintenance needs by 10.7 percent.
 
GPRA PROGRAM ACTIVITY 
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
BA ($000)
FY 2000 
Proposed 
BA($000)
Habitat Conservation: Network of Lands and Waters $373,630 $426,000
 
Long-term Goal: Habitat Conservation Off Service Lands
2.3 By 2003, improve fish and wildlife populations focusing on trust resources, threatened and endangered species, and species of special concern by enhancing and/or restoring or creating 250,000 acres of wetlands habitat, restoring 395,000 acres of upland habitats, and enhancing and/or restoring 2,500 riparian or stream miles of habitat off-Service land through partnerships and other identified conservation strategies. 
 
FY 2000 Annual Performance Goal: 
2.3.1 By September 30, 2000, improve fish and wildlife populations focusing on trust resources, threatened and endangered species, and species of special concern by enhancing and/or restoring or creating 55,300 acres of wetlands habitat, restoring 86,540 acres of upland habitats, and enhancing and/or restoring 737 riparian or stream miles of habitat off-Service land through partnerships and other identified conservation strategies. 
Performance Measures 
[data reported on annual basis]
FY 1997  
Actual 
FY 1998
FY 1999 
Operating Plan 
FY 2000 
Proposed
Plan 
Actual 
1. # acres of wetlands habitat enhanced/ restored/created.  58,300 45,800 47,384 47,400 55,300
2. # acres of wetlands habitat protected through the North American Wetlands Conservation Fund 17,004 10,229 10,229 5,102 5,357
3. # acres of upland habitat enhanced/restored.  108,890 67,940 70,516 78,140 86,540
4. # acres of upland habitats protected through the North American Wetlands Conservation Fund 52,054 31,313 31,313 15,619 16,400
5. # miles riparian or stream habitat enhanced/restored.  596 523 913 661 737
6. # acres of riparian habitat protected through the North American Wetlands Conservation Fund. 345 261 206 103 109
 
Operational Processes, Technology, Financial and Human Resources Necessary to Achieve Each Performance Goal:
 
Goal Purpose:
 
The primary objective of this annual goal is to enhance and/or restore various important habitats off-Service lands to improve fish and wildlife populations. The focus will be on wetland, upland, and riparian habitats that benefit those trust resources for which the Service has primary responsibility, including threatened and endangered species, migratory birds, anadromous fish, and certain marine mammals.
 
Resource Condition:
 
Habitat is fundamental for self-sustaining populations of fish, wildlife and plants as well as for functional ecosystems. The health of fish and wildlife and plants is greatly affected by the quantity and quality of their habitat. Over 26 % of forests in the United States, 50% of wetlands and 95% of native prairies are lost. Declines of wildlife populations have paralleled declines in both the quality and quantity of habitats -- surveys indicated that 56% of neotropical migratory bird species and 57% of waterfowl species are in decline. Population declines have resulted from a variety of factors including -- habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation and competition from non-native species.
 
The Nation has lost approximately 100 million acres of wetlands since colonial times, and wetland losses continue today. In addition, many of the wetlands still present on the landscape do not function at their full potential due to activities on the surrounding lands, including agricultural and urban development. Upland habitats have been lost or severely degraded through a variety of land use practices. Some portions of the Nation, such as the intensively farmed Plains states, have less than 1% of their original native upland vegetation. Riparian areas also continue to be converted to other land uses, or degraded by surrounding agricultural and urban activities. With over 70% per cent of the Nation's lands in non-Federal ownership, most of the opportunities for enhancing and restoring these habitats lie with the private landowner.
 
Although rivers and lakes cover less than 1% of the Earth's surface, they contain 12% of the world's known animal species, including 41% of all known fishes. However, aquatic habitats are rapidly being converted to other land uses, or are being degraded by agricultural and urban activities. Loss of aquatic habitats is the primary cause of aquatic species extinctions, ESA listings, and fishery stock declines. Nearly one-third of all fish, two thirds of all crayfish, and three fourths of freshwater mussels are at risk of extinction, largely due to habitat loss. Only 2% of the Nation's 3.1 million miles of rivers remain free flowing. Over 75,000 dams six feet or higher and 2.5 million smaller dams block or impede fish passage, blocking over 600,000 miles of stream habitat. Numerous other obstructions also impede passage, including poorly designed culverts and dikes, unscreened water diversion facilities, and collapsed stream banks.
 
FY 2000 Performance - Goal Achievement:
 
This goal will be achieved by: (1) continuing to utilize voluntary, non-regulatory Service programs such as the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program and the Coastal Program which emphasize voluntary habitat enhancement and restoration on private lands; (2) continuing to develop partnerships with other agencies - such as the U. S. Department of Agriculture - and organizations - such as the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation - to leverage funding for habitat restoration; and (3) actively providing technical assistance to individuals, agencies, and organizations involved in natural resource conservation.
 
For FY 2000, the Service is committed to the restoration/enhancement or creation of 55,300 acres of wetland, restoration of over 86,000 acres of uplands and enhancement/restoration of over 700 riparian or stream miles. Service programs directly involved with habitat conservation efforts off Service lands include the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Coastal Program, Project Planning, Fish and Wildlife Management Assistance, North American Waterfowl Management Plan, National Wetlands Conservation Act Grants Program, and the National Wildlife Refuge System.
 
To achieve this FY 2000 goal, the Service will increase efforts by directing additional resources of $10.7 million over the FY 1999 enacted level to voluntary agreements with private landowner -- administered through the Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Project Planning providing expert biological and ecological consultations to states and federal agencies involved with development projects that may impact fish and wildlife habitats, and the Coastal programs and maintain the North American Wetlands Conservation Fund program. Further, the Service will focus on restoring habitat and passage for native fish by addressing the 75,000 dams six feet or higher and some 2.5 million smaller obstructions currently found in our nation's waterways today. Habitat restoration efforts will occur in the Mississippi River Basin, South Florida, the High Plains, the Pacific Northwest, desert Southwest, Maine and Alaska.
 
Benefits Realized from Goal Achievement:

For Further Information, Contact Al Zara at: al_zara@fws.gov

Table of Contents:FY 2000 Annual Performance Plan
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