Organization of the Annual Performance Plan

The organization of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's (Service) FY 1999 Annual Performance Plan reflects the Department of the Interior's (DOI) approach to improve and streamline the Annual Performance Plan and better link the Plan with the Budget. The revised Annual Performance Plan presents the Service's goals and measures, and identifies the FY 1999 strategies and resources needed to achieve them, consistent with the Strategic Plan and budget proposal.

By following this presentation framework, DOI will be able to not only meet the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) but promote managerial accountability through a direct connection with the Strategic Plan, resources, and outcomes. The Annual Performance Plan links coherently with goals contained in the Strategic Plan. The Annual Performance Plan sets forth in measurable and quantifiable form the levels of performance for each goal in the budget year. The Annual Performance Plan also links to the Service's budget request to Congress for FY 1999. This presentation provides decisionmakers a context by which to make informed decisions on the allocation or reallocation of resources to better accomplish the mission of the organization.

The Annual Performance Plan for FY 1999 is divided into three sections:

Section I -- Introduction and Overview states the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mission.

Section II -- Goals includes Annual Performance Plan summary and descriptive goal narrative covering FY 1997, FY 1998, and FY 1999 enacted.

Section III -- Performance Measures and Verification provides a simple presentation of the Service's methods to verify and validate the measured values of actual performance.
 
 

I. Introduction and Overview

I.1 Introduction

The Service's origins date back to 1871 when Congress established the U.S. Fish Commission to study the decrease in the nation's food fish and recommend ways to reverse the decline. Today the Service has the privilege of being the primary federal agency responsible for the protection, conservation, and renewal of fish and wildlife and their habitats for this and future generations. However, it must be clearly recognized that because fish and wildlife resources know no boundaries nor land ownership patterns, the conservation of those resources (mission of the Service) can only be accomplished through partnership efforts with other federal agencies, state and local governments, tribal governments, international and private organizations, and individuals.

The Service manages nearly 94 million acres across the United States, encompassing a network of 514 refuges of the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) and 65 National Fish Hatcheries (NFHS). The National Wildlife Refuge System, the National Fish Hatchery System, along with the fish, wildlife, and plants that these systems protect and conserve, enrich people in a great variety of ways. Service lands provide recreational opportunities to 31 million visitors annually ---generates $401.1 million in sales to regional economies; while recreational fishing annually contributes over $38 billion to national and regional economies. The Service's FY 1999 Enacted Appropriations will provide about $1.4 billion in support of Service and state grants programs. The Service employs approximately 8,000 individuals and 28,000 volunteers at facilities across the country.

I.2 Mission Statement

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's mission is, working with others, to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

I.3 Relationship to Departmental Goals

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has 3 Mission Goals (GPRA Program Activities) and 12 Long-term Goals. The Mission and Long-term Goals address program activities in three primary areas of the mission delivery: Sustaining Fish and Wildlife Populations, Habitat Conservation, and Public Use and Enjoyment of the Resource. The Mission and Long-term Goals directly support three of the five Department of Interior's Goals. These are: #1 - "Protect the Environment and Preserve Our Nation's Natural anc Cultural Resources," and #2 - "Provide Recreation for America."
 
The following table relates the Service's GPRA program and long-term goals to the goals of the DOI. Explanation of the DOI goals can be found in the DOI Overview. Each long-term goal meets the GPRA requirements in that it defines the level of performance to be achieved, expressed in an objective, quantifiable, and measurable form that provides a basis for comparing actual program results.
 
 
DOI Goals 
 
 

I. Protect the Environment and Preserve Our Nation's Natural and Cultural Resources 

GPRA Program Activity 

[Service Mission Goal I] 

I. Sustainability of Fish and Wildlife Populations  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Service Long-Term Goal 
 
 
 
1.1 Migratory Birds -- By 2003, 20% of regional migratory bird populations demonstrate improvements in their population status because of management actions that have either increased their numbers or, in some cases, reduced the number of conflicts due to overabundance. 

1.2 Imperiled Species -- By 2003, 40% of endangered and threatened species populations listed a decade or more are stabilized or improved and 60 species in decline are precluded from the need for listing under the Endangered Species Act

1.3 Interjurisdictional Fish -- By 2003, 100% of stable interjurisdictional fish populations remain at or above current levels and 3% of depressed populations are restored to self-sustaining or, where appropriate, harvestable levels. 

1.4 Marine Mammals -- By 2003, 100% of marine mammal populations over which the Service has jurisdiction will be at sustainable population levels or protected under conservation agreements. 

1.5 Species of International Concern -- By 2003, 40% of transborder species of international concern over which the Service has jurisdiction will benefit from improved conservation efforts; and conservation projects for 40 additional priority species of international concern will benefit from improved conservation efforts. 

DOI Goals 
 
 

I. Protect the Environment and Preserve Our Nation's Natural and Cultural Resources 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

GPRA Program Activity 

[Service-Mission Goal II] 

II. Habitat Conservation: A Network of Land and Waters  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Service Long-Term Goal 
 
 

2.1 Habitat Conservation On Service Lands -- By 2003, meet the identified habitat needs of the Service lands by ensuring that 93,654,000 acres (total acreage in the NWRS) are protected, of which 3,5000,000 acres will be enhanced or restored. In addition, 80% of contaminated cleanup projects will be completed according to their original schedule 
 
2.2 Infrastructure Stewardship On Service Lands -- By 2003, 23% of mission critical water management and public use facilities will be in fair or good condition as measured by the Facilities Condition Index. 

2.3 Habitat Conservation Off Service Lands -- By 2003, improve the fish and wildlife populations focusing on trust resources, threatened and endangered species, and species of special concern by protecting, enhancing, and/or restoring 250,000 acres of wetlands habitat, restoring 395,000 acres of upland habitat, and enhancing and/or restoring 2,500 riparian or stream miles of habitat off-Service lands through partnerships and other identified conservation strategies. 
 

DOI Goals  
 
 

II. Provide Recreation for America  
 
 
 
 

GPRA Program Activity 

[Service Mission Goal III] 

III. Public Use and Enjoyment 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 

Service Long-Term Goal  
  
  

3.1 Greater Public Use on Service Lands -- By 2003, interpretive, educational and recreational visits to National Wildlife Refuges and National Fish Hatcheries have increased by 10%.   

3.2 Opportunities for Participating in Conservation On Service Lands -- By 2003, volunteer participation hours in Service programs is increased by 50% and refuges and hatcheries have 91 new friends groups over the FY 1997 levels. 

3.3 Greater Public Use Off Service Lands -- By 2003, 100% of all Federal Aid state grant monies are used consistent with the enabling legislation. 

3.4 Greater Opportunities for Participating in Recreational Fishing -- By 2003, 100% of mitigation hatchery production requirements are satisfied related to federal water development projects.

 

1.4 Additional Annual Performance Plan Requirements

I.4.1 Linkage to Strategic Plans

The Service uses three kinds of goals for the implementation of GPRA.

The Service's FY 1999 Annual Performance Plan is measured by performance indicators, to assess progress generally against a historical baseline. This direct linkage facilitates and allows progress to be measured in achieving the long-term goals over the period covered by the Strategic Plan. The target percentages and numbers in the long-term and annual performance goals were developed by the appropriate program authorities in collaboration with the Service's GPRA Core Team and approved by the Service Directorate.

1.4.2 Linkage to the Budget

The Service has chosen to use the GPRA Program Activities (Mission Goals) structure as a means of facilitating a crosswalk from the functionally-based budget structure to the results-based long-term and annual goals of the organization. GPRA program activities, as described in OMB circular A-11, provide for a consolidation, aggregation, or disaggregation of program activities that are covered or described by a set of performance goals. The Service has identified the three principle sets of strategic plan performance goals--Mission Goals-- as the GPRA Program Activities.

I.4.3 Use of Non-Federal Parties in Preparing this Annual Performance Plan

The Service's Annual Performance Plan was prepared in conformance with Section 220.7 of OMB Circular A-11. Preparation of the Annual Performance Plan involved Service employs in all regions and at every level of the organization. The Service's Annual Work Guidance directly reflects the goals and performance the Service intends to achieve in annual increments toward successfully completing its long-term strategic goals.

1.4.4 Adjustments to the Strategic Plan

During the past year, discussions with the Department of the Interior, Office of Management and Budget, the General Accounting Office, and Congressional staff on the Department's and Service's first Strategic Plan, and FY 1999 Annual Performance Plan, submitted to Congress, have emphasized the need to reduce the complexity and number of goals and measures, improve the clarity of performance information, and improve the linkage of funding to performance setting and results.

The Service has learned from the past year's experiences and has refocused its Strategic Plan. The September 1997 Strategic Plan provided the foundation for this effort to streamline and simplify our goals and measures. The September 1998 version retains the primary mission goals which focuses directly on the Service's significant mission responsibilities; Sustainable Fish and Wildlife Populations, Habitat Conservation, and the Public's Use and Enjoyment of the Resource On Service Lands. The September 1998 version achieves a substantial reduction in the number of goals and performance measures through aggregation and consolidation; resulting in the elimination of 8 long-term goals and 60 performance measures. The streamlined plan combines 2 strategic goals for threatened and endangered species, quantified the interjurisdictional fish and migratory bird goals, established an international species goal, simplified all habitat goals, and limited the public use goals to Service activities. Further, the refocused Strategic Plan excludes the organizational management goals (i.e., means goals) presented in the Service's initial Strategic Plan as -- Mission Goal 4 Workforce Excellence. Goals for internal bureau functions and operations, are not included in the GPRA Strategic and Annual Performance Plans. These essential operational processes are discussed within the context of support necessary to achieve the annual goals. The following is a comparison chart of the recent changes made in the Service September 1997 Strategic Plan.
 
September 1997
Long-Term Goals
Refocused - September 1998 
Long-Term Goals
Comments
Sustainability of Fish and Wildlife Populations  

Mission Goal 1: Migratory birds, endangered fish, wildlife and plant species, interjurisdictional fish, and marine mammals are conserved, protected, enhanced or restored. The Service is participating in conservation of other species when its expertise, facilities, or lands can enhance State or Tribal, or local efforts. 

Sustainability of Fish and Wildlife Populations 

Mission Goal 1: Migratory birds, endangered fish, wildlife and plant species, interjurisdictional fish, marine mammals, and species of international concern are conserved, protected, enhanced or restored. The Service is participating in conservation of other species when its expertise, facilities, or lands can enhance state, tribal, local, or other efforts. 

 
 
 
Rewritten to include species of international concern, to include all our partner groups. 
1.1 Migratory Birds 
By 2002, Migratory bird populations are conserved in accordance with partnerships and approved plans.
1.1 Migratory Birds 
By 2003, 20% of regional migratory bird populations demonstrate improvements in their population status because of management actions that have either increased their numbers or, in some cases, reduced the number of conflicts due to overabundance.
New Goal--added target..
  1.2 Imperiled Species 
By 2003, 40% of endangered and threatened species populations listed a decade or more are stabilized or improved and 60 species in decline are precluded from the need for listing under the Endangered Species Act. 
New Goal-- uses "Imperiled Species" instead of "Declining Aquatic Species" 

Former 1.2-- IJ fish goal moved to 1.3 

1.2 Interjurisdictional Fish Through 2002, interjurisdictional fish populations are conserved through conservation efforts related to approved management plans.  1.3 Interjurisdictional Fish 
Through 2003, 100% of stable interjurisdictional fish populations remain at or above current levels and 3% of depressed populations are restored to self-sustaining or, where appropriate, harvestable levels.
Rewritten IJ fish goal with targets for stable IJ fish populations and depressed populations restored and/or harvestable levels.
1.3 Declining Aquatic Species 
By 2002, the population levels of 20% of identified declining aquatic species are stabilized or increased through proactive conservation measures.
  1.3, now 1.2 with target based on "Imperiled Species" instead of "aquatic species"
1.4 Marine Mammals 
By 2002, Alaskan marine mammal populations are conserved through provisions of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, international agreements and co-management plan objectives.
1.4 Marine Mammals 
By 2003, 100% of marine mammal populations, over which the Service has jurisdiction, will be at sustainable population levels or protected under conservation agreements. 
Rewritten to include marine mammals outside of Alaska.
1.5 Candidate Species 
By 2002, the status of 183 candidate (to be considered for listing as threatened or endangered) species has been resolved.
1.5 Species of International Concern - By 2003, 40% of transborder species of international concern over which the Service has jurisdiction will benefit from conservation efforts; and conservation projects for 40 additional priority species of international concern will benefit from improved conservation efforts.  New SG 1.5 
Former 1.5--concept moved to new SG 1.2
1.6 Stabilized T&E Populations 
By 2002, 40% of endangered and threatened species populations are stabilized or improved.
  1.6 -- Incorporated into new SG 1.2, target remains the same 
1.7 Species Decline (LE) 
By 2002, illegal activities as a factor in the decline of any federally-protected species are reduced by 5 %.
  1.7-- Incorporated into new SG 1.2,
1.8 Native American tribes 
By 2002, Service fish and wildlife conservation assistance is increased by 50% to Native American tribes in furtherance of The Native American Policy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Secretarial Order 3206.
  1.8--Removed from SGs, Elevated to Service strategy, discussed in the INTRODUCTION section.
Habitat Conservation -Network of Lands & Waters 

Mission Goal 2: An ecologically diverse network of lands and waters---of various ownerships--- is conserved to provide habitats for marine mammals and migratory, interjurisdictional, threatened, endangered, and other species associated with ecosystems conserved in cooperation with others.

Habitat Conservation -Network of Lands & Waters 

Mission Goal 2: An ecologically diverse network of lands and waters--of various ownerships--is conserved in cooperation with others to provide habitats for migratory birds, imperiled species, interjurisdictional fish, marine mammals and species of international concern associated with those ecosystems. 

 
 
 
Species reordered to duplicate the chronological order of the strategic goals. "Imperiled Species" used instead of threatened/endangered.
Agreements with others By 2002, agreements are reached among the Service, other federal agencies, nations, states, tribes, local governments, and private landowners and organizations to provide habitat for marine mammals and migratory, endangered, threatened, interjurisdictional, and other species associated with ecosystems conserved in cooperation with others. 2.1 Habitat Conservation On Service Lands  
By 2003, meet the identified habitat needs of the Service lands by ensuring that 93,654,000 acres (total acreage in the NWRS) are protected, of which 3,500,000 acres will be enhanced or restored. In addition, 80% of cleanup projects on Service lands will be completed according to their original schedule. 
Removed as strategic goal , discussed in the Strategic Plan strategies and in the MISSION & INTRODUCTION sections 

New 2.1 incorporates 2.4

2.2 Upland habitats 
By 2002, 64.7 million acres of upland habitats are protected, restored, or enhanced.
2.2 Infrastructure Stewardship On Service Lands 
By 2003, 23% of mission critical water management and public use facilities will be in fair or good condition as measured by the Facilities Condition Index. 
2.2 Removed Uplands as strategic goal, consolidated into new 2.1 & 2.3 

New 2.2 strategic goal, also added "fair or" good condition

2.3 Wetlands & Riparian Habitats 
By 2002, 28.4 million acres of wetlands and 3,250 miles of riparian habitats are protected, restored or enhanced.
2.3 Habitat Conservation Off Service Lands 
By 2003, improve the fish and wildlife populations focusing on trust resources, threatened and endangered species of special concern by protecting, enhancing, restoring or create 250,000 acres of wetlands habitat, restoring 395,000 acres of wetlands habitat, and enhancing and/or restoring 2,500 riparian or stream miles of habitat off-Service lands through partnerships and other identified conservation strategies.
Rewritten to focus on trust resources and threatened and endangered species and to include partnerships off-Service lands
2.4 Deep Water & Riverine Habitats  
By 2002, 15.5 million acres of deep water and riverine habitat are protected, restored, or enhanced.
  2.4 Removed as strategic goal and incorporated into new 2.1 & 2.3 
2.5 Consultation & Technical Assistance 
By 2000, mechanisms are developed---in consultation with others---and implemented to determine the habitat benefits of Service consultative and technical assistance. 
  2.5 Removed as a strategic goal. Concept incorporated in narratives.
2.6 HCPs 
By 2002, 27 million acres of habitats for endangered and threatened species and species of concern are included in Habitat Conservation Plans through the implementation of Section 10 of the Endangered Species Act. 
  2.6 Removed as strategic goal and discussed in narratives.
Americans and Wildlife 

Mission Goal 3: Americans have the opportunity to understand and participate in the conservation and use of fish and wildlife resources.

Public Use and Enjoyment 

Mission Goal 3: Our citizens and guests have the opportunity to understand and participate in the conservation and use of fish and wildlife resources. 

 
 
Americans changed to "our citizens and guests" to include internationals.
3.1 Greater Public Understanding 
By 2002, an increasing percentage of Americans are reached by Service activities and understand the relationship between healthy fish and wildlife resources and sound management practices. 
3.1 Greater Public Use on Service Lands 
By 2003, interpretive, educational and recreational visits to National Wildlife Refuges and National Fish Hatcheries have increased by 10%.
3.1 Removed public understanding from strategic goal, but discussed in narratives. 

New 3.1 includes target for 10% increase in visits to NWR & NFH

3.2 Opportunities For Participation 
By 2002, opportunities for participation in uses of fish and wildlife resources have increased by 3% from 1996 levels.
3.2 Opportunities for Participating in Conservation On Service Lands 
By 2003, volunteer participation hours in Service programs is increased by 
50% and refuges and hatcheries have 91 new friends groups from the FY 1997 level.
3.2 Rewritten, concepts in new 3.1 and 3.4 

New 3.2 includes increased target for volunteer hours and a new target for increased NWR (50) & NFH (10) friends groups.

3.3 Volunteer Participation 
By 2002, volunteer participation in Service fish and wildlife programs has increased by 5% in the number of hours from 1997 levels. 
  3.3 moved to 3.2 and target for volunteer hours increased.
  3.3 Greater Public Use Off Service Lands 
Through 2003, 100% of all Federal Aid state grant monies are used consistent with the enabling legislation.
New 3.3---Federal Aid
  3.4 Greater Opportunities for Participating in Recreational Fishing  
By 2002, 100% of mitigation hatchery production requirements are satisfied related to federal water development projects.
3.4 New fishery mitigation strategic goal.
Workforce Excellence 
Mission Goal 4: The Service's workforce, scientific capability and business practices---in cooperation with the Department's scientific expertise---fully support the achievement of the bureau's mission.
  Removed. Elements were incorporated into Mission Goals 1 and 2. Concepts elevated as Service Statements of Principles to govern all actions of the Service; thus, adopted as Standard Operating Procedures (SOP's).
 

I.4.5 Waivers for Managerial Accountability and Flexibility

The Service is requesting no waivers of administrative procedural requirements and controls.
 
 


For Further Information, Contact Al Zara at: al_zara@fws.gov

Table of Contents:FY 1999 Annual Performance Plan
Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Home Page