Permits

Frequently Asked Questions and Facts Index "T/U/V/W/X/Y/Z"

WolfThe following alphabetical index is to help you quickly find the answer to general permit questions. The keywords lead you to frequently asked questions and their answer, as well as links to fact sheets and specific web pages.

ALPHABETICAL INDEX:

[A] [B]  [C]  [D]  [E]  [F/G/H]  [I/J/K]  [L/M]  [N/O/P/Q]  [R]  [S]] 

 

Keyword – T/U/V/W/X/Y/Z

Question/Answer/Fact

Taxidermy

What are the requirements for a taxidermy permit? Click here for fact sheet.

Taxus media

Does artifically propagated Taxus mediarequire a CITES permit to be exported? Taxus media,a hybrid of Taxus cuspidata x T. bacatta,was listed in Appendix II of CITES on January 12, 2005. As such it requires a CITES permit to export or re-export all parts and derivatives except the follow: (a) seeds and pollen and (b) finished pharmaceutical products. Additionally, whole artificially propagated plants in pots or other small containers, each consignment being accompanied by a label or document stating the name of the taxon or taxa and the text "artificially propagated," are not subject to the provisions of the Convention. Click here for a U.S. CITES permit application form. Check with APHIS, the State, and foreign country to meet their requirements.

Timber

Do timber species need permits?  A number of tree species are listed, and certain activities, such as import or export, of the plant, parts, products, and derivatives may require permits.  Check the CITES list and the ESA list to see how the species is protected.  Under CITES, check the annotation (footnote or description) since for some species only some parts, products, and derivatives, such as logs, sawn wood, and veneers, are regulated. Check with APHIS and the foreign country to meet their requirements.

Turtles, Red-eared

Do I need a permit to import or export red-eared turtles?  You do not need a permit from us for the non-commercial import or export of red-eared turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).  A person engaged in business as an importer or exporter of wildlife must obtain an import/export license.  You must import or export your pet red-eared turtle through a designated port unless you have received a port exception permit. You must notify the FWS wildlife inspection office at the port of entry or exit at least 48 hours in advance, present our declaration form to the wildlife inspectors, and receive clearance from us prior to export or at the time of import. Click here for our information on commercially importing and exporting wildife. Check with the Centers for Disease Control for size limits of turtles for import and interstate transport. Check with the State and foreign country to meet their requirements.

Urine

Do I need a permit to import or export urine?  You do not need a permit from us to import or export urine into or out of the United States.  We consider samples of urine to be a wildlife byproduct, rather than a part, product, or derivative.  While we do not regulate urine samples, we believe it is important that researchers collect samples in a manner that does not harm the wildlife and that complies with the laws of the country where the collection occurs.  Contact the foreign country to meet its requirements. If the foreign country requires you to have a U.S. CITES document for urine samples, click here for an application form.

Venus Flytrap

Do I need a permit to export my personally owned Venus flytraps?  The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is listed in CITES Appendix II.

  • You do not need a permit from us to export a Venus flytrap that is part of your accompanying baggage or is part of a household move and is for personal use.
  • Not all CITES countries recognize the personal or household effects exemption, and may require a CITES permit. Also, some countries may require an import permit under their domestic legislation.  Contact the foreign country to meet its requirements. If the foreign country requires you to have a U.S. CITES document, click here for an application form.
  • Click here for a CITES fact sheet. The specimen must exit the United States through a designated port.  Contact APHIS and the State to meet their requirements.

Wart Hog Tusks

Do I need a permit to import wart hog tusks?  You do not need a permit from us to import wart hog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) tusks into the United States for personal use.  A person engaged in business as an importer of wildlife must obtain an import/export license.  If you are importing wart hog tusks for your personal use in your accompanying baggage, you must declare the items on the Customs declaration form. Click here for information if you are commercially importing wart hog tusks, of if you are separately shipping personal items through the mail or as cargo. Contact the State and foreign country to meet their requirements.

Wild Bird Conservation Act (WBCA)

Permit Information

Wolf, Gray

Do I need a permit to import, export, or sell in interstate commerce a wolf pelt or product?  The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is listed in CITES Appendix II, except populations of Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan, which are listed in Appendix I. Some U.S. populations are listed under the ESA as endangered or threatened. The following applies to wolf pelts that are listed in Appendix II and not listed under the ESA (for example, pelts that originated in Alaska or Canada):

  • You should keep records that demonstrate the origin of wolf pelts or products.
  • To export or re-export a pelt or product for personal accompanying baggage or to move household effects, you do not need a permit from us.
  • Not all CITES countries recognize the personal effects or household move exemptions, and may require a CITES permit. Also, some countries may require an import permit under their domestic legislation.  Contact the foreign country to meet its requirements. If the foreign country requires you to have a U.S. cites document, click here for an application form.
  • If the wolf pelt or product is being mailed or shipped separately, the shipment must be accompanied by a CITES permit.
  • To import a pelt or product, check with the foreign country to meet its requirements.
  • A person engaged in business as an importer or exporter of wildlife must obtain an import/export license.
  • You do not need a CITES or ESA permit from us to sell a non-ESA-listed wolf pelt or product in interstate or foreign commerce.
  • A gray wolf trophy lawfully taken by a U.S. resident in Canada and imported for non-commercial purposes may be imported at any Customs port of entry. You must declare your trophy using our declaration form, and file it with U.S. Customs if a FWS wildlife inspector is not available. For imports from other than Canada, you must import or export your trophy through a designated port unless you have received a port exception permit. If your trophy is perishable, you must notify the wildlife inspection office at the port of entry or exit at least 48 hours in advance. You must present our declaration form to the wildlife inspectors, and receive clearance from us at the time of import. If your taxidermist is importing the trophy for you, he or she will need an import/export license.
  • Check with the State to meet its requirements.

Zebra, Hartmann’s Mountain

Do I need a permit to import my personal sport-hunted trophy?  The Hartmann’s mountain zebra is listed in CITES Appendix II and threatened under the ESA. In general, a permit is required to import threatened species.

  • The Hartmann’s mountain zebra, however, may be imported into the United States for personal non-commercial purposes, such as a personally taken sport-hunted trophy, without a threatened species permit, as long as the item was not part of a commercial activity.  It must be accompanied by a foreign CITES permit which indicates that the item is for non-commercial purposes (Purpose Code “H”) on the face of the document.  Contact the foreign country to meet its requirements.
  • The import of a zebra, its skin or other products purchased by tourists requires the prior issuance of a threatened species permit (click here for an application form), as well as a CITES permit from the foreign country.        
  • You must import your zebra item through a designated port unless you have received a port exception permit. If you are importing a trophy and it is perishable, you must notify the FWS wildlife inspection office at the port of entry or exit at least 48 hours in advance. You must present our declaration form to the wildlife inspectors, and receive clearance from us at the time of import. Check with the State to meet its requirements.

CITES:   Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
BGEPA: Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act
ESA:      Endangered Species Act
MBTA:   Migratory Bird Treaty Act
MMPA:  Marine Mammal Protection Act
WBCA:  Wild Bird Conservation Act

For additional information, visit the Fish and Wildlife Service's Frequently Asked Questions web site.

Last updated: September 21, 2010