East Lansing Ecological Services Field Office

Midwest Region

East Lansing Field Office
2651 Coolidge Road
East Lansing, MI 48823
Phone: 517-351-2555
Fax: 517-351-1443
TTY: 1-800-877-8339 (Federal Relay)

e-mail: EastLansing@fws.gov

 

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Kirtland's warbler. Photo by USFWS; Joel Trick

Welcome

We work with public and private entities to conserve and restore Michigan's endangered species, migratory birds, wetlands, and other important fish and wildlife resources.

 

Outline of the state of Michigan with star showing location of the East Lansing Field Office.

 

Featured Story

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Determines Critical Habitat is

Not Prudent for Threatened Northern Long-eared Bat

 

Photo by Ann Froschauer/USFWS

 

April 25, 2016

Determination based on desire to reduce potential disturbance at hibernation sites, habitat requirements of species, and acknowledgement of white-nose syndrome as primary threat

 

Given the nature of the primary threats facing the species and the potential harm of publishing its hibernation locations, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that designating critical habitat for the northern long-eared bat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is not prudent. The Service’s determination does not affect the bat’s threatened status, which it received in 2015 due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease impacting cave-dwelling bats.

 

Critical habitat is a designation under the ESA for lands that contain habitat features that are essential for the survival and recovery of a listed species, which may require special management considerations or protections. The ESA requires the Service to consider which areas are needed for a species’ recovery and to designate critical habitat accordingly, unless it determines that doing so is not prudent for the species.

 

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Northern Long-eared Bat Home

 


 

Check out the 2016 Piping Plover Field Journal

 

The first piping plover to arrive back at the Great Lakes, for the second year in a row, is male plover BO:X,g.

Photo courtesy of Alice Van Zoeren

 

The first plovers are back from their wintering areas - including a nine-year old female that wintered in Cuba.

2016 Field Journal

 

 


 

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Last updated: April 25, 2016