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The Service brings art and science together through a partnership with Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
Northeast Region, August 4, 2014
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Three artists at a New Haven school point to their drawings. These drawings won a school- wide environmental art competition to illustrate their Schoolyard Habitat sign.
Three artists at a New Haven school point to their drawings. These drawings won a school- wide environmental art competition to illustrate their Schoolyard Habitat sign. - Photo Credit: USFWS
Students researched facts about local wildlife, drew illustrations and experimented with graphic design to create interpretive signs for their new Schoolyard habitats
Students researched facts about local wildlife, drew illustrations and experimented with graphic design to create interpretive signs for their new Schoolyard habitats - Photo Credit: USFWS
Students researched facts about local wildlife, drew illustrations and experimented with graphic design to create interpretive signs for their new Schoolyard habitats
Students researched facts about local wildlife, drew illustrations and experimented with graphic design to create interpretive signs for their new Schoolyard habitats - Photo Credit: USFWS

What do urban students, wildlife biologists and graphic designers have in common?
They share an interest in working together to create interpretive signs for the new Schoolyard Habitats in New Haven’s Urban Wildlife Refuge.

 

Through the recent Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative, the Service partnered with David Heiser, head of education and outreach at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. David worked with biologists, a graphic design team and groups of students at schools across New Haven to collaboratively develop unique signs for their new Schoolyard Habitats. “The experience was both energizing and challenging,” David says. “The teachers, students and parents who worked through the process – from blank slate to finished product – brought so many creative ideas to the table. They were delighted to see those ideas play out in the final signs.”

Three schools were certified to the Service's Schoolyard Habitat Program this year and are part of the Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative in New Haven, one of the first pilot sites in the country. The signs created at each school brought art and science together and helped engage young people in nature, a key focus of the Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative. “During the Schoolyard Habitat dedication, the student artists were recognized by name,” David says. “Seeing pride on the faces of the students and their parents, and knowing that their confidence will be lifted each time they walk past that sign, this is the moment that stands out the most for me.”


Contact Info: Jennifer Lapis, 413-253-8303, Jennifer_Lapis@fws.gov



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