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Chesapeake Bay Field Office Works with Delmarva Power to Replace Invasive Shrubs
Northeast Region, April 11, 2014
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CBFO's Chris DeVore (left) and Robbie Callahan (right) auger holes for wax myrtle shrubs
CBFO's Chris DeVore (left) and Robbie Callahan (right) auger holes for wax myrtle shrubs - Photo Credit: Christine Carpenter, USFWS
CBFO's Emily Starnes planting wax myrtle
CBFO's Emily Starnes planting wax myrtle - Photo Credit: Christine Carpenter USFWS
invasive autumn olive (left) and newly planted wax myrtle (right)
invasive autumn olive (left) and newly planted wax myrtle (right) - Photo Credit: Christine Carpenter USFWS

After last spring’s successful removal of non-native autumn olive in the Northbrook Subdivision, Queen Anne’s County MD, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service again partnered with Delmarva Power and Queen Anne's County Department of Parks and Recreation to complete a follow-up for homeowners that did not participate the previous year. On April 2nd, 580 feet of the invasive shrub were removed and replaced with 80 native evergreen wax myrtle shrubs. Autumn olive competes with native plants and adversely affects the nitrogen cycle of the soil.

 

Five years ago, the Chesapeake Bay Field Office's Partners program restored 100 acres of grassland, forests, and wetlands on Bloomfield Farm Park, Queen Anne’s County MD. Several years later, the natural areas soon became over-run with invasive plants, mostly autumn olive.
Birds had been spreading the seeds from a nearby traffic buffer and Delmarva Power right-of-way along state Route 213 near the Northbrook subdivision.

In 2012, more than 20 landowners agreed to provide partners, access to the overgrown hedgerow so that the invasive autumn olive could be removed and replaced with about 200 native evergreen wax myrtle shrubs.

The wax myrtle will provide year-round cover for the homeowners, and the attractive berries will provide food for birds and other for wildlife. Wax myrtle is one of many native plants used to restore habitat, protect the Chesapeake Bay, and keep nearby Corsica and Chester rivers clean.

“Reducing the spread of autumn olive protects the young forests and meadows in Bloomfield Farm Park,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Rich Mason. “Besides providing food and habitat for birds, the wax myrtle will grow into an attractive buffer between residents' backyards and a busy road,” he added.

For more information contact:

Rich Mason
410/573-4584
rich_mason@fws.gov


Contact Info: Kathryn Reshetiloff, 410-573-4582, kathryn_reshetiloff@fws.gov



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