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ARCATA FWO: 55 Volunteers, 1 Landowner, 1 Day: Klamath Restoration Effort Benefits Coho and Other Native Wildlife
California-Nevada Offices , February 26, 2014
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Riparian planting on prime off-channel rearing habitat for ESA-listed coho salmon takes place on privately owned agricultural land in the Lower Klamath River near the estuary along lower South Fork Panther Creek.
Riparian planting on prime off-channel rearing habitat for ESA-listed coho salmon takes place on privately owned agricultural land in the Lower Klamath River near the estuary along lower South Fork Panther Creek. - Photo Credit: Paula Golightly/USFWS
A rain-soaked volunteer crew of 55 people spent the day helping to protect rare fish and wildlife near the estuary of the Klamath River.
A rain-soaked volunteer crew of 55 people spent the day helping to protect rare fish and wildlife near the estuary of the Klamath River. - Photo Credit: Paula Golightly/USFWS

By Paula Golightly

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office coordinated a volunteer riparian planting day on private agricultural land in the Lower Klamath River near the estuary along lower South Fork Panther Creek, February 8, 2014.

Partners for Fish and Wildlife program staff, and fifty-five hard working and dedicated volunteers arrived and spent the day planting native trees and shrubs in the pouring rain.

The Partners program works with private landowners who want to help improve fish and/or wildlife habitats on their property.

Approximately 1,400 trees and shrubs were planted. The volunteers were from the California Conservation Corps, Americorps Watershed Stewards Program, Humboldt State University Natural Resources Club and the Humboldt Fish Action Council.

Planting was the final phase of a project funded by the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program to deepen and enhance off-channel wetlands, construct livestock exclusionary fencing and plant native vegetation at the project location.

Two culverts that impeded fish passage were also removed and replaced with wooden bridges. The landowner implemented much of the work with oversight by Partners' staff. Project work focused on providing benefits to rearing non-natal coho salmon juveniles and smolts with migratory song birds, waterfowl, and amphibians also benefitting.

Recent studies conducted by the Yurok Tribe and California Department of Fish and Wildlife demonstrate the regional importance of off-channel rearing wetlands to non-natal coho salmon, and point to the lack of off-channel habitat as being one of the most important limiting factors to coho production in the entire basin.

- FWS -

Paula Golightly is the Supervisory Fish and Wildlife Biologist (Habitat Rest. - PFW, Coastal) at the Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office in Arcata, California.


Contact Info: Matt Baun, 530-842-5763, matt_baun@fws.gov



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