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TETLIN: What's all the buzz about?
Alaska Region, September 17, 2013
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A new interpretive sign explaining the timing and synchronization of biological events
A new interpretive sign explaining the timing and synchronization of biological events - Photo Credit: Kay Lynn Odle-Moore
A new interpretive panel explaining factors that may affect the timing of biological events, as well as the consequences of events becoming mis-matched
A new interpretive panel explaining factors that may affect the timing of biological events, as well as the consequences of events becoming mis-matched - Photo Credit: Kay Lynn Odle-Moore
A new interpretive panel explaining the importance of pollinators
A new interpretive panel explaining the importance of pollinators - Photo Credit: Kay Lynn Odle-Moore
Biologist Nicole Wells helps orient volunteers Tally and Robert Hamilton, and Liza Olson, to the phenology gardens and our monitoring protocols
Biologist Nicole Wells helps orient volunteers Tally and Robert Hamilton, and Liza Olson, to the phenology gardens and our monitoring protocols - Photo Credit: Kay Lynn Odle-Moore
Volunteers Gay and Jim Brantley make observations on native plants in the phenology garden
Volunteers Gay and Jim Brantley make observations on native plants in the phenology garden - Photo Credit: Kay Lynn Odle-Moore

Look what cropped up this summer in the phenology boxes at Tetlin Refuge – four educational panels on phenology! Refuge staff, with the help of Kristen Gilbert in the Anchorage Regional Office, created these panels on the timing and synchronization of biological events, factors that may alter synchronization, the benefits of pollinators, and ways people can become involved.
As part of the phenology monitoring program at Tetlin Refuge, which began in 2010, the refuge built phenology boxes at the Refuge’s headquarters, campground, and visitor center. Native flowers were planted in the boxes, and their phenology is being monitored using protocols from the National Phenology Network. With the help of volunteers, the Refuge makes regular observations on the stages of plant growth and reproduction, and the use and frequency of pollinators. Our volunteers have enjoyed being involved in this citizen science project, and have enthusiastically shared their work with refuge visitors through interpretive programs and discussions. This project is part of a pilot effort to encourage phenology monitoring on Alaskan refuges. The data is being collected as part of a partnership with the National Phenology Network and our findings are being submitted to their national database. For more information on this project, contact Nicole Wells at nicole_wells@fws.gov or (907)883-9415.


Contact Info: Nicole Wells, 907-883-9415, nicole_wells@fws.gov



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