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Biologists Examine Eaglet at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge as Part of Post-delisting Monitoring Plan
Midwest Region, May 23, 2013
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An eaglet at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge awaits an examination by East Lansing Field Office Contaminants Specialists.
An eaglet at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge awaits an examination by East Lansing Field Office Contaminants Specialists. - Photo Credit: Jeremy N. Moore/USFWS
A 52-day old female eaglet, 70 feet above ground at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge, creates space between it and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist Jeremy N. Moore
A 52-day old female eaglet, 70 feet above ground at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge, creates space between it and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist Jeremy N. Moore - Photo Credit: Jeremy N. Moore/USFWS
Biologist Jeremy N. Moore of the East Lansing Field Office ties in and prepares to gather a 52-day eaglet at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge.
Biologist Jeremy N. Moore of the East Lansing Field Office ties in and prepares to gather a 52-day eaglet at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge. - Photo Credit: Tim Kaufman/USFWS
The eaglet is gently lowered to the ground where East Lansing Field Office volunteers, Dave and Therese Best, will examine, measure, sample and band it.
The eaglet is gently lowered to the ground where East Lansing Field Office volunteers, Dave and Therese Best, will examine, measure, sample and band it. - Photo Credit: Tim Kaufman/USFWS

On May 9, 2013, Jeremy N. Moore and volunteers Dave Best (retied) and Therese Best of the East Lansing Field Office examined and sampled a 52-day old, female bald eaglet at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge in Saginaw, Mich. The eaglet was temporarily removed from its nest, examined, weighed, measured, banded, and its blood and feathers sampled for contaminant analysis as part of ongoing bald eagle monitoring efforts. East Lansing Field Office coordinates the effort in Michigan as part of the species post-delisting monitoring plan.

In addition, contaminant data from the plasma and feathers provides information on water quality, including current risks to wildlife from DDT/DDE, PCBs, and mercury that managers can use to set discharge permits and prioritize areas for cleanup. Data from this ongoing effort is also used to determine when Great Lakes Areas of Concern have recovered enough to no longer be listed as Areas of Concern by the United States and Canada.

ABC 12 of Flint, MI captured a report of the event:
http://www.abc12.com/story/22209570/52-day-old-bald-eagle-examined-and-banded-in-saginaw-county

Learn more about Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge: http://www.fws.gov/refuge/shiawassee/


ABC 12 of Flint, MI captured a report of the eaglet examination at Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge
http://www.abc12.com/story/22209570/52-day-old-bald-eagle-examined-and-banded-in-saginaw-county
Contact Info: Jeremy Moore, 517-351-8318, jeremy_n_moore@fws.gov



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