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ANCHORAGE FIELD OFFICE: New Pathways Student Uses Innovative Technology to track Salmon in Big Lake, Alaska
Alaska Region, October 16, 2012
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A juvenile coho salmon captured using a minnow trap in Meadow Creek, Alaska
A juvenile coho salmon captured using a minnow trap in Meadow Creek, Alaska - Photo Credit: USFWS
A juvenile coho is injected with a PIT tag
A juvenile coho is injected with a PIT tag - Photo Credit: USFWS
Two swim through antennae’s used to read PIT tag in Lucille Creek, Alaska
Two swim through antennae’s used to read PIT tag in Lucille Creek, Alaska - Photo Credit: USFWS
A multiplexing transceiver system used to energize the antennas and store the PIT tag information
A multiplexing transceiver system used to energize the antennas and store the PIT tag information - Photo Credit: USFWS
A digital readout of a 13 digit alpha numeric code stored inside a PIT tag
A digital readout of a 13 digit alpha numeric code stored inside a PIT tag - Photo Credit: USFWS

Joshua Ashline is a newly appointed Pathways student from the Anchorage Field Office who is attending Alaska Pacific University pursuing a Master’s of Science degree in Environment Science. For his thesis work he will be using an innovative technology - Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags - to track the seasonal habitats utilized by juvenile coho salmon in the rapidly developing Matanuska-Susitna Borough. A PIT tag is a tiny radio frequency identification device (RFID), that once energized emits a 13 digit alpha numeric code used to identify individual coho salmon that have been implanted with a PIT tag. The tag is passive and contains no battery, thus each fish needs to be recaptured or swim through one of seven antennae sites distributed throughout the watershed in order for the tag to be scanned, and tag code recorded. As the tagged juveniles are recaptured or swim past an antenna, valuable data is collected aiding in the identification of the seasonal habitats utilized by juvenile coho and the timing of migrations between these habitats.


Contact Info: Joshua Ashline, 802-316-9850, joshua_ashline@fws.gov



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