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Staff from the Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge Shares Management Ideas with Others
Midwest Region, May 30, 2012
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Participants of the Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge field demonstration check out the new implement used to manage moist soil units.
Participants of the Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge field demonstration check out the new implement used to manage moist soil units. - Photo Credit: Candy Chambers/USFWS
Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Biologist Mick Hanan discusses the rolling technique as the group looks on.
Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Biologist Mick Hanan discusses the rolling technique as the group looks on. - Photo Credit: Candy Chambers/USFWS
Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge Manager Jason Wilson shows a group the results of previous year manipulations using the roller.
Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge Manager Jason Wilson shows a group the results of previous year manipulations using the roller. - Photo Credit: Candy Chambers/USFWS

On May 30, 2012 land managers from private, state and federal entities gathered together to discuss the various techniques used for moist-soil management. The focus of the day was the newly implemented rolling technique used at the Clarence Cannon and Great River National Wildlife Refuges. This technique provides managers the ability to manipulate soils and vegetation in wet conditions, allowing for work to be completed earlier in the season and during flood years when otherwise they may not be able to access management units.

Approximately 25 land managers representing over 75,000 acres of private, Missouri Department of Conservation, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service properties were in attendance. The day included a field demonstration of the rolling technique and site visits to areas where manipulations occurred in past years as well as earlier in the season. Many good questions and discussions ensued throughout the day as managers from wetland areas in the Missouri Bootheel, along the Missouri river, and also from Illinois viewed the technique for the first time. More discussion will likely occur as they consider this new technique for their areas.


Contact Info: Candace Chambers, 573.847.2333, candy_chambers@fws.gov



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