Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Friends of Big Muddy Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge host Garlic Mustard Pull and Fish Fry
Midwest Region, April 14, 2012
Print Friendly Version
Friends of Big Muddy members converse with refuge staff at the fish fry.
Friends of Big Muddy members converse with refuge staff at the fish fry. - Photo Credit: USFWS photo
Stan Hudson of the Missouri Mycological Society discusses native edible Missouri mushrooms to members of Friends of Big Muddy
Stan Hudson of the Missouri Mycological Society discusses native edible Missouri mushrooms to members of Friends of Big Muddy - Photo Credit: USFWS photo

The Friends of Big Muddy hosted an invasive garlic mustard pull and fish fry on the Overton Bottoms South Unit of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge on a bright sunny Saturday April 21, 2012.

 

Refuge staff along with volunteers participated in the event. Prior to departing on the trip Stan Hudson of the Missouri Mycological Society spoke to the group about morel and other edible mushrooms. Hudson's talk covered the unique life history of mushrooms and how they disperse on the landscape. Locating the mushrooms presented the topic of most interest as morels provide the most sought after wild edible on the refuge.

The volunteers spent three hours pulling and bagging invasive garlic mustard. A spreading concern on the refuge, garlic mustard grows quickly and soon becomes the dominant plant found in the understory of the refuge’s bottomland forests. Chemicals in the mustard suppress other plants from growing by limiting the ability of mycorrhizal fungi to develop in the soil. Mycorrhizal funguses benefit numerous native plants by helping them absorb water and nutrients.

After the garlic mustard removal volunteers were treated to a fish fry and pot luck lunch at the Overton Bottoms South shop building as a thank you for their efforts. Fish consumed during the fry included bass, crappie and the invasive silver carp. Another invasive species of concern on the refuge silver carp are native to Asia. Their rapid reproduction create a threat to native fish. Their habit of jumping out of the water at approaching boats also creates a safety hazard to boaters. Demonstrating that the carp are good to eat may be the best way to help reduce their numbers by creating a recreational fishery for them.

Friends of Big Muddy Garlic Mustard Pull and Fish Fry proved to be a productive event to build cooperation against the onslaught of invasive species on the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge.


Contact Info: Tim Haller, 573-441-2799, tim_haller@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer