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ALASKA PENINSULA/BECHAROF:Volunteers Provide Exceptional Service
Alaska Region, November 30, 2011
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From left: USFWS archeologist Tom Prang and VIP Paul Boskoffsky.  From right: VIPs Ken Fawcett and Bill Beattie.
From left: USFWS archeologist Tom Prang and VIP Paul Boskoffsky. From right: VIPs Ken Fawcett and Bill Beattie. - Photo Credit: Julia Pinnix, USFWS
SCA Kanatak Trail Crew members on eastern section of trail.
SCA Kanatak Trail Crew members on eastern section of trail. - Photo Credit: Julia Pinnix, USFWS
Refuge Manager Bill Schaff training VIPs Hannah Smith, Jack Trout, and Sam Roberts in gun safety.
Refuge Manager Bill Schaff training VIPs Hannah Smith, Jack Trout, and Sam Roberts in gun safety. - Photo Credit: Julia Pinnix, USFWS
Biology Intern Robert Finer in the field.
Biology Intern Robert Finer in the field. - Photo Credit: Kevin Payne, USFWS

19 volunteers helped Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges in 2011. From trailwork to artwork, volunteers have left their mark.

 

Robert Finer, a volunteer intern for Refuge Biologist Susan Savage, assisted with a variety of projects in the field and in the office from May through August. Marla Greanya, a volunteer in 2010, joined him for a month to assist with biology projects.

Paul Boskoffsky, an elder residing in Naknek, provided invaluable assistance with the Kanatak Trail project. He was awarded a check from Alaska Geographic for his service. Paul spoke to several groups about the significance of the Kanatak Trail, provided historical background information for the project, donated dozens of photos, and joined a team in the field to point out the route and other important cultural features. The field crew included volunteers Ken Fawcett of Oregon and Bill Beattie of Idaho, who spent two weeks in early June assisting with marking and recording the route of the Kanatak Trail as well as setting up a field camp at Ruth Lake.

Also on the team was Jack Trout of Oklahoma, who helped establish the Ruth Lake field camp. Jack went on to accomplish a variety of maintenance projects at headquarters in King Salmon. Jack was also awarded a check from Alaska Geographic for his outstanding service.

A work crew of 8 Student Conservations Association volunteers tackled the arduous work of clearing brush from the Kanatak Trail. Between June 5 and June 30, they cleared 4 miles of trail and marked the entire route on GPS. They delivered a public presentation on July 3 demonstrating their experience in the Refuge.

Tom Prang volunteered his time as an educator, delivering natural and cultural history programs in schools around the Alaska Peninsula.

Allan Dreyer was the first Artist for Public Lands to work for the Refuge. He came up from Washington State in July and spent 4 days in Katmai National Park gathering background material. In August, an overflight of the Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges was provided. From these experiences and using photographs, he produced two large paintings for Katmai NP and two for the Refuge. One of each was on display in the King Salmon Visitor Center for National Public Lands Day on September 24. The Refuge will put Allan’s work on permanent display in the headquarters office.

Liz Allard arrived from Kodiak for a week of research to use in forming new Junior Refuge Ranger booklets. The booklets, when completed, will be available for children visiting or residing on the Alaska Peninsula. Children can earn badges for doing all the activities in the booklets, learning about the USFWS and the plants and animals of the area in the process. Cleve and Marty Pinnix helped research educational programs while visiting King Salmon in June.


Contact Info: Julia Pinnix, 907-246-1211, Julia_Pinnix@fws.gov



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